Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

3.5 2
by Ronald Takaki
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0316831565

ISBN-13: 9780316831567

Pub. Date: 07/30/2001

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

From a Navajo code talker to a Tuskegee pilot, Takaki examines the many contributions and sacrifices of America's minorities—blacks, Chinese, Native Americans and others—during World War II. Photos.

Overview

From a Navajo code talker to a Tuskegee pilot, Takaki examines the many contributions and sacrifices of America's minorities—blacks, Chinese, Native Americans and others—during World War II. Photos.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316831567
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
07/30/2001
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
440,894
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.62(d)

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Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Through entertaining personal stories and photographs, this book shows the value and the strength in having a multicultural America during WW II. He points out that Japanese Americans volunteered to go behind enemy lines to gather inteligence, while their families were in American concentration camps. There is a photo of a Japanese American in his US Army uniform being sent to a camp; his chest is covered with medals that he won in WW I. Takaki explains how women of different races learned to work together in the aircraft plants. He shows the the social and economical progress that women and minorities made during WW II, and why they were reasonable to expect to maintain their progress. This is not a book of dry statistics. For example, he tells us about Guy Gabaldon, a marine, raised by a Japanese family in LA, who convinced 800 Japanese soldiers to surrender within seven hours on Saipan. He also tells of the absolute fear that Jews at Dachau had when they were liberated by Japanese Americans, because they thought that the Americans were from Japan and would kill them. This fear that Dachau's inmates had is reflected by the riots in LA, where carloads of White sailors went to East LA, the Mexican area, to beat young Mexican men while the police watched. It took an order from the White House to restore order. Takaki seems to be challenging readers to think about what it means to be American, and the value of diversity.