BN.com Gift Guide

Dolphin Talk: Whistles, Clicks, and Clapping Jaws

Overview

Dolphins are smart. They are so smart that they can talk to each other. Dolphins communicate underwater for the same reason people talk on land: to let others know who they are, where they are, and maybe even how to feel. Also included are activities that explore how dolphins talk to each other.

Describes how dolphins communicate with each other in squeaks, whistles, and pops.

Read More ...
See more details below
Paperback (1ST)
$5.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (34) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $3.19   
  • Used (24) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Dolphins are smart. They are so smart that they can talk to each other. Dolphins communicate underwater for the same reason people talk on land: to let others know who they are, where they are, and maybe even how to feel. Also included are activities that explore how dolphins talk to each other.

Describes how dolphins communicate with each other in squeaks, whistles, and pops.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Much about the communication of dolphins parallels that of humans, and young listeners will be quickly drawn into this fascinating account. From the first illustration that appears to have caught the huge sea creature smiling to the final cross section of its inner workings, text and drawings work in perfect harmony. How these toothed whales search for their babies when they stray, hear amazing distances, measure objects, and even teach obedience to their children is explored in descriptive prose. Lovely page-filling art demonstrates dolphins at work, play, and even in an affectionate pose. Companion pages depict human families in similar activities so that the audience may make reasonable comparisons. Various sounds made by these highly intelligent mammals and their significance are detailed so that young listeners might interact with the text by mimicking these delightful noises to send their own messages. A volume in the "Let's-Read-And-Find-Out About" series, this is a Stage 2 book. These titles are designed to present more challenging concepts for the primary grades. Other Stage 2 works are featured on the back cover. 2003, HarperCollins, Ages 5 to 9.
— Janice DeLong
School Library Journal
Gr 1-2-Beginning readers will enjoy this introductory title on dolphin communication. In addition to the creatures' use of clicks, whistles, and squeaks, the book explains how they use movements to send messages and echolocation to locate objects in the water. Pfeffer does a great job of keeping the concept understandable and comparing human and animal communication, but children may have some difficulty reading the text against the few dark pages. Davie's watercolor illustrations are pleasant and upbeat. The final spread with a labeled cross section of a dolphin is particularly informative.-Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TX Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A Stage 2 entry in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out series seeks to explain the mysteries of dolphin communication. Drawing parallels between human and dolphin interactions, Pfeffer describes dolphin vocabulary and the circumstances under which particular noises and gestures are made. Clear watercolors picture dolphins in diagram and in their natural environment; the varying angles and perspectives keep the blue-green sameness of palette from becoming boring. The text sticks narrowly to its topic, shining in its description of echolocation and its observations about dolphin behavior. It falls down, however, in its explanation of the "hows" of dolphin communication. Although it carefully discusses the role of cranial air sacs in the creation of dolphin vocalization, it's largely mute on the function of the "melon" (carefully labeled in more than one diagram) in the production or reception of sound, leaving a big question mark for curious readers. That there is very little else that goes into such detail on the subject for the age group makes this lack of explanation particularly frustrating; it also makes this, despite its flaws, a reasonable purchase. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Wendy Pfeffer is the author of several titles in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series, including From Tadpole to Frog, What's It Like to Be a Fish?, From Seed to Pumpkin, Sounds All Around, Wiggling Worms at Work, Dolphin Talk, and Life in a Coral Reef. She lives in Pennington, New Jersey.

Helen K. Davie's lovely watercolors have appeared in many children's books, including What Lives in a Shell? by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfield, and Animals in Winter by Henrietta Bancroft and Richard G. Van Gelder. She lives in Templeton, CA.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)