Dora's Chicks

Dora's Chicks

by Julie Sykes, Jane Chapman
     
 

It’s time for breakfast and Dora’s Chicks are nowhere to be found. Dora searches the entire barnyard, and one by one her chicks appear in the strangest places! Kids will love searching for all six chicks right along with Dora in this sequel to Dora’s Egg.  See more details below

Overview

It’s time for breakfast and Dora’s Chicks are nowhere to be found. Dora searches the entire barnyard, and one by one her chicks appear in the strangest places! Kids will love searching for all six chicks right along with Dora in this sequel to Dora’s Egg.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
The eggs from Dora's Eggs have hatched! In Dora's Chicks by Julie Sykes, illus. by Jane Chapman, a mother hen searches the barnyard for her wayward offspring, hidden in the hay and blending with the buttercups. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
One day an egg rolls down a hill, cracks open and out pops a baby crocodile. But where is his mother? A classic tale of a child in search of its mother, Where's My Mommy? combines energetic illustrations with simple text. As Little Crocodile meets various animals in the jungle, he always asks, "Are you my mommy?" The animals reply by asking in turn if he can do the things they do and make the noises they make. "Can you swing from a tree like me?" asks the Monkey. "Can you do this?" Tiger asks as he roars. Each time, Little Crocodile can only "snap" in reply. Finally, he comes upon an entire crowd of snapping crocodiles. At last, he has found his mother! This fun story will not only enchant young children, but will also reinforce concepts of sorting and matching as young children decide whether or not Little Crocodile has found his mother with each encounter. 2002, Tiger Tales,
— Leah Hanson
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-A fat, white hen, first introduced in Dora's Eggs (Little Tiger, 1997), leaves the nest "for a minute" to find breakfast for her six chicks, and when she returns they are gone. She scours the farmyard and discovers one or more of them with other animals. Dora reclaims her brood and explains that chickens do not eat the way pigs, ducks, horses, or birds do. However, children unfamiliar with barnyard animals will not understand what is happening. For example, the piglets are not shown nursing even though Dora explains that that is how Penny Pig feeds her babies. The math is too complicated for preschoolers. While the illustrations are large and bright, the animals are not expressive and Dora and the chicks are an unusual looking flock with thick, feathered legs. For counting and finding animals, Charlotte Pomerantz's One Duck, Another Duck or Nancy Tafuri's Have You Seen My Duckling? (both Greenwillow, 1984) can't be beat, and there are many other farm-animal books from which to choose.-Marlene Gawron, Orange County Library, Orlando, FL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589250154
Publisher:
ME Media, LLC
Publication date:
03/15/2002
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.80(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD330L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >