Don't Shoot: One Man, A Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America

( 4 )

Overview

"Part jeremiad, part gripping crime thriller,"* Don't Shoot is David M. Kennedy's chronicle of his decades-long crusade to solve one of America's most pressing and shameful social problems. Kennedy, who engineered the "Boston Miracle" in the 1990s, cutting youth homicide by two-thirds at the height of the crack epidemic, reveals the history and the strategy behind his commonsense yet revolutionary approach to ending crime. He has refined an approach in which everyone-gang members, drug dealers, cops, and ...

See more details below
Paperback
$15.25
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$18.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $8.99   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$15.99 List Price

Overview

"Part jeremiad, part gripping crime thriller,"* Don't Shoot is David M. Kennedy's chronicle of his decades-long crusade to solve one of America's most pressing and shameful social problems. Kennedy, who engineered the "Boston Miracle" in the 1990s, cutting youth homicide by two-thirds at the height of the crack epidemic, reveals the history and the strategy behind his commonsense yet revolutionary approach to ending crime. He has refined an approach in which everyone-gang members, drug dealers, cops, and neighbors-comes together in a giant community meeting, an intervention and an affirmation of a shared desire for safety and peace. The proof is in the miraculous results. Don't Shoot offers a bold way forward in combating one of our country's most intractable social problems. (*Boston Globe)

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In a matter-of-fact, street-smart style, coming from years of working with police officers, gang members, and community workers in some of America's most dangerous neighborhoods, Kennedy, professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, explains his remarkably effective strategies for combating violent crime. When research showed that only a disproportionately small number of criminals commit most of the most serious crimes, Kennedy had the police identify gang members on parole or probation and urge them to come to a meeting. At the gathering were members of the gangs' families, community service providers, and the police, who explained the legal risks the perpetrators faced (most gang members didn't know)—and demanded that shootings stop. If the killings continued, the perpetrators would not receive another chance; instead, they'd be met with severe punishment, and their entire gang would be targeted. When this program, called Operation Ceasefire, was first tried in Boston in the '90s, violence plummeted by almost two-thirds, and Kennedy chronicles the difficulties in implementing the program to meet the needs of 50 other cities. Warning against the country's "orgy" of incarceration, which disproportionately targets black males in America's most vulnerable neighborhoods, this heartfelt book shows what can happen when police, gangs, and communities come together to address some of America's most intractable social problems. (Oct.)
Kirkus Reviews

An unlikely criminal-justice pioneer revisits his innovative, immensely successful crusade against youth homicide in America's worst neighborhoods.

Kennedy (Criminal Justice/John Jay Coll.) didn't set out to dedicate his career to crime, much less the seemingly insurmountable problem of gang-and-drug related violence plaguing America's cities and stumping even the most seasoned law-enforcement units. Rather, as an aspiring writer straight out of college, he took a job constructing teaching cases for Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. An early assignment on problem-oriented policing sent him to Los Angeles' beleaguered Watts neighborhood, one of many hit hard by the 1980s crack epidemic. Kennedy was struck by the devastating violence he witnessed and, as he plunged further into researching the problem, the horrifying trends it represented. Quickly, a few things became clear. First, guns, drugs and gangs held the keys to the downward spiral. Second, in a shockingly optimistic and humane perspective, that the real problem was, in essence, a massive misunderstanding; that is, that cops and communities wanted, at the base level, the same things, and could be brought together to work toward them. Kennedy and a few key colleagues launched what became known as the Boston Miracle (a name not sanctioned by Kennedy, who emphasized that hard work, rather than divine intervention, created the results). With a massive communication effort, including an astonishing set of forum meetings which actually brought gang members and police officers together, Kennedy's team made clear to the community their goal of stopping violence and valuing the young lives that had previously gone unnoticed. Results were swift and unprecedented—youth homicide rates halved, then quartered, and broad changes were made to communities. More importantly, the solution was not specific to Boston. Over the years, Kennedy has cloned his experiment in cities across the country, from smaller communities like Stockton, Calif., to, with significantly more effort and issues, meccas of urban blight like Baltimore.The problem has in no way been eliminated—and Kennedy emphasizes the drastic consequences when the programs falter—but progress is undeniable.

A valuable text—not just for the solution, but also for the refreshing philosophy behind it.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781608194148
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 378,578
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

David M. Kennedy is the director of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control and a professor of criminal justice at John Jay College. Kennedy has received two Webber Seavey awards from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, two Innovations in American Government awards from the Kennedy School of Government, and a Herman Goldstein Problem-Oriented Policing Award. His work has been used as a model or source for safety and drug intervention initiatives by the Clinton and Bush administrations, and by the Bureau of Justice. Kennedy lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Boston: Street Knowledge, Street Sense 25

Operation Ceasefire 44

Building Out I 76

Baltimore: Politics, Resistance, Obstruction 101

Across the Race Divide 124

High Point: Truthtelling and Reconciliation 156

Building Out II 185

Stopping It 207

Cincinnati 232

Now 267

Acknowledgments 287

Notes 291

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This imposing work documents his 17 year effort to bring sanity

    This imposing work documents his 17 year effort to bring sanity to law enforcement's attempts to stop gun killings and open drug markets in various "hot "communities throughout our nation. More than law enforcement's heavy hand was involved...: the purveyors of violence, the gang bangers, thugs and wannabees, were involved as were the communities through moral voices (pastors, streetworkers, doctors and others) and "influentials" of these thugs (Aunties, moms, girl friends, siblings and incarcerated old heads or street legends). Finally Social Service providers were there and participating to provide training, addiction treatment or social services as needed and job opportunities. The thugs had to ask though and they had to stop the violence or face real criminal justice. It was part of the deal. From what Kennedy termed, the Call-in. Ask Freddie Cardoza from Boston, one of the first of the thugs given the treatment for ignoring the program's offer in Operation Ceasefire. He felt the heavy weight of a Federal indictment and conviction for POSSESSING one bullit, as his two prior convictions made him the perfect example for the other gunslingers in Boston. He went away for 20 years on that charge and is still doing the time as of today. The thugs got the message and the shootings stopped (at least for a while). This new approach worked and it traveled to other areas with different cultures, different problems and worked there as well. Check it out and visit the website. These folks are making changes for the better and we can all be proud of the work these Americans are doing. Our streets and parks can be made safe for our citizens. No saints here, only hard, dedicated workers. God Bless Them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    This important book explains the strategy used in several cities

    This important book explains the strategy used in several cities that has drastically cut the number of killings by coordinating the actions and reactions between all the forces of law and the forces of lawlessness. It's not an easy read, but when the strategy is applied, it works. It saves lives as well as improving the quality of lives, neighborhoods and cities.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)