The Double Shadow

The Double Shadow

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by Clark Ashton Smith
     
 

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Clark Ashton Smith--one of the "big three" classic authors from the legendary pulp magazine Weird Tales (the others being H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard)--began writing early in the twentieth century. By the 1920s, he became a regular poet and author in Weird Tales magazine, helping to usher in its golden age. "The Double Shadow" was originally published by the

Overview

Clark Ashton Smith--one of the "big three" classic authors from the legendary pulp magazine Weird Tales (the others being H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard)--began writing early in the twentieth century. By the 1920s, he became a regular poet and author in Weird Tales magazine, helping to usher in its golden age. "The Double Shadow" was originally published by the Auburn Journal in 1933 in an oversized edition limited to only 1,000 copies. Smith carefully signed and hand-corrected many typographical errors for years to come. A collection of six stories ranging from contemporary horror to weird alternate-world fantasy, it remains a fascinating introduction and showcase to his decadently jeweled prose.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940000095119
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
07/01/2003
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
283 KB

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The Double Shadow 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Seekers of high fantasy in the manner of Lord Dunsany will find a treat in Clark Ashton Smith's The Double Shadow. One of the 'big three' writers of pulp fantasy in the 1930's, along with H. P. Lovecraft and Robert Howard, Ashton Smith wrote many well-crafted, stylish, and decadent short stories in several series. The six stories in The Double Shadow are independent of these series, but just as stylish as any of their stories were. 'The Voyage of King Euvoran,' a sardonic account of a king's quest for a missing crown, should please any reader of the Arabian Nights. 'The Maze of the Enchanter' is a chilling tale of transfiguration that surely inspired some of the early tales of Jack Vance's Dying Earth. 'A Nightfall in Malneant' is spiritual journey through despair worthy of Poe himself. 'The Devotee of Evil' follows a pursuit of the source of cosmic malignance to its ultimate wellsprings of madness. 'The Willow Landscape,' on the other hand, is a charmingly written Chinese fairy tale showing Ashton Smith's versatility as a writer. The title story, 'The Double Shadow,' is a masterpiece of dark fantasy, tracing in delicate, poetic, and malific tones the course of a conjuring of the unknown. In his work Ashton Smith plumbs all of a decaying world's dark emotions. Maybe nowhere else will a connoiseur of fantasy find such variety and quality in so small a space as in the collection of six stories published by Wildside Press.