Don't Hassel the Hoff: The Autobiography [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Los Angeles Times called him a "counterculture icon," and TV Guide dubbed him one of "TV's Ten Most Powerful Stars," but true aficionados simply call him "The Hoff."

Don't Hassel the Hoff follows David Hasselhoff's phenomenal career, from his earliest childhood role in Peter Pan to his latest adventure, starring in Mel Brooks's Tony award-winning musical, The Producers. There is no better time to celebrate Hasselhoff's life and a career ...
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Don't Hassel the Hoff: The Autobiography

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Overview


The Los Angeles Times called him a "counterculture icon," and TV Guide dubbed him one of "TV's Ten Most Powerful Stars," but true aficionados simply call him "The Hoff."

Don't Hassel the Hoff follows David Hasselhoff's phenomenal career, from his earliest childhood role in Peter Pan to his latest adventure, starring in Mel Brooks's Tony award-winning musical, The Producers. There is no better time to celebrate Hasselhoff's life and a career that continues to grow and thrive. As the star of the extremely popular classic television shows, "Baywatch" and "Knight Rider," Hasselhoff is an international mega-star, with platinum album sales and starring roles on Broadway and London's West End.

As this fascinating memoir reveals, there's more to this handsome superstar than great hair, and legs that look good while running down a beach. "The Hoff" is also a smart, caring man with a huge heart.

"This book is my opportunity to print something from my heart, to tell the truth about what happened to me on the long and winding road from Baltimore to Baywatch to Broadway - and beyond. And the truth is not to be found in tabloid stories but in my actions: I am a good father and tried to be a good husband. I love people and the emotional rollercoaster that goes with human relationships. I love all the bewildering, crazy and wonderful things that life has to offer. This book is about my successes and my failures, my strengths and my weaknesses. And, above all, it is about the hope contained in the Knight Rider slogan: "One man can make a difference." --David Hasselhoff

Full of behind-the-scenes looks at Hasselhoff's television series, celebrations of his proudest moments, and the truths about his struggles with relationships and alcohol, Don't Hassel the Hoff is both highly entertaining and deeply personal, making this an engrossing page-turner from start to finish.

Long live "The Hoff."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429901062
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 5/15/2007
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 883,517
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.06 (d)
  • File size: 11 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


David Michael Hasselhoff was born on July 17, 1952, in Baltimore, Maryland.  He is best known for his roles as Michael Knight in Knight Rider, and Mitch Buchannon in Baywatch. Fulfilling his original dream to be a singer, David made “Looking for Freedom” a massive hit in Germany in 1989, just as the Berlin Wall came down.  The accompanying album went gold and triple platinum, topping the charts for three months.  Baywatch ran for eleven years and is said to be the most-watched show in syndication worldwide.  In 1990, Cosmopolitan’s editor, Helen Gurley Brown, chose him for her magazine’s twenty-fifth anniversary issue.  In October 2000, Hasselhoff conquered another childhood dream when he took the starring role in Jekyll & Hyde on Broadway.  In 2004, he played the demanding role of Billy Flynn in Chicago in London’s West End.  His cameo appearance in The SpongeBob Squarepants movie, released in 2004, was followed by roles in Dodgeball with Ben Stiller and Vince Vaughn, and most recently in the Adam Sandler film, Click.  His videos “Hooked on a Feeling” and “Jump in My Car” have been downloaded by millions of people from the internet site YouTube.com. In early 2007, he began his role as the flamboyant and flop-prone director Roger De Bris in the Las Vegas production of Mel Brooks’s The Producers.  He continues his reign as a judge on the hit TV show America’s Got Talent. He resides in Southern California with his two daughters.
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Read an Excerpt

Prologue: My True Story

'My image is someone else's perception of what my life is like. It's not the truth.'


Broadway - Opening Night

Plymouth Theatre, 31 October 2000


The stage manager asked me, 'Are you all right?'

'Yes, I'm okay. Now remember - I'm going to come off stage in between scenes and you're going to tell me who I am.'

'Yes - I'll say, "Now you're Jekyll" or "Now you're Hyde".'

'You'll give me my first line and you'll point me in the right direction?'

