Overview

Don Quixote has become so entranced reading tales of chivalry that he decides to turn knight errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, these exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote's fancy often leads him astray—he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants—Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together-and together they have haunted ...
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Don Quixote

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Overview

Don Quixote has become so entranced reading tales of chivalry that he decides to turn knight errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, these exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote's fancy often leads him astray—he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants—Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together-and together they have haunted readers' imaginations for nearly four hundred years.

With its experimental form and literary playfulness, Don Quixote has been generally recognized as the first modern novel. This Penguin Classics edition, with its beautiful new cover design, includes John Rutherford's masterly translation, which does full justice to the energy and wit of Cervantes's prose, as well as a brilliant critical introduction by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarriá.

 

Simple retelling of the adventures of the middle-aged Spanish man who imagines himself a knight in armor and goes into the world to battle injustice.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This imposing volume presents the first part of the quest by the beloved Don, whose name stands for chivalry and courage--``The Impossible Dream.'' The book's heavy stock, binding and design all impart an air of style and prestige, reinforced by Bogin's suave translation, which makes good use of abundant dialogue. (The phraseology and vocabulary, however--``erstwhile,'' ``apothecary,'' ``coherence''--will be beyond younger readers.) Though the paintings by Spanish artist Boix are masterfully executed, some lack the sweep expected from this panoramic work; much of the imagery is somewhat pallid, both in tone and emotional impact. And, though the architectural details, period apparel and scenery are all richly evocative, the characters themselves are often small in scale and dwarfed by their stunning surroundings. Nevertheless, the presence of an elegantly produced, picture book version of this classic merits attention and applause. All ages. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-- Cervantes's Don Quixote, the moniker and persona adopted by the addled Senor Quijada , who has read a few too many chivalric romances, hardly needs introduction to adults. However, most young people will have hardly heard him mentioned, much less had any firsthand contact with this larger-than-life literary creation. Bogin has taken some of the more involving, outrageous, and well-known adventures of the knight errant and his squire, Sancho Panza, and put them together into a relatively brief narrative that nonetheless is strikingly true to the tone and style of the Spanish original. Her prose, lively and at times employing modern vernacular to good effect, does full justice to Cervantes's mad Knight of the Sad Countenance. It begs reading aloud, and may well start discussion and contemplation. Boix's illustrations are delicate, detailed, gold-washed watercolors that create a kind of fairy-tale ambience. They will grab readers' attention and imaginations and direct anyone picking the book up to delve into it and to find out what's going on. Taken as a whole, this is a lovely job of bookmaking, providing an examplary introduction to a classic work. --Ann Welton, Thomas Academy, Kent, WA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440673016
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/25/2003
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 1072
  • Sales rank: 375,489
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra was born in Spain in 1547 to a family once proud and influential but now fallen on hard times. His father, a poor barber-surgeon, wandered up and down Spain in search of work. Educated as a child by the Jesuits in Seville, the creator of Don Quixote grew up to follow the career of a professional soldier. He was wounded at Lepanto in 1571, captured by the Turks in 1575, imprisoned for five years, and was finally rescued by the Trinitarian friars in 1580. On his return to Spain he found his family more impoverished than ever before. Supporting his mother, two sisters, and an illegitimate daughter, he settled down to a literary career and had hopes of becoming a successful playwright, but just then the youthful Lope de Vega entered triumphantly to transform the Spanish theatre by his genius. Galatea, a pastoral romance, was published in 1585, the year of Cervantes’ marriage to Catalina de Palacios y Salazar Vozmediano. But it did not bring him an escape from poverty, and he was forced to become a roving commissary for the Spanish armada. This venture, which led to bankruptcy and jail, lasted for fifteen years. Although he never knew prosperity, Cervantes did gain a measure of fame during his lifetime, and Don Quixote and Sancho Panza were known all over the world. Part I of Don Quixote was published in 1605; in 1613, his Exemplary Novels appeared, and these picaresque tales of romantic adventure gained immediate popularity. Journey to Parnassas, a satirical review of his fellow Spanish poets, appeared in 1614, and Part II of Don Quixote in 1615 as well as Eight Plays and Eight Interludes. Miguel de Cervantes died on April 23, 1616, the same day as the death of Shakespeare--his English contemporary, his only peer.
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Don Quixote: A Book that Exceeds Expectations

    Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes is an outstanding novel that engages the reader in ways no other novel has accomplished. The Story is centered on a Middle aged man named Alonzo Quixano, from the region of La Mancha, who enjoys reading books of chivalry. He eventually becomes so obsessed with these stories that he reads so many until he puts it upon himself to become a Knight-errant to defeat the wicked and defend the helpless. He names himself Don Quixote de la Mancha (Sir Thighpiece) and finds himself a nag and names it Rocinante (Hackafore) and swears an oath to Dulcinea del Toboso, a peasant women that he labels as a princess. He convinces his local Sancho Panza to follow him as a faithful Squire, promising to make him a wealthy governor of an isle.
    The book is divided into two separate parts, with Part I being published first and Cervantes later publishing Part II. In the story many of the characters have read Part I, making the story even more interesting and entertaining. Throughout the novel the reader follows Don Quixote and Sancho as they go on many adventures throughout Spain, creating mischief as they run around in their fantasy world. Don Quixote and Sancho go around Spain attacking random citizens for insulting Don Quixote, stealing and committing acts in the name Dulcinea. For every wrong Don Quixote does he makes an excuse that he was blinded by an enchanter and as Sancho takes the heat for his actions. Don Quixote has many famous recognizable adventures such as Don Quixote's attack upon the windmills, mistaking them for giants, or when he is tricked and frees a devious galley slave. Or the time when he sees a herd of sheep moving down the desert, and he mistakes them for an army as he charges and ensures carnage upon the sheep.
    I think this was a outstanding book that kept the reader interested all the way through. Cervantes writing style helps enhance the story as it engages the reader with an different writing style. Personally, I like Part I better than Part II, because throughout Part I Don Quixote is reckless and basically does whatever he wants stating that because he's a knight-errant he can basically do what he wants. While in the Second Part he becomes wiser not striking out when he becomes angry or insulted; not being as crazy and reckless. I would recommend this book to anyone even though it is a long book; it is completely worth it as you read about the comical and enchanting tales of Don Quixote de La Mancha.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2010

    The magic is all in the writing style.

    I was very fortunate to have randomly chosen what I consider to be the best translation, by John Rutherford. Alas, I cannot read Spanish, least of all the 17th-century variety, but I believe that Mr. Rutherford may be capturing the enchantment of the writing itself better than any other. Unfortunately, through a technical glitch B&N readers are not able to compare translations (I would have been so interested to see the one by Tobias Smollett), since only the Edith Grossman one is featured on the web site, regardless of whichever edition the prospective buyer clicks on.

    The Grossman may be the most accurate, but it's also rather dry, more modern, more utilitarian, while the Rutherford is more poetic and a whole lot more fun, though much more archaic in style. Compare just the first paragraph of Chapter I. In Grossman's description of the Don's lifestyle, "He had a housekeeper past forty, a niece not yet twenty." Well, here is Rutherford's version: "He maintained a housekeeper on the wrong side of forty, a niece the right side of twenty..." And on it goes.

    I find that the best way to enjoy this classic is not to look for a gripping plot or high drama, which you are not likely to find -- wasn't that just what drove the old guy crazy in the first place? -- but to pick a translation (or, of course, to read the original, if you are so fortunate) that will captivate you, and let it sail you right through this huge work on a magic carpet of comedic lyricism.

    In any case, this book is a real beauty, a wonderful place to spend your time!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2004

    Don Quixote- A timeless epic

    Don Quixote definitely backs up the claim that Miguel de Cervantes is the best author in the history of Spanish literature. In Don Quixote, Cervantes wonderfully illustrates the idea of romanticism and chivalry by narrating the tale of an old knight. This novel highlights the idea that we all wish we could be knights. We all wish we could fight evil and protect goodness. Don Quixote is persecuted because, unlike the rest of the world, he actually pursues his fantastic dreams of knight-errantry. He decides to go out into the world to do what he thinks is right, and to achieve a little infamy. He acquires a squire named Sancho, and together they have some outlandish adventures. Don Quixote battles with sheep, attacks innocent barbers, and fights with a few evildoers. Don Quixote does some evil things himself, but in his mind, he is the champion for the oppressed. He always maintains that he is in the right, and he always seems happy with this role as hero. Eventually he is forced to resign from fighting evil by Samson the scholar. Samson defeats him in battle, and Don Quixote relinquishes his position as savior of all things good. He seems to experience a catharsis at the end of the novel, when he signs his will 'Alonzo Quijada' instead of 'Don Quixote de la Mancha'. This event hints at the idea that he knew all along what he was doing. He seems to realize that he was not a hero, and that his dreams were crushed. He was wrong though to think he was not a famous knight errant, and it is a shame he died in such a state of mind. It just goes to show that most famous people never become famous in their lifetime, only after they die do they receive the glory they deserve. Even though Don Quixote was a fictional character, that does not mean that he should not receive the same respect as any dead hero. He may not have saved any damsels in distress, or slain any dragons, or killed any wizards; but he did inspire romance in the hearts of readers around the world for almost five centuries. He goes back to La Mancha and dies a sad, unsatisfying death. This is where the novel itself creates some irony. Don Quixote wanted to become a knight, one who is written about in tales of chivalry. What better way to achieve this limelight than to be the main character in a novel that is arguably the best piece of Spanish Literature ever written. Through all of his misadventures and all of his criticisms, he is not so crazy when you think about it. He does become the most famous knight in the world. He does inspire others to follow in his footsteps. Don Quixote de la Mancha could be considered a hero after all, in fact one of the greatest romantic heroes. Cervantes wrote Don Quixote as a satire to the books of chivalry of that time period, but it turned out to be much more than a satire. It turned out to be a novel symbolic of romance and chivalry, the opposite of Cervantes' intention. Now, people who have this same dedication to romance, chivalry, and the fight against evil are described as Quixotic, a testament to an eternal novel, Don Quixote.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2007

    highly entertaining novel

    This novel is very long! Well worth the time and price. Strongly reccomended!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2004

