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Domestic Tranquility: A Brief against Feminism

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The principal target of feminist fire in the on-going "gender wars" is not men but traditional wives and mothers so says a lawyer-turned-housewife in this powerful critique of contemporary feminism. With a profound understanding of the quandary of modern women, Carolyn Graglia shows that the cultural assault on marriage, motherhood, and traditional sexuality, rooted in the pursuit of economic and political power, has robbed women of their surest source of fulfillment.
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Overview

The principal target of feminist fire in the on-going "gender wars" is not men but traditional wives and mothers so says a lawyer-turned-housewife in this powerful critique of contemporary feminism. With a profound understanding of the quandary of modern women, Carolyn Graglia shows that the cultural assault on marriage, motherhood, and traditional sexuality, rooted in the pursuit of economic and political power, has robbed women of their surest source of fulfillment.
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Editorial Reviews

David Gelernter
. . .[A] powerful, noble, tragic book. It presents modern femiinism for what it is: institutionalized hatred of motherhood and homemaking. . . .The book is honest, passionate, furious, and not for the faint-hearted. . . .Mrs. Graglia never beats around the bush or plays it safe. . . .This is a revolutionary book. The revolution itself is bound to follow someday. —National Review
Library Journal
Graglia indicts feminism for the demise of the traditional family, the degradation of the homemaker, the spread of venereal disease, the growth of income disparity, and the defeat of the United States in Vietnam (no kidding). Graglia, who holds a law degree from Columbia University, believes that she is a better representative of the 'average woman' than (disproportionately Jewish) feminists are. She recommends a movement to reform 'no-fault' divorce laws to ensure financial security for full-time homemakers (although the old laws were notoriously ineffective), inspired by women who have been 'awakened by transforming sexual experiences including the child-bearing and nurturing that are the fruits of her sexual encounters.' She observes, in passing, that the 'sexual ministrations of [her] husband' do more to make her feel alive than does reading Supreme Court opinions. -- Cynthia Harrison, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
--Scott H. Silverman, Bryn Mawr College Library, Upper Darby, PA
Library Journal
Graglia indicts feminism for the demise of the traditional family, the degradation of the homemaker, the spread of venereal disease, the growth of income disparity, and the defeat of the United States in Vietnam (no kidding). Graglia, who holds a law degree from Columbia University, believes that she is a better representative of the 'average woman' than (disproportionately Jewish) feminists are. She recommends a movement to reform 'no-fault' divorce laws to ensure financial security for full-time homemakers (although the old laws were notoriously ineffective), inspired by women who have been 'awakened by transforming sexual experiences including the child-bearing and nurturing that are the fruits of her sexual encounters.' She observes, in passing, that the 'sexual ministrations of [her] husband' do more to make her feel alive than does reading Supreme Court opinions. -- Cynthia Harrison, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
David Gelernter
. . .[A] powerful, noble, tragic book. It presents modern femiinism for what it is: institutionalized hatred of motherhood and homemaking. . . .The book is honest, passionate, furious, and not for the faint-hearted. . . .Mrs. Graglia never beats around the bush or plays it safe. . . .This is a revolutionary book. The revolution itself is bound to follow someday. -- National Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780965320863
  • Publisher: Spence Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 1/28/1998
  • Pages: 480
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.60 (d)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2003

    A great secular argument for housewives

    I am a Christian and a hopeful homemaker. I have always tried to convince other women of the advantages of returning to traditional family roles. It has been hard for me to prove feminism as the farse I have found it to be. They would always say the same thing 'You just think that because you're a Christian.' Mrs. Graglia's book has proved invaluable to the efforts of the average housewife by providing a secular viewpoint of feminism. Now when my non-Christian friends ask about my beliefs, I can recommend this book to them. This book has allowed me to prove that returning to the home isn't just a 'religious' thing. Graglia points out some of the lies and exagerrations turned out by the feminist community. The fact that she was able to achieve a law degree unhampered by men in a time when feminist say women were not allowed the same educational oppotunites of men serves as invaluable proof that things were not as modern-feminists lead us to believe they were. The only problem I had with the book was that I had trouble understanding some of the terminology in the book (big words). It's not something that can be easily understood by the average reader unless they have a dictionary or something. Another good book I would recommend is 'The Way Home: Beyond Feminism Back to Reality' by Mary Pride. It was published in the eighties and is a little out of date, but is still a good read. You can find it in Barnes and Nobles-out-of print search.

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