Dominant-Minority Relations in America: Linking Personal History with the Convergence in the New World / Edition 2

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Overview

This text looks at inter-group relations from both conflict and assimilationist perspectives and encourages students to see that they are part of the process of dominant-minority interaction.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Drawing from sociology, social history, and personal family histories, Myers (Rowan University) examines racial and ethnic minority groups and their experiences in American society. He offers a theoretical model to explain and predict intergroup relations and applies it to the study of nine minority groups, during different periods. The groups studied are: Native Americans, African Americans, Irish Americans, German Americans, Italian Americans, Jewish Americans, Japanese Americans, Mexican Americans, and Vietnamese Americans. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205482412
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 11/14/2006
  • Series: MySearchLab Series for Sociology Series
  • Edition description: Revised Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 7.48 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

John P. Myers is Professor of Sociology at Rowan University.
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Table of Contents

BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I: Introduction, Other Sources of Oppression, Cross-Cultural Comparisons, and Theory

Chapter 1: Definitions and Concepts

Chapter 2: Other Sources of Oppression in Our Society

Chapter 3: Race and Ethnicity in Other Societies

Chapter 4: Initial Contact, Immigration, and Size of Groups Today

Chapter 5: Constructing a Theoretical Model to Explain Dominant-Minority Relations

Part II: Applying Sociological Theory to Group Experience

Chapter 6: Native Americans

Chapter 7: African Americans

Chapter 8: Irish Americans

Chapter 9: German Americans

Chapter 10: Italian Americans

Chapter 11: Second-Stream Jewish Americans

Chapter 12: Japanese Americans

Chapter 13: Mexican Americans

Chapter 14: Vietnamese Americans

Chapter 15: Arab Americans


COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS


Preface

Part I Introduction, Other Sources of Oppression, Cross-Cultural Comparisons, and Theory

Chapter 1 Definitions and Concepts

Migrant, Immigrant, and Emigrant

Ethnic Group

Race

Racism and Ethnocentrism

Minority Group

Dominant Group

Prejudice and Discrimination

Chapter 2 Other Sources of Oppression in Our Society

Some of the Other Oppressed Groups

Tolerance

Term for Other Groups

Definition of Minority Groups Based on Race and Ethnicity

Logistical Reasons for Focusing on Minority Groups Based on Race and Ethnicity

Reasons for Studying Oppressed Groups Based on Characteristics
Other Than Race and Ethnicity

Minority Group Based on Gender

Minority Group Based on Sexual Orientation

Minority Groups Based on Other Statuses

Minority Groups That Discriminate

Chapter 3 Race and Ethnicity in Other Societies

Apartheid in South Africa — Different Numbers

Northern Ireland — Religion and National Heritage

1930s and 1940s Germany — Religion and Ancestry

Puerto Rico — A Different View of Color

Vietnam — National Origin

Rwamda — Colonial Heritage of Racism

Dominant—Minority Relations throughout the World

Chapter 4 Initial Contact, Immigration, and Size of Groups Today

First Contacts and Immigration

Legislative Changes and Changes in the Social Environment

The Census

The Size of Groups

Chapter 5 Constructing a Theoretical Model to Explain Dominant-Minority Relations

The Question

An Overview of the Approach

Assimilation, Pluralism, Functionalism, and Conflict

Functionalism and Assimilation

Functionalism and Ideology

The Conflict Perspective and Minority Group Theory

Conflict and Assimilation: A Single Model

Questions to Ask Based on the Model

Family Background Projec

Part II Applying Sociological Theory to Group Experience

Chapter 6 Native Americans

Overview

The Dominant Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that the Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 7 African Americans

Overview and Comparison to Native Americans

The Dominant Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that the Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 8 Irish Americans

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans

The Dominant Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that the Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 9 German Americans

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and Irish Americans

The Dominant Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that the Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 1 0 Italian Americans

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, Irish,
and German Americans

The Dominant Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that the Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 1 1 Second-Stream Jewish Americans

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans,
and Other First- and Second-Stream Immigrants

The Nature of the Initial Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and Other Minority Groups

Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Gentile Groups to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 1 2 Japanese Americans

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans,
and Other First- and Second-Stream Immigrants

The Nature of the Initial Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and of Other Minority Groups

The Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 1 3 Mexican Americans

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans,
and Other First- and Second-Stream Immigrants

The Nature of the Anglo Group’s
Initial Conflict Position

The Responses of the Minority Group

Tactics Used by the Dominant Group to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established, and the Amount of Power that Community Generated

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 1 4 Vietnamese Americans

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans,
and Other First- and Second-Stream Immigrants

The Initial Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and of Other Groups

Responses of the Vietnamese and Community Building

The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Chapter 15 Arab Americans

Overview: Unique, Ironic, and Complex

Immigration Histoy: Two Cohorts

Comparison to Other Minority Groups

The Nature of the Dominant Group’s Initial Conflict Position

The Response of the Minority Group: Peddlers and Community Builders

Ongoing Dominant Group Tactics Used to Maintain Dominance

The Extent the Minority Group Community Was Separate and
Established
The Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing

Appendix--Basics of Sociology

Basic Definitions

Methods

Theoretical Perspectives

References

Index

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