The Double Eagle [NOOK Book]

Overview

They are the most valuable coins on earth . . .
Only a handful still exist, each one worth millions . . .
Now they have vanished from an impenetrable
fortress . . . and the killings have begun.

Somehow, impossibly, someone has invaded Fort Knox and stolen five of the world's last remaining Double Eagles -- the $20 gold coin ordered ...

See more details below
The Double Eagle

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

They are the most valuable coins on earth . . .
Only a handful still exist, each one worth millions . . .
Now they have vanished from an impenetrable
fortress . . . and the killings have begun.

Somehow, impossibly, someone has invaded Fort Knox and stolen five of the world's last remaining Double Eagles -- the $20 gold coin ordered destroyed by President Roosevelt during the Great Depression. Now, one has resurfaced during an autopsy in France -- in the stomach of a murdered priest.

Disgraced FBI agent Jennifer Browne needs to recover the priceless coins to resuscitate her stalled career -- and her investigation is pointing her toward Tom Kirk, a brilliant international art thief who wants to get out of the game. But Kirk's only chance for freedom -- and survival -- is to find the missing coins, joining Browne, an unlikely ally, on a breakneck race across the globe and into the lethal heart of a shocking conspiracy of greed and power . . . and death.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Robert Ludlum meets The Da Vinci Code in James Twining's electrifying debut novel. It's an edge-of-your-seat thrill ride, set in the international art and antiquities marketplace, that deals with a missing set of priceless coins -- and the individuals who will do anything to possess them.

When an Italian priest is found murdered in Paris with an exceedingly rare American coin -- the 1933 Double Eagle -- lodged in his throat, the FBI is called in to investigate. Special Agent Jennifer Browne, trying to prove her competency after making a deadly mistake in her last mission, is assigned to the case. Though the handful of gold coins still in existence are supposed to be safely locked away in Fort Knox, when Browne visits the Kentucky depository, she discovers that all the coins are gone! When she finds a possible link between the Fort Knox theft and a rogue CIA agent reported dead ten years earlier, she tracks down "Tom Kirk" -- now an infamous art thief -- in London, and together they begin to unravel the elaborate puzzle. But as the pieces slowly fall into place, the two begin to realize that they're up against not only a ruthless criminal mastermind but also much more powerful -- and malevolent -- agencies…

Fans of recent bestsellers like Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason's The Rule of Four and The Third Translation by Matt Bondurant will devour this adept blend of fact and fiction -- a high-speed (and highly intellectual) world-hopping thriller à la Ludlum, Ken Follett, and Frederick Forsyth. In a word: Sensational! Paul Goat Allen

Publishers Weekly
Making his thriller debut after a career as a London entrepreneur, Twining consciously deals in clich s: 007-ish bad guys, contrived plot mechanisms and Perils of Pauline-style hairsbreadth escapes. He has a nice feel for them. Tom Kirk is a rogue ex-CIA operative who, after a profitable career as an international jewel thief, is attempting to go legit; Jennifer Browne is a foxy FBI special agent trying to work her way back into the good graces of the service after accidentally killing a fellow agent. When a 1933 $20 Double Eagle gold coin turns up in the belly of a dead ex-priest-turned-fence--the rest of the run had officially been listed as destroyed--Jennifer discovers that five other "unofficial" specimens are missing from Fort Knox. Meanwhile, Kirk's final heist, of a priceless Faberg egg, is catching up with him, and the FBI dispatches Jennifer to London with the gold coin to offer Kirk a deal of immunity if he will help recover the missing coins. The mismatched pair manage to have the remaining coin stolen from them; its trail then leads from London to Paris, Amsterdam and Istanbul. Despite a highly theatrical and overly protracted finale, this is an auspicious beginning for a fledgling series. Agent, George Lucas at Inkwell Management. (Sept. 1) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
At the center of this debut novel by former investment banker Twining is the most expensive gold coin ever sold, the 1933 Double Eagle. Described as the "Holy Grail" of numismatics (the study or collecting of coins), this rare treasure has been embroiled in intrigue and controversy since a handful of Double Eagles escaped melting when FDR recalled all gold currency and bullion. Twining's obvious research pays off as we are treated to a compelling fusion of real historical events and modern thrills. His references to notable art and artifacts, especially pieces lost to art thieves, lend an air of veracity to the entire novel. When a Double Eagle coin believed to be one of five stolen from Fort Knox is recovered from the body of a slain priest, CIA operative turned art thief Tom Kirk and FBI agent Jennifer Browne are thrown together to recover the coins. Neither can afford to trust the other-and neither can afford to fail. Kirk, an action hero as adroit and charismatic as Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt, will appear in a series of books planned by Twining. Recommended for most popular fiction collections.-Laura A.B. Cifelli, Fort Myers-Lee Cty. P.L., FL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In Twining's debut thriller, Fort Knox could use a few more guards. The arsenal is robbed, to the tune of $40 million. Back in the '30s, things were tough-tough enough for FDR to take the country off the gold standard, which the president had hoped might bring the Great Depression to its knees. In effect, gold became illegal, and soon, five solid-gold Double Eagle coins wound up in a Fort Knox vault to keep them out of opportunistic hands. Over the next few decades, each one's value skyrocketed to millions of dollars. The FBI, CIA and other agencies charged with various aspects of guardianship move into action to recover the treasure. Enter Special Agent Jennifer Browne ("strikingly beautiful . . . milky brown skin . . . curly black hair that just kissed her bare shoulders.") Strikingly beautiful she may be, but Special Agent Browne has in the recent past blotted her copybook by shooting to death, albeit accidentally, an FBI colleague. But if she cracks the case of the purloined coins, redemption is hers. Now enter cat burglar Tom Kirk, described by those in a position to judge as the best thief who ever rappelled down the side of a building. Tom, though, is burnt out and wants to retire. On the theory that it takes one to catch one, the determined special agent is dispatched to London with a sweetheart deal for the peerless Kirk if he'll help recover the illegal eagles. But in a world where Double Eagles make double-dealing obligatory, not a single thing goes easily. Lifeless and derivative lead characters gum up the plot: Jennifer is petulant when she ought to be feisty, and Tom is more insipid than intrepid.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061808586
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 217,824
  • File size: 647 KB

