Double-Dare to Be Scared

Double-Dare to Be Scared

5.0 1
by Robert D. San Souci, David Ouimet
     
 

What’s creepier than being lost in the woods all alone? How about being lost in those woods, and sensing that you’re not alone?

Robert D. San Souci, popular author of Dare to Be Scared, has spun another thirteen masterful tales to keep nightlights burning across the country. Fans of his first book will be thrilled to find not only the same spirit of

Overview


What’s creepier than being lost in the woods all alone? How about being lost in those woods, and sensing that you’re not alone?

Robert D. San Souci, popular author of Dare to Be Scared, has spun another thirteen masterful tales to keep nightlights burning across the country. Fans of his first book will be thrilled to find not only the same spirit of scary fun, but even deeper, darker twists and surprises. Newcomers will discover something for every (daring) palate, with stories that range from campfire grabbers to unsettling chillers, and combine elements of folklore and pop culture.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-The creators of Dare to Be Scared (Cricket, 2003) once again combine their talents to present deliciously frightening tales. As in the first book, San Souci uses elements of urban legend and folklore to weave powerful and suspenseful yet age-appropriate stories that youngsters will revisit, finding new meaning with each reading. Malicious ghost children, demon cooties seeking revenge, haunted houses, and hungry creatures leap from the pages and into readers' imaginations with spine-tingling results. In one particularly eerie selection, a silent-movie character that terrified audiences in the early 20th century is resurrected and plans to continue scaring people by using the Internet. Each story is about 10 pages long, just right for sharing aloud or for independent reading during short time periods. The narratives are plot focused, leaving many details to the imagination. Ouimet's scratchboard illustrations create a surreal mood and are strategically placed for the most impact. Dare and Double-Dare are ideal choices for graduates of Alvin Schwartz's "Scary Stories" series (HarperCollins).-Molly S. Kinney, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
San Souci follows up Dare to Be Scared (2003) with 13 more eerie tales, original but laced with tried and true locales, motifs, and dreadful fates. He leaves his monsters a bit vague around the edges, so that readers can fill in details: after a scary "Campfire Tale," young Michael hears a twig snap right behind him; a spidery cloud of "Grey" turns out to be a mind-bending alien; a sinister pair of "Mountain Childers" always talk with their mouths closed; an old carpet in an abandoned house suddenly turns into a tongue. Victims are mostly third- to fifth-graders, and the author tones down explicit gore to the occasional rolling head or shoe with a foot still inside. Still, enhanced by Ouimet's macabre tableaux (finished art not seen), these tales rate high in chill factor for any age. Warmly recommended for solitary, late-night, under-the-covers reading. Bwaa-ha-ha. (Short stories. 10-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812627169
Publisher:
Cricket Books
Publication date:
06/09/2004
Series:
Dare to Be Scared Series
Pages:
170
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.74(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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Double-Dare to Be Scared 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it is a good book almost as good as the first.(dare to be scared)