Dovey Coe [NOOK Book]

Overview

My name is Dovey Coe and I reckon it do’'t matter if you like me or not. I’m here to lay the record straight, to let you know them folks saying I done a terrible thing are liars. I aim to prove it, too. I hated Parnell Caraway as much as the next person, but I didn’t kill him.

Dovey Coe says what’s on her mind, so it’s no secret that she can’t stand Parnell Caraway. Parnell may be the son of the richest man in town, but he’s mean and snobby, ...
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Dovey Coe

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Overview

My name is Dovey Coe and I reckon it do’'t matter if you like me or not. I’m here to lay the record straight, to let you know them folks saying I done a terrible thing are liars. I aim to prove it, too. I hated Parnell Caraway as much as the next person, but I didn’t kill him.

Dovey Coe says what’s on her mind, so it’s no secret that she can’t stand Parnell Caraway. Parnell may be the son of the richest man in town, but he’s mean and snobby, and Dovey can’t stand the fact that he’s courting her sister, Caroline, or the way he treats her brother, Amos, as if he were stupid just because he can’t hear.

So when Parnell turns up dead, and Dovey’s in the room where his body is discovered, she soon finds herself on trial for murder. Can the outspoken Dovey sit still and trust a city slicker lawyer who’s still wet behind the ears to get her out of the biggest mess of her life?

When accused of murder in her North Carolina mountain town in 1928, Dovey Coe, a stronged-willed twelve-year-old girl, comes to a new understanding of others, including her deaf brother.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The 12-year-old title character narrates this first novel, in which she attempts to set the record straight about the death of her sister's suitor. PW called Dowell "an author well worth watching." Ages 9-12. (Nov.) n Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
"My name is Dovey Coe, and I reckon it don't matter if you like me or not." This startling opening line of Dowell's young adult novel Dovey Coe commands instant attention. Dowell's first published novel plunges readers into the sensitivities of a feisty, insightful twelve-year-old who takes no nonsense, talks straight, and whose voice creates a tension that pulls the plotline taut. What comes next after Dovey Coe's remarkable opening line is a stunning first paragraph; it ends with the clincher: "I hated Parnell Caraway as much as the next person, but I didn't kill him." Parnell Caraway, readers soon learn, is the haughty son of a local merchant and Dovey's archenemy. Dovey begins the book by seeing life in stark contrasts, and it is this perspective that eventually leads to her growth. Dovey believes her brother Amos needs her, but, in the end, she discovers she is the one who needs him. Her combative dialogue and actions make her the target of assumptions that threaten to condemn her at the trial; it's only at the trial when she is being judged that she understands how she herself has condemned Parnell. As Parnell's sister cries, she realizes what Amos' death would mean to her. "I let that feeling sink deep inside me," she says, "and when Mama took my hand to lead me outside, the tears were falling down my own cheeks." Even Dovey's voice mirrors these contrasts; she speaks with a boldness softened by the lyricism of mountain dialect. Dovey describes the opposing lawyer as "a comical looking sort, as he had no chin to speak of and his eyes was kind of buggy, like a frog's." After this frank assessment of his looks, she continues with another metaphor: "He could string words together andmake them shine like lights around a Christmas tree." 2000, Atheneum, Ages 9 to 12, $16.00. Reviewer: Susie Wilde
VOYA
Dovey Coe is a twelveyear-old girl accused of a murder she did not commit. Dovey is fiercely protective of her attractive older sister and deaf younger brother. Her sharp insights and feelings about the residents of her rural town expose the rift between the rich and poor. When tensions rise between the Coe family and the wealthy Caraways, the stage is set for the murder of Parnell Caraway. Some of the novel's most revealing scenes unfold in the courtroom in which a city lawyer defends Dovey at her trial. Although the premise suggests a mystery story, insights into the town's history, anecdotes of its notable characters, and the unspoken animosity of residents to young Dovey lend depth to the 1928 setting and to the novel's rich blend of rural characters. The feisty voice of the female narrator carries this story. The book bears positive messages about family pride, selfreliance, and inner beauty. Dovey's strength of character alone is worth the read for younger middle school girls. This wellwritten novel is a worthy addition to any middle school collection. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8). 2000, Atheneum/S & S, Ages 12 to 14, 192p, $16. Reviewer: Nick Spencer
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-It is 1928 and 12-year-old Dovey Coe is happy with her life in Indian Creek, NC. Her family has been in the mountains "since the beginning of time." They own their land and are one of the few families who are not beholden to wealthy Homer Caraway. Dovey guards her siblings closely. She taught her deaf older brother how to read books and lips, and worries about her older sister, Caroline, who seems to have forgotten her plans to go to teacher's college after uppity Parnell Caraway (Dovey's least favorite person) starts calling on her. How protective a little sister she actually is, remains to be seen-she tells readers in the first paragraph that she is being tried for Parnell's murder, then proceeds to recount what happened. The story maintains a very fast pace, and Dovey is an original character who speaks with a mountain twang that brings the vivid setting to life without distracting from the plot. The background and characters are carefully developed and appealing. Dovey's adventures will appeal to fans of Avi's The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle (Orchard, 1990), while the mystery follows conventions of the genre and is explained in an entirely satisfactory manner.-Betsy Fraser, Calgary Public Library, Canada Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
Proud mountainfolk, the Coe family has resided in Indian Creek, North Carolina, since 1844. Joe Coe fixes electrical appliances; 12-year-old Dovey and 13-year-old Amos collect healing herbs to sell. Dovey's older sister, Caroline, is a rare beauty who has dreams of escaping small-town life. Their tranquil home life is threatened when Parnell Caraway, son of the richest man in town, sets his sights on Caroline. He is so determined to marry her and destroy her dreams of becoming a teacher that he forces her hand at a send-off party in her honor and faces public humiliation as a result. Unable to handle rejection, Parnell locks up the Coe's dog in revenge, forcing Dovey to retrieve it and to witness its brutal murder. She tries to stop it and is attacked by Parnell. When she awakens from the beating, Parnell is dead at her side and she is falsely accused of murder. Assigned an inexperienced district attorney, Dovey has to solve the murder herself or face imprisonment. In the end, she is spared the injustice of being sent to a girls' detention center; Caroline owns up to the fact that her flirtations with Parnell have caused this disastrous result; and Amos reveals to his sister that he, in fact, killed Parnell to spare her additional abuse at his hands. Dovey's fresh, clear voice in southern dialect cuts through the social behavior of the locale and time period to speak the truth, which all of the other older and wiser characters refuse to see. This fabulously feisty heroine will win your heart. (Fiction. 10-12)
Booklist
"A delightful book, thoughtful and full of substance."
From the Publisher
* "Dovey is an original character who speaks with a mountain twang that brings the vivid setting to life."