Meet the Author

James Twining was born in London but spent much of his childhood in Paris. After graduating from Oxford University with a first class degree in French Literature, he worked in Investment Banking for four years before leaving to set up his own company which he then sold three years later, having been named as one of the eight "Best of Young British" Entrepreneurs in The New Statesman magazine. James lives in London with his wife and two daughters.


Visit www.jamestwining.com


Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Double Eagle


By James Twining

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2005 James Twining
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060762098

Chapter One

Fifth Avenue, New York City
16 July -- 11:30 p.m.

Gracefully he fell, his body arcing in one smooth movement out from the side of the building and then back in, like a spider caught in a sudden gust of wind as it dropped on its thread, until with a final fizz of the rope through his gloved hand he landed on the balcony of the seventeenth floor.

Crouching, he unclipped the rope from his harness and flattened his back to the wall, his dark, lithe shape blending into the stained stone. He didn't move, his chest barely rising, the thin material of his black ski mask slick against his lips. He had to be sure. He had to be certain that no one had seen him on the way down. So he waited, listening to the shallow breaths of the city slumbering fitfully below him, watching the Met's familiar bulk retreating into shadow as its floodlights were extinguished.

And all the while, Central Park's dark lung, studded with the occasional lights of taxis making their way between East and West Eighty-sixth Street, breathed a chilled, oxygenated air up the side of the building that made him shiver despite the heat. Air heavy with New York's distinctive scent, an intoxicating cocktail of fear, sweat, and greed that bubbled up from subway tunnels and steam vents.

And although a lone NYPD chopper, spotlight primed, circled ever closer and the muffled scream of sirens echoed up from distant streets through the warm air, he could tell they were not for him. They never were. Tom Kirk had never been caught.

Keeping below the level of the carved stone balustrade, he padded over to the large semicircular window that opened onto the balcony, its armored panes glinting like sheet steel. Inside, he could see that the room was dark and empty, as he knew it would be. As it was every weekend during the summer.

A few taps on each of the hinges that ran down the side of the right-hand window and the bolts popped out into his hand. Then carefully, so as not to break the alarmed central magnetic contact, he levered the edge of the window away from the frame until there was a gap big enough for him to slip through.

Once inside, Tom swung his pack down off his shoulder. From the main compartment he took out what looked like a metal detector -- a thin black plate attached to an aluminium rod. He flicked a switch on the top of the plate and a small green light on its smooth surface glowed into life. Keeping completely still, he gripped the rod in his right hand and began to sweep the plate over the arid emptiness of the floor in front of him. Almost immediately the light on the back of the plate flashed red and he paused.

Pressure pads. As predicted.

Moving the plate slowly over the spot where the light had changed color, he quickly identified an area that he circled with white chalk. Repeating this procedure, he worked his way methodically across the room, moving in controlled, precise movements. Five minutes later and he had reached the far wall, a trail of small white circles in his wake.