'Yes. Are you sure you're okay?'

I was far from okay. After forty years in show business, my childhood dream was about to come true. It had been a long journey. Knight Rider had made me famous. Baywatch had made me rich. But Broadway had always been my dream.

When I had stepped on to the sidewalk that night I could see my name in lights over Times Square. At eight o'clock a hush would fall in the Plymouth Theatre, the overture would begin and I would step on to the stage as the lead in Jekyll and Hyde: The Musical. This would be the greatest night of my career, the pinnacle of my success.

And I was terrified.

I was terrified because I was not only an actor playing a role, I had something to prove. I had to prove I was more than a guy who talked to a car, that I was more than a guy in red Speedos running in slow motion across a beach. I had to prove my talent to the world. More importantly, I had to prove it to myself. Walking along Forty-Fifth Street, I remembered the saying, 'Luck is being prepared for opportunity when it presents itself.' The question was, 'Was I prepared?'

At the theatre, I looked in the dressing-room mirror and said to myself, 'What is wrong with you? Why do you put yourself through this? Are you crazy? You're in the hardest role on Broadway, singing fourteen songs, playing not one character but two. You're opening after only five weeks of rehearsals? You must be crazy.'

Yes, I was crazy - crazy with excitement, tension and fear. From the age of nine, I had dreamed of starring in a Broadway musical. And when it didn't happen for many years I had lived by these words, 'Never, never, never give up.'

Now I had made it - except I didn't know if I would be able to speak, let alone sing. I said a prayer, 'God, just get me through the first note.'

Then the orchestra started playing, the curtain went up and I caught a look at the audience and I realised this was not a dream - this was Broadway. My parents Joe and Dolores were there, my wife Pamela Bach was there with our younger daughter Hayley, my manager Jan McCormack, my lawyers Eric Weissler and Alan Wertheimer, my business managers Bob Philpott and Peter Stoll, my press agent Judy Katz, my friends, my peers in show business, including many other Broadway and Hollywood stars - all of them were there. My mother's words came back to me, 'You can do it, David, you were born for the stage.'

The first notes came out of my mouth, 'Lost in the darkness, silence surrounds you.' The fear dissolved. The adrenaline took over and I was off and running. I didn't miss a beat the whole evening, at least I don't think so - to be honest, I couldn't remember a thing about the show except a standing ovation and a tremendous sense of relief. We had a huge party at the Russian Tearoom to celebrate my opening night all those years after I had first dreamed of appearing in a Broadway musical.

This book is my opportunity to print something from my heart, to tell the truth about what happened to me on the long and winding road from Baltimore to Baywatch to Broadway - and beyond. And the truth is not to be found in tabloid stories but in my actions: I am a good father and have tried to be a good husband. I love people and the emotional rollercoaster that goes with human relationships. The truth is I love all of the bewildering, crazy and wonderful things that life has to offer.

Let's get this out of the way: my image is someone else's perception

of what my life is like. My buddy Chuck Russell, director of The Mask, Eraser and The Scorpion King, says, 'They don't call them congratulators - they call them critics. They put themselves on a higher plane than everybody else. Their job is to criticise but inevitably the audience decides.'

The fact is that the critics have made a great number of assumptions about me, most of them untrue, while the tabloids have never missed a chance to stir up trouble whenever possible. Because I worked with the most beautiful women in the world on Baywatch, they assumed I must have had the greatest job in the world. This was true up to a point, although nobody knew that the sand was hotter than hell and the water was toxic; that every week we had to bow to the dictates of what was perceived as a horrible sexist show that was becoming more and more popular around the world. Every week we had a girl coming to work with a different breast size, or a different tattoo that had to be covered up, or a different personal crisis that had to be resolved.

I'd look out of my trailer when the assistant director shouted, 'Rolling!' and the girls would drop their towels and I'd go, 'Thank you, God.' It was assumed by the critics that I was bedding them all. But I didn't have a great desire to mess around because if I cheated on my wife I knew I would also be cheating on my children and myself. I loved my wife, I loved being married and I worshipped my children.

