Doomed to Repeat: The Lessons of History We've Failed to Learn

( 1 )

Overview

An engrossing and fact-filled compendium of timeless lessons we keep forgetting—over and over and over . . .

It is said that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. And so we have. Time and again humankind has overcome great turmoil only to ignore hard-earned wisdom at the very worst moment. Borrowing more from Groundhog Day than D-day, Bill Fawcett illuminates some of the predicaments, both infamous and obscure, that have vexed us for centuries—and just may...

See more details below
Paperback (Original)
$12.06
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$14.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $3.99   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Doomed to Repeat: The Lessons of History We've Failed to Learn

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

An engrossing and fact-filled compendium of timeless lessons we keep forgetting—over and over and over . . .

It is said that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. And so we have. Time and again humankind has overcome great turmoil only to ignore hard-earned wisdom at the very worst moment. Borrowing more from Groundhog Day than D-day, Bill Fawcett illuminates some of the predicaments, both infamous and obscure, that have vexed us for centuries—and just may explain many of today's global conflicts. Through fourteen chapters, Doomed to Repeat is chock-full of trivia, historical oddities, and fascinating insights into our most popular mistakes.

Learn about:

  • What really stops terrorists
  • How inflation and recession helped set the stage for the Nazis to take power
  • What really ended the Great Depression and whether it could work today
  • What history predicts for the final results of the Arab Spring
  • Swine flu, bird flu, and the chances of another worldwide plague
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The weight of history hangs heavy as Fawcett (How to Lose a Battle) examines a slew of today’s social and economic issues in light of their prior manifestations. In a range of insightful and accessible essays, the author dwells on everything from why Afghanistan is easy to invade but impossible to hold, to the dangers of inflation, millennia of terrorism, and the rise and fall of the middle class. Of special note is his lengthy and foreboding comparison of America to Rome, and his examination of how superpower nations inevitably collapse ends on a surprisingly hopeful note. The choice of topics is somewhat imbalanced: of fourteen essays, six are concerned with economic issues, while Afghanistan, Egypt, Britain, and sub-Saharan Africa each get a chapter, and though the writing sometimes lapses into a dry, academic tone, the material is primarily aimed at the casual reader, making this something of a primer on pressing current events and their historical precedents. The underlying message—that “we need to learn from the past to solve today’s problems”—is an optimistic cliché by this point, but it’s sobering to consider how we have yet to take it seriously. Fawcett’s entertaining and educational collection makes it clear it’s high time we listen—and listen closely—to history. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
In this search for guidance from the past, pop historian Fawcett (Trust Me, I Know What I'm Doing: 100 More Mistakes that Lost Elections, Ended Empires, and Made the World What It Is Today, 2012, etc.) surveys disparate issues ranging from terrorism and pandemics to unemployment and recessions. However, any book that attempts to derive lessons from history must first get the facts right. This one is replete with falsehoods and fantasies that startle and amaze. Among the author's more astonishing assertions: Ethiopia successfully repelled the Italian invasion of 1935; in 1915, Turkish troops killed 27,000 Armenians in Monastir, Tunisia; on October 9, 2002, the stock market crashed, and Yahoo stock lost 90 percent of its value in less than two days. The first assertion is sadly false, while the other two are pure fabrications. Perceptive readers will quickly lose confidence in any of the author's purported statements of fact and thus, with any conclusions that might be drawn from them. Even when Fawcett correctly recognizes a historical trend, the lessons he perceives are generally both obvious and useless. Afghanistan is a fractured nation that resists foreign occupiers and central government. Africa must overcome tribalism and corruption if it is to prosper. Hyperinflation can be ruinous. And the even less helpful: "What history seems to give us today are questions, not solutions." Fawcett sees America going the way of the British and Roman empires if we don't, well, do something, like strengthen the middle class. How? Neither history nor Fawcett seems to know. Superficial analysis and a rash of factual errors combine to drain this volume of any value it might otherwise have had.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062069061
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/12/2013
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 325
  • Sales rank: 632,132
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Fawcett is the author and editor of more than a dozen books, including You Did What?, It Seemed Like a Good Idea . . . , How to Lose a Battle, and You Said What? He lives in Illinois.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)