Don't Lick the Dog: Making Friends with Dogs [NOOK Book]

Overview


Meeting a new dog is exciting, but it can also be scary. This humorous how-to manual shows kids the best ways to interact with unfamiliar dogs, providing helpful tips about all sorts of dog behavior. Children often don’t understand what dogs’ actions mean and can misinterpret a threatening signal for a friendly one and vice versa. Kids and parents will return to Wendy Wahman’s playful illustrations again and ...
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Overview


Meeting a new dog is exciting, but it can also be scary. This humorous how-to manual shows kids the best ways to interact with unfamiliar dogs, providing helpful tips about all sorts of dog behavior. Children often don’t understand what dogs’ actions mean and can misinterpret a threatening signal for a friendly one and vice versa. Kids and parents will return to Wendy Wahman’s playful illustrations again and again for useful reminders: Slow Down. Stay very still. And remember, don’t lick the dog!

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

This colorful picture book provides humorous information on how to make friends and interact with dogs. The tips are easy and useful, but are delivered in rhyme with an uneven meter that feels forced: "You're so polite!/You can pet these five,/but Maddie might bite." Or, "Before you give a treat to Kate/make your hand into a plate/Lick, lick, lick!/Too much is ick!/It's all right to say, ENOUGH/to all that/sloppy kissy stuff." The exaggerated, loose-line, cartoon art, filled with bright, digital hues, has a fragmented feel. The woman giving advice to the children wears black, pointy gloves and boots, resulting in a harsh, didactic tone. The concept and message are good ones and it's clear that careful thought and consideration went into the informative tips, but the execution is not entirely successful. Stephanie Calmenson's May I Pet Your Dog? (Clarion, 2007) and Elizabeth Verdick's Tails Are Not for Pulling (Free Spirit, 2005) are better alternatives.-Anne Beier, Hendrick Hudson Free Library, Montrose, NY

Kirkus Reviews
Eye-popping colors and exaggerated shapes with sharp edges are the defining characteristics of Wahman's distinctive illustrations for this how-to on meeting new canine friends. She offers stylized dogs with swirling lines, curly fur and a couple of impossibly long tongues that humorously refer back to the volume's title. A few lines of rhyming text on each spread offer simple tips for getting along with unfamiliar dogs, such as giving dogs their own space and staying away from a dog that is growling. Several ways to make friends with dogs are also explained, with preferred methods of offering a treat or petting a dog explained in a manner that young children can understand. This effort might not work for young children who already have a fear of dogs, as there are a couple of references to dogs who bite, and several illustrations of growling dogs are on the scary side, but overall it provides a jazzy, unusual introduction to the subject for children who don't have dogs of their own. (Informational picture book. 3-6)
From the Publisher

Praise for Don't Lick the Dog:

“I’m passionate about helping children (and their parents) understand how best to safely interact with dogs, and this book perfectly encapsulates my philosophies on the matter in a really fun and engaging way.”—Victoria Stilwell, host of It’s Me or the Dog

"In this vividly illustrated and smartly written tutorial, Wahman runs through a set of rhyming tips for any child encountering a potential four-legged friend… No matter the mood, the illustrations strike a perfect balance, using a spiky style reminiscent of papercraft atop bright, single-color backgrounds… Gentle self-defense suggestions close this unique offering."—Booklist

"Eye-popping colors and exaggerated shapes with sharp edges are the defining characteristics of Wahman's distinctive illustrations for this how-to on meeting new canine friends."—Kirkus Reviews

"This colorful picture book provides humorous information on how to make friends and interact with dogs."—School Library Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466820357
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 4/27/2009
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,285,639
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Wendy Wahman

WENDY WAHMAN lives in Washington State with big poodles, old cats, and a husband named Joe. She’s won many awards for illustration, but her greatest joy is loving the two-, three-, and four-legged animals she has known. This is her first children’s book.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 24, 2009

    A little interspecies understanding goes a long way

    If your grandchildren need help learning to get along with your dogs, this is a great book to have. Fun to read, but with a helpful message that gives you a tool for helping dogs and kids build happy relationships.

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  • Posted May 22, 2009

    Creative, Fun, Informative

    Don't Lick the Dog is a vibrant, creative, and memorable way to teach children how to socialize with dogs of all temperments. The unique and edgy format, both in text and illustration, is a departure from the tradional, holding the reader's attention by avoiding the predictable. The useful, informative lessons on dog psychology are imparted in a bold break from conventional metered rhymes and muted illustration. This book will appeal to a wide audience of readers, as an enjoyable source of source of practical information, presented in an original package.

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  • Posted May 21, 2009

    Doggone Good!

    Great illustrations, bold color, and wonderful advice. Don't miss "Don't Lick the Dog." It's one "tail" that will have you wagging for more!

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  • Posted May 21, 2009

    Two Paws Up for "Don't Lick the Dog!"

    I was lucky enough to watch Wendy Wahman read her book "Don't Lick the Dog" recently to a class of kindergartners. They were enthralled by the colorful, wacky pictures and the clever rhymes. They hung on every word and watched as the kids in the story learned how to treat dogs with respect while standing up for their own space. Sometimes you just have to turn your back on a dog and sometimes even a little growler like Maddie comes around to be cuddled. The book starts out with "Dogs, dogs, everywhere!" and the pages are crammed with color, whimsey and wordplay. There is something new to find on every page with each reading, especially good, solid information on how to get along with a new dog, or even an old one. (I tried turning my back on my dog after reading this and he actually came over to have his ears scratched - a first!) I asked some of the kids what they learned and they told me how to make their hand a plate or a fist (you'll have to read the book), where to scratch a dog and where NOT to scratch a dog. Plus, they certainly knew "Don't Lick the Dog!" A great book, a fun read and kids love it.

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  • Posted May 21, 2009

    Great book!

    The illustrations are great, something you can look at over and over and always see something new. As an adult I learned lots of new things which I now do when approaching strange dogs, like curling my fingers under and offering my hand. Kids will benefit a lot from this book. But mostly its fun and visually fascinating.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2009

    Perfect for adults and children!

    We all know an adult or child with a fear of dogs and this book, more than any other I've read, speaks to a solution for that fear. It's graphically unique and delightful, perfect for reading out loud and discussion afterwards, and the recommendations couldn't be more clear or appropriate. I can't recommend it highly enough!

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  • Posted May 21, 2009

    woof woof! we like it!

    We just loved all the different types of dogs. We own 2 big dogs and got this book to give to friends who have kids who are scared when they come over. Hopefully they will learn to relax!

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  • Posted January 27, 2009

    Getting a New Pet?

    The rhyming text and colorful pictures alone will capture the attention of readers but this is no simple story! The story told would be the perfect compliment to a family with young children who has just gotten or is considering buying a puppy for the first time, providing tips to share with youngsters about how to stay safe with dogs:<BR/><BR/>curling fingers into the palm so the dog isn't tempted to bite<BR/>gently stroke the dog's back instead of patting/hitting at him<BR/>turning your back and crossing your arms if the dog acts like it wants to attack<BR/>The story, in a sense, reminds children of the golden rule, treat others as you wish to be treated, because "just like you and just like me, dogs have personalities" and we need to respect the different personalities and be cautious of how a dog may react when meeting new people/situations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2009

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