When I was touring with my band or filming on location, the guys would stay out all night and come back with stories about the girls they'd met in the bars and clubs, and I would grin and they'd say, 'What about you? What did you do last night?'

And I'd say, 'I had the minibar.'

Girls would be outside my trailer door clamouring to get in and I would drink the minibar. My assistants got all the girls and I got all the minibars. Many minibars later, it caught up with me. I needed to drink greater quantities to get a buzz. In the end, I got very close to checking out, permanently. Over the years I had this recurring dream that I wanted to get busted, I wanted to stop. I wanted this whole drama to end. I just didn't know how to stop it. I was running away from my problems and it was killing me. The truth is that I tried to save the world and forgot to save myself.

When people stop me in the street today, nine times out of ten it's because of Knight Rider. It was a show about heroes, about a man who could change things, about a man who helped others. The Knight Rider slogan was 'One man can make a difference'. I truly believe that I got the role of Michael Knight for a reason. I was given a power that could be used in a positive way, far greater than anyone could imagine, to help sick and terminally ill people, mainly children who watched the Knight Rider programme and believed in its hero.

The person who made me realise that helping others was my purpose in life was Randy Armstrong, a fifteen-year-old leukaemia patient who visited the Knight Rider set at Universal Studios in 1983. After his death, I received a letter from him begging me to help other sick children forget their pain. The letter came with a photograph of Randy in his casket dressed in the Knight Rider hat and jacket that I had given him as mementos of his visit. From that moment on, I felt it was a spiritual calling and maybe it explained why I had been chosen as the Knight Rider. It was a much bigger responsibility than playing the hero in a TV show; I actually had to be a hero. My quest, my calling, had begun. From then on, we opened the doors of the Knight Rider set to any suffering child.

On my travels I visited the children's wards of hospitals in forty countries: I rarely left a country without visiting sick children. It became a mission. The children had absolute faith in the Knight Rider; he was their hero and he could make them smile and forget their pain, if only for a few moments. I've held little children as they faced death with a courage that had to be seen to be believed.

There have been many disconcerting and humbling experiences. One Christmas Eve my mother called me. 'David, a boy was knocked down on a crosswalk,' she said. 'Somehow his parents got my phone number - will you go and see him?'

The hospital was right around the corner from my home in Los Angeles. The child was in a coma, oblivious to his surroundings. I asked the parents what they would like me to do. They said: 'Maybe you could hold his hand and the darkness won't seem so dark.' After being with the boy for half an hour, I turned to the parents and said: 'Can I ask you a question? How do you retain your faith in God when something like this happens to your son?'

They said: 'Because you came.'

'What?'

'David, we know there is no hope for our child but we prayed that his hero would come and, David, you came.'

I fought back the tears and stayed with that boy for another hour. He came out of his coma, looked up and said: 'Michael Knight' and gave me a hug. Twelve hours later he passed away.

It has always been the children who are the true heroes and to this day they are still my most loyal fans. SpongeBob rules!



Today I am listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as 'the Most Watched TV Star on the Planet', thanks to Knight Rider and Baywatch, pretty funny with a name like 'Hasselhoff'. I had never perceived Hasselhoff as a name with charisma and power like 'Steiger'; it was more like 'Humperdinck' - funny and a bit of a liability but now I love it. Alexandra Paul, my best friend on Baywatch, once said: 'You can't really be an American and not know the name David Hasselhoff.' On The Simpsons the first words out of Lisa Simpson's mouth were 'David Hasselhoff'. Why? Because Jeff Martin, head writer on David Letterman's Late Show and later, The Simpsons, met me at a wrap party where I posed for pictures with him and signed an autograph for his mother. Ten years later, he told me Lisa's line was a nod to me.

This book is also about my travels and some of the amazing people I have met along the way. I was at Madison Square Gardens for a big fight when somebody tickled my ear. 'You're pretty, Knight Rider,' a voice said, 'but you're not as pretty as me.'

I didn't have to turn around to know it was Muhammad Ali. Then another voice said: 'Yeahhhh, buddy, but we love you.'

When I turned around, I saw that Ali was sitting next to Lou Rawls.