    Deserves one hundred stars

    This novel is towering, an absolute powerhouse. It is also one of the funniest books I have ever read. There are not many books I would have the desire to read again but this is one of them, only for the sheer enjoyment of it. Don Quixote is one of the most original characters ever set on paper. He and Sancho are just hysterically funny. You will enjoy every minute of this novel. If you don't read it, you are missing out.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2001

    DQ: The latest translation

    Absolutely brilliant translation - the only one that has overcome the difficulties of the language and has bothered to and very succesfully transferred Cervantes' wit to our modern-day sense of humour and fun. Very highly recommended if interested in the English version.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2006

    Worthy of its reputation

    A pleasurable book to read,this translation of DON QUIXOTE made the story easy to understand, and for every reason it stands up to its reputaion as the best-loved novel. Confronting the conventions of Spanish society at his time some four hundred years ago, the author wittily and funnily exposes the folies of the time through the adventures , stories and misfortunes of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza.In a broader sense it is the forerunner off other situations where individuals, communities or systems live a complete lie.This is truely an amazing book, one that you won't want to put down once you have started.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Highly recommended

    An exceptional read.

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  • Posted January 4, 2012

    Don Quixote 5 Stars, Barnes and Noble 0 Stars

    1) This book was advertised with the wrong translator.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2009

    Hilarious book - good storytelling

    Don Quixote is a wonderfully funny book about an old man whose brain has dried up because of such immersion in medieval fairytales and is determined to spend the rest of his life as the knight he has dubbed himself. He and his best friend, Sancho Panza, who is not quite as crazy as the protagonist,go out and save the world from what the audience might think is a harmless thing, but is a threat to humanity to Don Quixote.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2005

    This book OWNZ!

    This book was great I really loved it. It only took me about 1 1/2 weeks to read the book. IT IS GREAT! I also recommened other great classics and Left Behind:... Series for all AGES! And I'm only 14 so read this book if I can read it so can YOU!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2003

    Colorfully Written...perfect!

    This book stands out as a very comical and colorful book with some very unique characters and plenty of twists. I just fell in love with Don Quixote and his somewhat silly squire, Sancho Panza. The book itself was extremely well-translated and easy to read. Though I am sure some twists in the book are a little hard to believe (people finding lost loves and brothers in the period of an hour) I think this book most surely keeps readers to the very end! Most novels around this time seem to focus on the fighting rather than the plot, but this encorperates it all very nicely. I loved it, I recommmend it for all age groups; it won't take more than a week to read if you stick with it! :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2002

    Tuesday morning of October 15, 2002

    What I enjoyed about this book is that being a fictional story about a person's life, rather than most books which are more heavily oriented in plot, this book follows the true figure of life. There are characters that we meet, as colorful as two grapes that splash against lime. They enter, they are felt, and then they leave. These character are never heard from again. Such is one of the qualities of life. I appreciated that about the book. I also appreciate how Cervantes handles his comedic techniques. Comedy being truly funny if it is taken seriously by the commedian, Cervantes' characters perform the most absurd actions with complete sincerity and determination. They paint their house with honey as casually as we paint ours with paint. There are too many works that become puppets to an audience because they are there to please, and therefore their characters come accross at times as not complete people but instead as merely a means to an end. While these kind of works can please for a minute, they cannot last for a day. Cervantes demonstrates an immense respect for the intellectual capacities of his readers by simply presenting his characters as who they are. They live their lives for themselves, their actions are for themselves and they are not puppets, and it just happens that their lives are entertaining. These are just some random thoughts on the book. Also, as I did not know that the book was divided into two parts before i read it. I found that the second part of the story made more of a profound effect on me. By not including side stories such as the Captive's Story or The Tale of Ill-Advised Curiosity as in the first part, Cervantes focuses more on the inner workings of his two heroes. In the first part we see their shapes, but in the second part we see their substance. In general, though, i find that there is a balance in this, therefore I cannot complain about either part. I would not have liked one part if not for the other, you might say.

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    Posted October 29, 2008

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    Posted September 18, 2013

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    Posted July 14, 2009

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    Posted October 25, 2008

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    Posted December 1, 2009

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