Done Crabbin': Noah Leaves the River

Done Crabbin': Noah Leaves the River

by Gilbert Byron
     
 

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In his nationally acclaimed The Lord's Oysters, Gilbert Byron told the story of a young boy growing up on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the early twentieth century. Noah Marlin is older now, as Byron takes up his tale of Chesapeake watermen and their families in this sequel to his beloved classic.

In Done Crabbin' Noah's world has begun to change as

Overview

In his nationally acclaimed The Lord's Oysters, Gilbert Byron told the story of a young boy growing up on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the early twentieth century. Noah Marlin is older now, as Byron takes up his tale of Chesapeake watermen and their families in this sequel to his beloved classic.

In Done Crabbin' Noah's world has begun to change as life on the river becomes less important than life in the town. He's shocked to discover his fifth-grade teacher, the yellow-haired Miss Bertie, parked in a buggy on a back road with Doc Beller, but keeps his discovery secret when he remembers Doc's profession. ("I could imagine myself going to him for a small filling, and then he would strap me in his chair—it wasn't worth the chance.") He hears William Jennings Bryan speak beneath the leaking canopy of a Chatauqua tent during a raging thunderstorm, and remarks in passing that a young man on the tent crew would be killed a year later when his biplane crashed in France.

In the end, they all leave the river. Captain Cable trades his illegal 200-pound duck gun for a carpenter's tools. "Grandpappy" abandons his houseboat, spending his last days in the Marlin family home. Noah's father finds a job in a Baltimore shipyard during the World War I shipbuilding boom and, at last, brings the family to the city to join him. And when Noah himself goes off to prep school, he knows that he and his father have left their old lives for good. They would never follow the water again. They are done crabbin'.

The Johns Hopkins University Press

Editorial Reviews

Chesapeake Bay Banner
Mr. Byron... will always be the best writer the Shore has ever produced. Done Crabbin' will not disappoint his readers... A beautifully honed coda to a great symphony... All the old delights of The Lord's Oysters are reprised, and sometimes the focus is that much sharper.

— Helen Chappell

Baltimore Sun

A poignant and lovingly underplayed story of adolescence.

Chesapeake Bay Banner - Helen Chappell

Mr. Byron... will always be the best writer the Shore has ever produced. Done Crabbin' will not disappoint his readers... A beautifully honed coda to a great symphony... All the old delights of The Lord's Oysters are reprised, and sometimes the focus is that much sharper.

Helen Chappell
Mr. Byron... will always be the best writer the Shore has ever produced. Done Crabbin' will not disappoint his readers... A beautifully honed coda to a great symphony... All the old delights of The Lord's Oysters are reprised, and sometimes the focus is that much sharper.
—(Chesapeake Bay Banner )
School Library Journal
Set in Chestertown, a rural area on the eastern shore of Maryland, this collection of short stories covers the period from 1914 through the early years of the first World War, and focuses on a boy, his family, and his community. Noah Marlin grows from age 11 to 14 during the course of these tales, and his adventures will delight readers. The main characters are richly drawn, as are those who appear only briefly. The atmosphere of the small town caught in a time of change is equally well limned. History is brought to life convincingly, and events are woven skillfully into the tale. Each chapter can be enjoyed individually, or savored collectively. --Judy Sokoll, Reston Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801865282
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
10/28/2000
Edition description:
Paperback Edition
Pages:
195
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
Up to 18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Gilbert Byron grew up on Maryland's Eastern Shore, a waterman's son like his young hero. A schoolteacher for twenty-eight years, he began writing full time in 1957 and was the author of eleven books. His beloved classic, The Lord's Oysters, is also available from Johns Hopkins.

The Johns Hopkins University Press

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