The room was exactly as the photos had shown it and had the distinctive smell of new money and old furniture. A large Victorian partners' desk dominated, a masculine marriage of polished English oak and Italian leather that reminded him of the interior of a 1920s Rolls-Royce. Behind the desk, the wall was lined with what looked like the remnants of a once substantial private library, now presumably scattered across the world according to auction lots.

The two sidewalls that ran up to the window were painted a sandy gray and symmetrically hung with a series of drawings and paintings, four down each wall. He did not have to look closely to recognize them -- Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Klimt. But Tom was not there for the paintings, nor for the decoy safe he knew lay behind the third picture on the left. He had learned not to be greedy.

Instead, he picked his way back through the chalk circles to the edge of the silk rug that filled the floor between the desk and the window, its colors shimmering in the pale moonlight. With his back to the window, he gripped one corner of the rug and threw it back. Underneath, the wood was slightly darker where it had been shielded from the bleaching sun.

Kneeling, he placed his gloved hands flat on the floor and slid them slowly across the dry wooden surface. About two feet in front of him, the tips of his fingers sensed a slight ridge in the wood. He moved his hands apart along the ridge, until he reached what felt like a corner on both sides. Placing his knuckles on these corners, he leaned forward with all his weight.

With a faint click, a two-foot square panel sank down and then sprang up about half an inch higher than the rest of the floor. It was hinged at the far end and he folded the panel back on itself so that it lay flat revealing a gleaming floor safe.

The safe manufacturing and insurance industries cooperate on the security ratings of safes. Manufacturers regularly submit their products to independent testing by the Underwriters Laboratory, or UL, who in return issue the safe with a Residential Security Container Label that allows the insurers to accurately determine the relevant insurance premium.

The safe that Tom had revealed had, according to its freshly affixed label, been rated TXTL 60. In other words, it had been found to successfully resist entry for a net assault time of 60 minutes. It was one of the highest ratings that UL could give.

Even so, it took Tom just eight and a half seconds to open it ...

Continues...


Excerpted from The Double Eagle by James Twining Copyright © 2005 by James Twining.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2006

    Disappointing

    The autopsy of a dead priest brings to light a 1933 Gold Eagle. Only 5 such coins were issued and all five were recalled and supposed to be in Fort Knox. Such is the beginning of this predictable, clumsy and fast-paced novel where a disgraced FBI agent is forced to work with a jewel-thief to figure who, how, when and why. This is a first novel and the first in a series the premise was interesting enough to make me buy it in hardcover but I'll wait for the rest of the series to be available in paperback.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2005

    The future of crime thrillers

    What really makes this book stand out from all the others is its unique achievements of narrating a gripping tale, peppering it with fascinating nuggets of information, and illuminating it with well-turned prose. There are many page-turners on the market, but none with the same richness of detail and refinement of language. The author has evidently researched his subject thoroughly, and takes pleasure in sharing historical and cultural insights that makes you feel you are learning something at the same time as enjoying the read. And while Twining could simply have used the same turns of phrase that typically propel this type of story along, he constantly comes up with novel and arresting images that mark him out as a serious novelist in the making. Twining has raised the bar for all thriller writers, and it remains to be seen if he is the only one to meet the new standard when he releases his next book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific thriller

    On April 5, 1933, President Franklin Roosevelt claiming a national emergency issued Executive Order 6102. With this declaration, FDR directed citizens to hand in their horde of gold whether it is be coin, bullion or certificates to the Federal reserve system by 1 May or face criminal charges. The gold coins including the $20.00 Double Eagle were melted down with five stored as a memento locked way in Fort Knox. Seventy years later, a gold coin surfaced in the throat of a mutilated priest found floating in the Seine in Paris. Someone broke into Fort Knox and stole the coin. FBI Agent Jennifer Browne sees the gold coin caper as a chance to redeem a career that recently took a bad blow due to an error in judgment on her part. She assumes former CIA Agent and retired jewel thief Tom Kirk, who has the requisite skills needed to successfully break into the highly guarded installation and steal the coin. That is until she meets him in England. He wants to clear his name and she her reputation so they team up. --- This is a terrific thriller that uses the true story of the Double Eagle as background enabling the exhilarating action-packed story line to stay anchored in reality. The story line is fast-paced as readers accompany the protagonists and others as the adventure moves back and forth between several American locations, Paris, London, the Netherlands, and Turkey. Readers will appreciate the anti-heroic Tom and commiserate with beleaguered Jennifer who is not sure she should trust her rascally companion, but has no other choice. James Twining provides a fabulous thriller that never allows the audience a chance to catch their breath. --- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)