The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell

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Overview

In the early 1950s, distinguished novelist Aldous Huxley ingested mescaline and wrote about the experience in The Doors of Perception. For Timothy Leary, the Merry Pranksters, Jim Morrison (who named the Doors after the book), and a whole generation of psychedelic seekers, Huxley's account became an essential touchstone.

Today, Huxley's insights into the psychedelic experience remain as fresh and provocative as ever. By taking mescaline, he hoped to experience, from the inside ...

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Overview

In the early 1950s, distinguished novelist Aldous Huxley ingested mescaline and wrote about the experience in The Doors of Perception. For Timothy Leary, the Merry Pranksters, Jim Morrison (who named the Doors after the book), and a whole generation of psychedelic seekers, Huxley's account became an essential touchstone.

Today, Huxley's insights into the psychedelic experience remain as fresh and provocative as ever. By taking mescaline, he hoped to experience, from the inside out, the sort of visionary mysticism that inspired artists such as William Blake. What Huxley discovered was something else altogether. Instead of a luminous inner world, he found himself transcending his own consciousness and becoming one with the outer world, where everything -- the desk, the chair, the flower vase -- "shone with an Inner Light and was infinite in its significance."

Huxley concluded that although psychedelic drugs did not offer enlightenment as to life's ultimate purpose, they could open the door to self-transcendence, offering a sacramental vision of everyday reality akin to the Catholic concept of "gratuitous grace." Lambasting his contemporaries' lack of curiosity about mescaline's potential as a spiritual catalyst, he worte, "The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same man who wnet out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance but better equipped to understand the relationship of words to hings, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend."

Huxley explores the mind's remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness.

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Editorial Reviews

San Francisco Chronicle
Huxley's challenge is forcibly put...the ideas are freshly and prodigally presented.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9788087888001
  • Publisher: David Rehak
  • Publication date: 8/20/2013
  • Pages: 114
  • Sales rank: 105,685
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.24 (d)

Meet the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

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Read an Excerpt

The Doors of Perception



It was in 1886 that the German pharmacologist, Louis Lewin, published the first systematic study of the cactus, to which his own name was subsequently given. Anhalonium Lewinii was new to science. To primitive religion and the Indians of Mexico and the American Southwest it was a friend of immemorially long standing. Indeed, it was much more than a friend. In the words of one of the early Spanish visitors to the New World, "they eat a root which they call peyote, and which they venerate as though it were a deity."

Why they should have venerated it as a deity became apparent when such eminent psychologists as Jaensch, Havelock Ellis and Weir Mitchell began their experiments with mescalin, the active principle of peyote. True, they stopped short at a point well this side of idolatry; but all concurred in assigning to mescalin a position among drugs of unique distinction. Administered in suitable doses, it changes the quality of consciousness more profoundly and yet is less toxic than any other substance in the pharmacologist's repertory.

Mescalin research has been going on sporadically ever since the days of Lewin and Havelock Ellis. Chemists have not merely isolated the alkaloid; they have learned how to synthesize it, so that the supply no longer depends on the sparse and intermittent crop of a desert cactus. Alienists have dosed themselves with mescalin in the hope thereby of coming to a better, a first-hand, understanding of their patients' mental processes. Working unfortunately upon too few subjects within too narrow a range of circumstances,psychologists have observed and catalogued some of the drug's more striking effects. Neurologists and physiologists have found out something about the mechanism of its action upon the central nervous system. And at least one professional philosopher has taken mescalin for the light it may throw on such ancient, unsolved riddles as the place of mind in nature and the relationship between brain and consciousness.

There matters rested until, two or three years ago, a new and perhaps highly significant fact was observed. Actually the fact had been staring everyone in the face for several decades; but nobody, as it happened, had noticed it until a young English psychiatrist, at present working in Canada, was struck by the close similarity, in chemical composition, between mescalin and adrenalin. Further research revealed that lysergic acid, an extremely potent hallucinogen derived from ergot, has a structural biochemical relationship to the others. Then came the discovery that adrenochrome, which is a product of the decomposition of adrenalin, can produce many of the symptoms observed in mescalin intoxication. But adrenochrome probably occurs spontaneously in the human body. In other words, each one of us may be capable of manufacturing a chemical, minute doses of which are known to cause profound changes in consciousness. Certain of these changes are similar to those which occur in that most characteristic plague of the twentieth century, schizophrenia. Is the mental disorder due to a chemical disorder? And is the chemical disorder due, in its turn, to psychological distresses affecting the adrenals? It would be rash and premature to affirm it. The most we can say is that some kind of a prima facie case has been made out. Meanwhile the clue is being systematically followed, the sleuths — biochemists, psychiatrists, psychologists — are on the trail.

By a series of, for me, extremely fortunate circumstances I found myself, in the spring of 1953, squarely athwart that trail. One of the sleuths had come on business to California. In spite of seventy years of mescalin research, the psychological material at his disposal was still absurdly inadequate, and he was anxious to add to it. I was on the spot and willing, indeed eager, to be a guinea pig. Thus it came about that, one bright May morning, I swallowed four-tenths of a gram of mescalin dissolved in half a glass of water and sat down to wait for the results.

We live together, we act on, and react to, one another; but always and in all circumstances we are by ourselves. The martyrs go hand in hand into the arena; they are crucified alone. Embraced, the lovers desperately try to fuse their insulated ecstasies into a single self-transcendence; in vain. By its very nature every embodied spirit is doomed to suffer and enjoy in solitude. Sensations, feelings, insights, fancies — all these are private and, except through symbols and at second hand, incommunicable. We can pool information about experiences, but never the experiences themselves. From family to nation, every human group is a society of island universes.

Most island universes are sufficiently like one another to permit of inferential understanding or even of mutual empathy or "feeling into." Thus, remembering our own bereavements and humiliations, we can condole with others in analogous circumstances, can put ourselves (always, of course, in a slightly Pickwickian sense) in their places. But in certain cases communication between universes is incomplete or even nonexistent. The mind is its own place, and the places inhabited by the insane and the exceptionally gifted are so different from the places where ordinary men and women live, that there is little or no common ground of memory to serve as a basis for understanding or fellow feeling. Words are uttered, but fail to enlighten. The things and events to which the symbols refer belong to mutually exclusive realms of experience.

To see ourselves as others see us is a most salutary gift. Hardly less important is the capacity to see others as they see themselves. But what if these others belong to a different species and inhabit a radically alien universe? For example, how can the sane get to know what it actually feels like to be mad? Or, short of being born again as a visionary, a medium, or a musical genius, how can we ever visit the worlds which, to Blake, to Swedenborg, to Johann Sebastian Bach, were home? And how can a man at the extreme limits...

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