"This fabulously feisty heroine will win your heart."

"A delightful book, thoughtful and full of substance."

"Bears positive messages about family pride, self-reliance, and inner beauty. Dovey's strength of character alone is well worth the reader for young middle school girls. A worthy addition to any middle school collection."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442490307
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 3/26/2013
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 144,359
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

 Frances O’Roark Dowell is the bestselling and critically acclaimed author of Dovey Coe, which won the Edgar Award and the William Allen White Award; Where I’d Like to Be; the bestselling The Secret Language of Girls and its sequels The Kind of Friends We Used to Be and The Sound of Your Voice, Only Really Far Away; Chicken Boy; Shooting the Moon, which was awarded the Christopher Medal; the Phineas L. MacGuire series; Falling In; the critically acclaimed The Second Life of Abigail Walker; Anybody Shining; and the teen novel Ten Miles Past Normal. She lives with her husband and two sons in Durham, North Carolina. Connect with Frances online at FrancesDowell.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

My name is Dovey Coe, and I reckon it don't matter if you like me or not. I'm here to lay the record straight, to let you know them folks saying I done a terrible thing are liars. I aim to prove it, too. I hated Parnell Caraway as much as the next person, but I didn't kill him.

I know plenty of folks who thought about it once or twice, after Parnell shot a BB gun at their cats or broke their daughters' hearts. They're the same ones who go around now making out like Parnell was an angel, a regular pillar of society. The truth is, there ain't no one in Indian Creek who didn't believe Parnell Caraway was the meanest, vainest, greediest man who ever lived. Seventeen years old and rotten to the core.

Of course, his daddy being the richest man in town meant Parnell could do about whatever he pleased without anybody saying boo back to him. Most of the folks who live in town rent their houses from Homer Caraway and buy their dry goods from his store, and they know better than to cross him. You so much as look at Homer Caraway wrong and he can make your life right miserable.

Every time I start complaining about having to walk a half mile down the mountain to school every morning, I remember how lucky we are to own our land. It ain't much -- four acres, a five-room house, and a barn -- but it keeps us Coes from being beholden to Homer Caraway, and I'd walk ten miles to school to keep it that way.

I know it pained Parnell that we weren't indebted to his daddy. Maybe if we had been, my sister Caroline would have married him the way he kept asking her to do. Caroline Coe was the one thing Parnell wanted he couldn't have. As conceited as Parnell was, it took him a long time to figure that out.

