Dooby Dooby Moo

Overview

Sure, they can type, but did you know that Farmer Brown’s animals can sing? This favorite story is now available as a book and CD package!

Duck and his friends are at it again. But this time they’re pooling their considerable resources to win a local talent show, because first prize is a trampoline!

The ...

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Overview

Sure, they can type, but did you know that Farmer Brown’s animals can sing? This favorite story is now available as a book and CD package!

Duck and his friends are at it again. But this time they’re pooling their considerable resources to win a local talent show, because first prize is a trampoline!

The cows want to sing.
The sheep want to sing.
The pigs want to...dance. Dance?

And Duck? Duck just wants to win that trampoline. But first he’ll have to handle Farmer Brown.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
With a trampoline promised as the grand prize, this year's local talent show is attracting lots of animal buzz. With the cows, sheep, and pigs all jockeying for position, Duck is eager to join the fray. Unfortunately, Farmer Brown has other ideas. A frolicking farmyard tale from the pair who cave us Click, Clack, Moo and Giggle, Giggle, Quack.
From The Critics
First prize at the county fair's talent show is a trampoline -- a must-have for any farm animal, of course. So Duck, the scheming star of Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, and his fellow barnyard crooners and hoofers must outwit Farmer Brown in order to win it. Comic writing and zany illustrations -- imagine pigs doing an interpretive dance -- showcase the winning talents of Cronin and Lewin. (ages 3 to 7)
The August 2006 issue of Child magazine
Publishers Weekly
What do you get when a bunch of farm animals decide to enter a talent contest to win... a trampoline? Sounds like the latest joke at the watercooler, but it's just Cronin and Lewin (of Click, Clack, Moo fame) at it again, with an off-the-wall tale poised to deliver giggles galore. Here they reprise their bovine beauties crooning la Sinatra. But they are not the only contestants of the barnyard persuasion: the pigs practice an interpretive dance and Duck belts out his rendition of "Born to Be Wild" in performances sure to amuse young and adult readers alike. While children will enjoy the pure silliness of singing animals alone, older readers will appreciate Cronin's tongue-in-cheek asides, such as the footnote about the trampoline being "slightly used," along with a legal disclaimer. Lewin's expansive brush strokes pay further tribute to this tall tale of animals that sing and dance behind closed barn doors. By story's end, the animals have returned to their regular routines, except for the extra "boing" in their song-whose source comes clear in Lewin's closing image of the animals enjoying the well-earned prize. Fans will hope for many more farmyard adventures from this dynamic duo. Ages 3-7. (Aug.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Hapless Farmer Brown falls victim to the clever Duck and his barnyard friends once again. An ad in the daily paper for a talent show at the county fair open to all catches Duck's eye. Hoping to win the first prize of a trampoline, the cows and sheep brush up on their singing, and the pigs plan an interpretive dance. Suspecting something is afoot, Farmer Brown keeps a close eye on the animals, even going so far as to wear a disguise. He can never catch them at their game. On the day of the contest all the animals are in rare form: the sheep belt out a heartfelt rendition of "Home on the Range," the cows sing "Twinkle Twinkle," and the pigs just plain fail to perform. It is Duck's over-the-top performance of "Born to be Wild" that gets a standing ovation. As usual Farmer Brown misses the whole thing, but that night he hears strange sounds from the barn, each of which ends with a BOING! All the wit and charm that has been evident in all the other adventures of these resourceful barnyard animals has been captured in this latest hilarious endeavor. Farmer Brown continues to scowl and suspect but as always is cleverly outwitted. The cows' Dooby, dooby, moo and the sheep's Fa la, la baaaa are easily translated to their songs, making this a fun read aloud. Children will squeal with delight at the last page, which shows the animals jumping with wild abandon on their newly won trampoline. This is a winner any way you look at it. Originally a picture book, nothing is lost when this story is turned into a board book. It should bring lots of smiles to little ones. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-When Duck discovers an ad in the paper announcing a talent show at the county fair (first prize, a slightly used trampoline), Farmer Brown's animals are unstoppable. The cows and sheep concentrate on their singing while the pigs work on interpretive dance. How the suspicious farmer could ever confuse all this noise with routine snoring is a bit of a stretch, but the hilarious late-night practice scenes inside the barn will help readers make the leap. At the talent show, the cows and sheep impress some of the judges, but lack of sleep has the pigs truly snoring when it is time to perform. Fortunately, Duck steps in to save the day with a winning version of "Born to Be Wild." After the talent show, Farmer Brown suspects nothing until he hears "boings" coming from the barn. Comical watercolor illustrations provide the punch lines to many jokes within the well-paced text. Some of the sophisticated humor will go over the heads of most children, especially the witty footnotes that pepper the story. However, like Click, Clack, Moo (2000) and Giggle, Giggle, Quack (2002, both S & S), this story makes a great read-aloud, and fans of the series will be ecstatic to see another episode of mischief in the barnyard.-Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Those self-actualized animals down at Farmer Brown's return for a welcome new caper. Their leader, Duck-who reads the farmer's newspaper daily-notes that the upcoming county fair will feature a talent show. Bent on first prize (a "slightly used" trampoline), he directs the cows' rehearsals of "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star," the sheep on "Home on the Range" and the pigs' slumber-inducing interpretive dance. Since Farmer Brown can't trust this crafty herd, he loads them into the truck, parks and heads off for the fair's free barbecue. The animals-naturally-enter the contest and perform, with decidedly mixed results, and it's Duck who once more brings home the bacon. When Farmer Brown resumes snooping outside the barn that night, he hears "Dooby, dooby BOING! Fa la, la, la BOING! Whacka, whacka BOING." Yet again, Lewin's watercolors delightfully extend Cronin's text. Her gestural black brushstrokes enliven everything from a bristly welcome mat to the animals' clandestinely pleased expressions as their duped farmer crowds them into the fair-bound truck. (Duck, of course, rides shotgun.) Great fun. (Picture book. 3-7)Those self-actualized animals down at Farmer Brown's return for a welcome new caper. Their leader, Duck-who reads the farmer's newspaper daily-notes that the upcoming county fair will feature a talent show. Bent on first prize (a "slightly used" trampoline), he directs the cows' rehearsals of "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star," the sheep on "Home on the Range" and the pigs' slumber-inducing interpretive dance. Since Farmer Brown can't trust this crafty herd, he loads them into the truck, parks and heads off for the fair's free barbecue. The animals-naturally-enter the contest andperform, with decidedly mixed results, and it's Duck who once more brings home the bacon. When Farmer Brown resumes snooping outside the barn that night, he hears "Dooby, dooby BOING! Fa la, la, la BOING! Whacka, whacka BOING." Yet again, Lewin's watercolors delightfully extend Cronin's text. Her gestural black brushstrokes enliven everything from a bristly welcome mat to the animals' clandestinely pleased expressions as their duped farmer crowds them into the fair-bound truck. (Duck, of course, rides shotgun.) Great fun. (Picture book. 3-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781481414562
  • Publisher: Little Simon
  • Publication date: 8/26/2014
  • Edition description: Book and CD
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,062,148
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Doreen Cronin

Betsy Lewin is the Caldecott Honor-winning illustrator of Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type and its sequels, Giggle, Giggle, Quack; Duck for President; Dooby Dooby Moo; and Thump, Quack, Moo; in addition to a number of other picture books, including So, What’s It Like to Be a Cat? and Where Is Tippy Toes? She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

George Guidall has recorded more than 800 unabridged novels and is the recipient of two Audie Awards for excellence in audiobook narration. His 40 year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie award for best performance Off-Broadway, and frequent television appearances.

Doreen Cronin is the author of many bestselling picture books, including Click, Clack, Boo; Dooby Dooby Moo; Thump, Quack, Moo: A Whacky Adventure; Bounce; Wiggle; Duck for President; Giggle, Giggle, Quack; and the Caldecott Honor Book Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Visit her at DoreenCronin.com.

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