Don't Say Aint

Don't Say Aint

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by Irene Smalls, Colin Bootman
     
 

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In the 1950s, Dana struggles to live in two worlds—her Harlem neighborhood and the advanced school she attends—while staying true to herself. Irene Smalls and Colin Bootman team up in this heart-warming story of friendship, integration, opportunity, and hard choices.

Overview

In the 1950s, Dana struggles to live in two worlds—her Harlem neighborhood and the advanced school she attends—while staying true to herself. Irene Smalls and Colin Bootman team up in this heart-warming story of friendship, integration, opportunity, and hard choices.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this tale set in 1957 Harlem, a girl learns to reconcile the ideas of her new integrated school with her home life. "Spare, lifelike oil paintings credibly convey the era and the heroine's emotions," wrote PW. Ages 5-10. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781570913822
Publisher:
Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
02/04/2004
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.54(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Irene Smalls grew up in Harlem where Double Dutch was her favorite game. She graduated from Cornell University with a B.A. in black studies and from New York University with an M.B.A. She is the author of 15 books for children, including KEVIIN AND HIS DAD (Little, Brown). Irene Smalls performs and lectures at schools and conferences around the country. She lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Don't Say Aint 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
School is a subject that is familiar to most children. And, attending a school outside of one's neighborhood is a subject that is becoming more and more familiar to youngsters today. At times, that situation presents adjustments and even problems. Such is the spot young Dana finds herself in. Our story is set in Harlem in the 1950s. Dana loves her neighborhood, and her friends. But, when she scores in a high percentile on a citywide test she is sent to a newly integrated advanced school. What a change! Some of the students at the new school are less than accepting, and even her teacher comments on Dana's language usage, saying, 'Do not use `ain't' in school.' When Dana attempts to change the way she talks then her old friends in the neighborhood withdraw wondering if Dana now thinks she is better than they are. It's a challenge for Dana to find her place in two very different worlds, both of which are changing. There are good lessons for all in this candid, affirming story illustrated with colorful oil paintings.