But I'm getting ahead of myself, which I do from time to time. You probably want to know where I'm from and who my family is, the particulars folks tend to be interested in.

Like I said, my name is Dovey Coe. There have been Coes living in Indian Creek, North Carolina, since the beginning of time, and I expect there always will be. We're mountain folk, and once you been living in the mountains for a while, it's hard to live anywhere else. You can walk over to the graveyard behind the church in town and see Coes going as far back as 1844. The most recent stone belongs to my Granddaddy Caleb, who passed on two years ago, when I was ten. It says: HERE LIES CALEB COE, LOVING HUSBAND TO REBECCA COE, FATHER TO MATTHEW, LUKE, AND JOHN COE. BORN MAY 17, 1861. DIED DECEMBER 2, 1926. MAY HE WALK WITH THE LORD.

John Coe is my daddy. He's what they call a jack-of-all-trades, meaning he can fix anything you got that's broke and some things that ain't. Folks bring him their busted radios, their hay-wire toasters, their broke-down automobiles, and Daddy tightens a screw here, reconnects a wire there, and makes it good as new. Them who have money to pay give him a dollar or two, depending on the size of the job, and them who don't have a dime in their pocket work out a barter. When Gaither Sparks's carburetor died, we got a new pig and a pound of sugar. It evens out, as Daddy is all the time saying.

Mama grew up over in Cane Creek Holler, not two miles from here. She still hums the songs she learned when she was a little girl while she works around the house, and she has taught many of them songs to me. I try my best to remember them the right way, and I always pretend like I'm paying attention when she's telling me all the things she says a young lady ought to know.

Besides Caroline, I got me an older brother named Amos, age of thirteen, and he loves good adventure as much as I do. We spend a good portion of our days running around on Katie's Knob, hunting arrowheads or hunks of crystal quartz, tracking all manner of wild animals and generally having a big time.

We live in the house my daddy grew up in, and every morning I look out upon the same mountains my daddy looked out upon when he was a child. I like sitting on the porch watching the summer evenings fall across the valley, listening to Daddy pick old tunes on his guitar. I enjoy the cozy feel of sitting next to the woodstove when there's a frosty bite in the air.

There's at least a million other things that all add up to my good life here, more things than I can say or even remember, they're so natural to me now.

That's why it's hard to believe they might send me away from here.

It's not that I blamed Caroline for this whole mess. I know deep inside it ain't exactly her fault. But on top of things, it sure feels that way.

Copyright © 2000 by Frances O'Roark Dowell
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Introduction

A GUIDE FOR READING GROUPS

DOVEY COE

By Frances O'Roark Dowell

ABOUT THE BOOK

When accused of murder in her North Carolina mountain town in 1928, Dovey Coe, a strong-willed twelve-year-old girl, comes to a new understanding of others, including her deaf brother, Amos. Parnell Caraway, an annoying teen with his own car, is set on taking Dovey's sister, Caroline, as his wife, attempting to divert her from her dream of going to college to become a teacher. After his proposal is turned down, Parnell is found dead, and Dovey is the only witness. It is up to the judge to decide if the feisty tomboy is innocent or guilty of murder.

THEMES

Family; North Carolina/ Southern culture; Disability Hearing; Gender stereotypes; Court system; Rich versus poor

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

• Dovey seems to think her father should have spoken out against Parnell (see pg. 38) and not let things go so far. Why do you think he wants Caroline to make her own decisions about seeing Parnell? Do you think his actions are wise?

• Dovey states, "The way I seen things, us Coes had everything we needed in this world...To my way of thinking, Parnell was a prime example of riches not necessarily making a man satisfied with his life" (pg. 64-5). Do you think this is true of Parnell? How does being rich or poor affect other characters, such as Paris, Caroline, and Amos?

• Parnell laughs when he tells Caroline, "Were you really serious about being a teacher? I mean, I ain't ever seen you pick up a book of your own volition. I ain't even sure you can read." Why does he say this? How does it make Caroline feel? How does it make you feel?

ACTIVITIES

• Amos uses signals to talk with Dovey and with his dogs. Make up some symbols as a group to talk to one another without speaking. Have some sign language books or videos available to students then compare your symbols with the American Sign Language symbols for these things. Schedule a class visitor who can teach students some sign language or learn how to communicate with deaf people in your community.

• Dovey learns about the court system through the process of her trial. Learn the meanings of court terminology ("objection sustained," etc.), what judges and juries do, and other aspects of the American court system. Visit a local courtroom for a tour or listen in on a hearing. Watch To Kill a Mockingbird for another look at a courtroom experience.

