Don Quixote (Hacket Edition)

Don Quixote (Hacket Edition)

4.3 35
by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
     
 

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James Montgomery's new translation of Don Quixote is the fourth already in the twenty-first century, and it stands with the best of them. It pays particular attention to what may be the hardest aspect of Cervantes's novel to render into English: the humorous passages, particularly those that feature a comic and original use of language.See more details below

Overview


James Montgomery's new translation of Don Quixote is the fourth already in the twenty-first century, and it stands with the best of them. It pays particular attention to what may be the hardest aspect of Cervantes's novel to render into English: the humorous passages, particularly those that feature a comic and original use of language. Cervantes would be proud. --Howard Mancing, Professor of Spanish, Purdue University and Vice President, Cervantes Society of America

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

I find Montgomery's Don Quixote lively, beautiful, and compelling. While previous translations have tended to use archaisms and sound overly proper, Montgomery finds a nice balance between old and new language. I quickly fell into the flow of the story and forgot that I was reading a translation. --David Lee Garrison, Professor of Spanish, Wright State University

David Quint's Introduction is remarkably comprehensive. It is full of imaginative critical insights and indispensable information, and it is concise and elegant. It furnishes all the fundamental historical, biographical, social, and literary backgrounds. I know of no other work of this type that can match it in comprehensiveness, sophistication, critical insight, and 'up-to-dateness.' --Alban Forcione, Professor of Spanish Emeritus, Princeton University and Columbia University

"The passion with which Montgomery has translated Don Quixote shines through in a translation that is faithful to the language, style, and spirit of the original. The overall quality of Montgomery's translation is excellent; I often found myself engrossed in the novel as if the original language were English, and only when I stopped reading did I realize that I was still reading a translation. I recommend it highly. Quint's fine Introduction provides the reader with a comprehensive literary and historical orientation to the novel that specialists and non-specialists alike will appreciate." --Michael J. McGrath in Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America

Thomas Mann
What a monument is this book! How its creative genius, critical, free, and human, soars above its age!
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
A more profound and powerful work than this is not to be met with...The final and greatest utterance of the human mind.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The highest creation of genius has been achieved by Shakespeare and Cervantes, almost alone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872209596
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/2009
Pages:
896
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 2.10(d)

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The Life of Cervantes

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra was at once the glory and reproach of Spain; for, if his admirable genius and heroic spirit conduced to the honour of his country, the distress and obscurity which attended his old age, as effectually redounded to her disgrace. Had he lived amidst Gothic darkness and barbarity, where no records were used, and letters altogether unknown, we might have expected to derive from tradition, a number of particulars relating to the family and fortune of a man so remarkably admired even in his own time. But, one would imagine pains had been taken to throw a veil of oblivion over the personal concerns of this excellent author. No inquiry hath, as yet, been able to ascertain the place of his nativity;1 and, although in his works he has declared himself a gentleman by birth, no house has hitherto laid claim to such an illustrious descendant.

One author* says he was born at Esquivias; but, offers no argument in support of his assertion: and probably the conjecture was founded upon the encomiums which Cervantes himself bestows on that place, to which he gives the epithet of Renowned, in his preface to Persiles and Sigismunda.2 Others affirm he first drew breath in Lucena, grounding their opinion upon a vague tradition which there prevails: and a third* set take it for granted that he was a native of Seville, because there are families in that city known by the names of Cervantes and Saavedra; and our author mentions his having, in his early youth, seen plays acted by Lope Rueda, who was a Sevilian. These, indeed, are presumptions that deserve some regard, tho', far from implying certain information, they scarce even amount to probableconjecture: nay, these very circumstances seem to disprove the supposition; for, had he been actually descended from those families, they would, in all likelihood, have preserved some memorials of his birth, which Don Nicholas Antonio would have recorded, in speaking of his fellow-citizen. All these pretensions are now generally set aside in favour of Madrid, which claims the honour of having produced Cervantes, and builds her title on an expression? in his Voyage to Parnassus, which, in my opinion, is altogether equivocal and inconclusive.

In the midst of such undecided contention, if I may be allowed to hazard a conjecture, I would suppose that there was something mysterious in his extraction, which he had no inclination to explain, and that his family had domestic reasons for maintaining the like reserve. Without admitting some such motive, we can hardly account for his silence on a subject that would have afforded him an opportunity to indulge that self-respect which he so honestly displays in the course of his writings. Unless we conclude that he was instigated to renounce all connexion with his kindred and allies, by some contempt'ous flight, mortifying repulse, or real injury he had sustained; a supposition which, I own, is not at all improbable, considering the jealous sensibility of the Spaniards in general, and the warmth of resentment peculiar to our author, which glows through his productions, unrestrained by all the fears of poverty, and all the maxims of old age and experience.


From the Hardcover edition.

Copyright 2001 by Miguel de Cervantes

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What People are saying about this

David Lee Garrison
I find Montgomery's Don Quixote lively, beautiful, and compelling. While previous translations have tended to use archaisms and sound overly proper, Montgomery finds a nice balance between old and new language. I quickly fell into the flow of the story and forgot that I was reading a translation. (David Lee Garrison, Professor of Spanish, Wright State University)
Howard Mancing
James Montgomery's new translation of Don Quixote is the fourth already in the twenty-first century, and it stands with the best of them. It pays particular attention to what may be the hardest aspect of Cervantes's novel to render into English: the humorous passages, particularly those that feature a comic and original use of language. Cervantes would be proud. (Howard Mancing, Professor of Spanish, Purdue University and Vice President, Cervantes Society of America)
J. M. Cohen
One of the best adventure stories in the world.
Thomas Mann
What a unique monument is this book!... How its creative genius, critical, free, and human, soars above its age!
Carlos Fuentes
Don Quixote is the first modern novel, perhaps the most eternal novel ever written and certainly the fountainhead of European and American fiction: here we have Gogol and Dostoevsky, Dickens and Nabokov, Borges and Bellow, Sterne and Diderot in their genetic nakedness, once more taking to the road with the gentleman and the squire, believing the world is what we read and discovering that the world reads us.
Alban Forcione
David Quint's Introduction is remarkably comprehensive. It is full of imaginative critical insights and indispensable information, and it is concise and elegant. It furnishes all the fundamental historical, biographical, social, and literary backgrounds. I know of no other work of this type that can match it in comprehensiveness, sophistication, critical insight, and 'up-to-dateness.' (Alban Forcione, Professor of Spanish Emeritus, Princeton University and Columbia University)

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