Another time, I bumped into Sidney Poitier, star of one of my favourite movies, Lilies of the Field, in a New York elevator. 'My God, you look like a teenager,' he said. 'Don't you ever age - what's your secret?' I was amazed he even knew who I was.

But fame is a double-edged sword: you get the best table in a restaurant but everybody watches you eat. And there is a dark side.

F. Scott Fitzgerald said, 'Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.' I really wasn't happy. I had nightmares about losing my marriage and ending up alone. I had nightmares about getting arrested and being in jail. Even though I had achieved worldwide success, there was an emptiness inside me, an aching loneliness. I secretly and desperately wanted to be found out. I wanted someone to make the decision for me; I wanted to get busted.

It took God's angels to bring me to the brink of disaster and death to get my attention so that I could finally stop drinking and walk away from a marriage that was slowly killing me. And when it happened I felt ten years younger, ten years cleaner. It had taken me so long because I was afraid I would let my public down. I was afraid I'd lose my power, my career and the respect of my friends, but they were all still there, especially the power - the power of love, the power of positive thinking, the power to go forward along God's chosen path. It was a power I had learned at home from the time of my earliest memories.

This book is about my successes and my failures, my strengths and my weaknesses. And, above all, it is about the hope contained in the Knight Rider slogan: 'One man can make a difference.'

Copyright © 2006 by David Hasselhoff. All rights reserved.





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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    Jaysoar, author of Jaysoar's sty and Hawkpool and the disaster

    Good job! Please read my story at blood wing all results for Hawkpool and the disaster and jaysoar all results fo Jaysoar's story!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2013

    To KT

    Sorry for posting the bad reviews about this book. I was just mad at your reviews for my book, Brambleblood's Story, and i thank you for changing them. So i will delete my bad reviews on your book. - Wavekit.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Willowsong

    Awesome!!!please read my story at spray results 1,2,3,4,ect.chapter 12 just came out

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Ok

    Ok i guess...use more descrition

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Amazing!!!

    Amazing!!!! Please write more! :D ~€loudstar

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Azulfire

    Amazing! Luv it! <3 Can u read my story at rp library? Thanks! ~Azulfire

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Flightsong's Battle~ Chapter One

    Flightsong's Battle~ Chapter One: "The kits! They're coming!" Softheart cried as she fell down. Immeaditly cats rushed over to help her. Strikeclaw, her mate, was one of them. Softheart screamed as she was carried to the nursery. Bravestar, the leader, stood near the entrance. Riverpaw, the med cat apprentice, padded up to him. "You have always been a loyal brother," she meowed," It must be hard for you." Bravestar nodded, still listening to his sister cry in pain. "I trust your mentor, Puddlejump," he replied," I just don't want to lose her." Riverpaw padded in front of him. "Softheart will live. You won't lose her, the same story won't happen to her," Riverpaw assured. Bravestar's parents were killed in a badger attack as his mom was giving birth. The kits died along with them. It was a great loss, hard on the leader. For a short time, Bravestar had Smallstep in charge. He was wise with his actions, and everyone agreed it was a good idea. Bravestar didn't want to lose his sister. "Bravestar, Smallstep has checked everywhere for dangers," a warrior reported," There is none that could possibly happen. And I believe you are an uncle now." Bravestar's ears shot upward. Softheart had stopped screaming. He listened, waiting to hear some indication that she was okay. Tiny meows were heard. Bravestar sighed, knowing his sister was okay. "Thank you," he meowed to the warrior. He was about to go in when Riverpaw called him. "I need to tell you something. Privately," she called. Bravestar padded to his den. "What is it, Riverpaw?" he asked, eager to see the kits. "StarClan has spoken to me this night," she meowed," I fear it may be bad." Bravestar looked at her. StarClan normally did not speak to apprentices of great dangers. "What have they said?" he asked, worried. Riverpaw stared at him. "Darkness has reached the darkest soul. Only can the shadow song destroy it." ****** by KT. I am going to write a chapter everyday. This story has been told to me by Flightsong. I am not a stalker. Please leave helpful comments. Thnx!

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    Posted December 31, 2011

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    Posted May 16, 2011

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