×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Double Easy: The U.S. Singles
     

Double Easy: The U.S. Singles

by Happy Mondays
 
Oddly enough, a greatest-hits set from the Mondays surfaced in America first rather than the U.K., but whatever the reason for its existence, Double Easy is a nicely random treat. Arranged more or less in chronological order, with the exception of the killer one-two punch of "W.F.L. (Think About the Future)" and the club mix of

Overview

Oddly enough, a greatest-hits set from the Mondays surfaced in America first rather than the U.K., but whatever the reason for its existence, Double Easy is a nicely random treat. Arranged more or less in chronological order, with the exception of the killer one-two punch of "W.F.L. (Think About the Future)" and the club mix of "Hallelujah" at the end of the disc, Double Easy makes a good primer for the baggy era's notorious group. Though leaving out a variety of strong album cuts means that it's by default an incomplete collection (and probably a couple of Yes, Please cuts could have been dropped from the running order), enough good times are in the grooves to summon up instant party vibes. Shaun Ryder and company's genius was that, unlike any number of stereotypical indie Brit groups, they felt the funk -- if the likes of early Kool & the Gang and Funkadelic were the true gods, at the very least the Mondays were good disciples. Combine that with a healthy take on everything from Mark E. Smith's ramalama style to electro beats and Beatles references and more, and what Double Easy demonstrates best in the end is that Beck's own formula had already been established years before. "Wrote for Luck," "Lazyitis," the "MacColl" mix of "Hallelujah," the "Stuff It In" mix of "Step On," "Kinky Afro," and the 12" version of "Loose Fit" help make this a great starting point for new fans, but hardcore followers will appreciate some rarities beyond the remixes. "Tokoloshe Man" -- like "Step On" a John Kongos cover, in this case recorded for the Rubaiyat tribute album -- makes for an intense romp, a bit Madchester by numbers but with a fine slick speed to it. Meanwhile, the underrated groove of "Judge Fudge" makes its first debut on album after its stand-alone appearance in 1991, with what sounds like a Marlena Shaw sample adding a swooping, just paranoid enough atmosphere to the proceedings.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/14/1993
Label:
Elektra / Ada
UPC:
0075596154321
catalogNumber:
61543
Rank:
162193

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Happy Mondays   Primary Artist
Kirsty MacColl   Background Vocals
Paul Ryder   Bass Guitar
Shaun Ryder   Vocals
Gary Whelan   Drums
Bruce Martin   Percussion
Tony Castro   Percussion
Rowetta   Track Performer
Paul Davis   Keyboards

Technical Credits

Paul Oakenfold   Producer
Chris Frantz   Producer
Martin Hannett   Producer
Steve Lillywhite   Remixing
Steve Osborne   Arranger,Producer,Remixing
Mark Roule   Engineer
Paul Ryder   Composer
Shaun Ryder   Composer
Tina Weymouth   Producer
Gary Whelan   Composer
Dave Young   Producer,Engineer
Bez   Composer
Steve Wacksman   Illustrations
Simon Machan   Programming
Paul Davis   Composer,Programming
David Burnham   Engineer
Mark Day   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews