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Don Quixote (AKA Don Quijote de la Mancha)
     

Don Quixote (AKA Don Quijote de la Mancha)

3.2 69
by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Burton Raffel (Translator)
 

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A translator of Horace, Balzac, Rabelais, and Salvador Espriu, as well as a theorist (The Art of Translating Prose, Pennsylvania State Univ. Pr., 1994), Raffel (Univ. of Southwest Louisiana) undertook the formidable task of translating Cervantes's masterpiece because he was uncomfortable recommending any of the existing translations. There are some real differences here. Raffel has junked the traditional transcription of Cide Hamete, the pseudoauthor, in favor of the less "colonialist" and more authentic Arabic, Sidi Hamid. Proper names that contain puns are explained within square brackets, and footnotes are kept to a minimum. A more vernacular style reigns: The blow on the neck and the stroke on the shoulder that dub Don Quijote a knight are, respectively, a "whack" and a "tap." The women at the inn, usually called "wenches," are "party-girls" or "whores." Sancho dreams that his "old lady" will someday be a queen and that his "kids" will be princes. In the proofs, "Castile" has been misspelled as "Castille," an oversight one would hope to see corrected in the final book. This is a lively alternative to the wide assortment of truly old-fashioned translations. Recommended.-Jack Shreve, Allegany Community Coll., Cumberland, Md.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393037197
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
700
Product dimensions:
3.97(w) x 2.37(h) x 0.63(d)

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Don Quixote (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 69 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
it only had book one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think the translation is great, but it is not the Edith Grossman translation as stated in the Publisher's comments. This translation is by John Ormsby.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are too many typos which make this unreadable.
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pjstodd More than 1 year ago
This is one of those classics that is a must read.
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