• Make a map of North Carolina with the cities mentioned in Dovey Coe, other important cities, mountain ranges, forests, lakes, etc. Write to the governor of North Carolina for information about the state. Find information about the wildlife Amos and Dovey might have encountered on Katie's Knob.

This reading group guide is for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.

Prepared by Jennifer Bergen, Manhattan Public Library

© William Allen White Children's Book Award

Please visit http://www.emporia.edu/libsv/wawbookaward/ for more information about the awards and to see curriculum guides for other master list titles.

Frances O'Roark Dowell is the bestselling and critically acclaimed author of Dovey Coe, which won the Edgar Award, Where I'd Like to Be, the bestselling The Secret Language of Girls, and its sequel The Kind of Friends We Used to Be, Chicken Boy, Shooting the Moon, which was awarded the Christopher Medal, and most recently Falling In.  She lives with her husband and two sons in Durham, North Carolina. Connect with Frances online at FrancesDowell.com.

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Reading Group Guide

A GUIDE FOR READING GROUPS

DOVEY COE

By Frances O'Roark Dowell

ABOUT THE BOOK

When accused of murder in her North Carolina mountain town in 1928, Dovey Coe, a strong-willed twelve-year-old girl, comes to a new understanding of others, including her deaf brother, Amos. Parnell Caraway, an annoying teen with his own car, is set on taking Dovey's sister, Caroline, as his wife, attempting to divert her from her dream of going to college to become a teacher. After his proposal is turned down, Parnell is found dead, and Dovey is the only witness. It is up to the judge to decide if the feisty tomboy is innocent or guilty of murder.

THEMES

Family; North Carolina/ Southern culture; Disability Hearing; Gender stereotypes; Court system; Rich versus poor

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

• Dovey seems to think her father should have spoken out against Parnell (see pg. 38) and not let things go so far. Why do you think he wants Caroline to make her own decisions about seeing Parnell? Do you think his actions are wise?

• Dovey states, "The way I seen things, us Coes had everything we needed in this world...To my way of thinking, Parnell was a prime example of riches not necessarily making a man satisfied with his life" (pg. 64-5). Do you think this is true of Parnell? How does being rich or poor affect other characters, such as Paris, Caroline, and Amos?

• Parnell laughs when he tells Caroline, "Were you really serious about being a teacher? I mean, I ain't ever seen you pick up a book of your own volition. I ain't even sure you can read." Why does he say this? How does it make Caroline feel? How does it make you feel?

ACTIVITIES

• Amos uses signals to talk with Dovey and with his dogs. Make up some symbols as a group to talk to one another without speaking. Have some sign language books or videos available to students then compare your symbols with the American Sign Language symbols for these things. Schedule a class visitor who can teach students some sign language or learn how to communicate with deaf people in your community.

• Dovey learns about the court system through the process of her trial. Learn the meanings of court terminology ("objection sustained," etc.), what judges and juries do, and other aspects of the American court system. Visit a local courtroom for a tour or listen in on a hearing. Watch To Kill a Mockingbird for another look at a courtroom experience.

• Make a map of North Carolina with the cities mentioned in Dovey Coe, other important cities, mountain ranges, forests, lakes, etc. Write to the governor of North Carolina for information about the state. Find information about the wildlife Amos and Dovey might have encountered on Katie's Knob.

This reading group guide is for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.

Prepared by Jennifer Bergen, Manhattan Public Library

© William Allen White Children's Book Award

Please visit http://www.emporia.edu/libsv/wawbookaward/ for more information about the awards and to see curriculum guides for other master list titles.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

(7)

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(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2006

    Dovey Coe Review

    Dovey coe was one of the best books i have ever read.When you read the book it just takes you to the place.It takes you straight into her mind.i highly recommend you read this book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Amazing

    Mrs.larson is my reading teacher and she just started reding it. Its just revoltingly sickining how Caroline uses her beauty to get what she wants. But so far so good.(wonder if its a related title to 'how to kill a mockingbird?)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2012

    My book is Dovey Coe by Frances O¿Roark Dowell about a girl name

    My book is Dovey Coe by Frances O’Roark Dowell about a girl named Dovey Coe and her sister Caroline. Caroline is supposed to get married to this guy that she meets named Parnell. One night something bad happened to him. Caroline was supposed to go see him one day and when she went to go see him she saw him lying there on the ground dead. Someone has killed him by cutting his throat with a knife. People thought it was Dovey that killed him from being jealous so she went to court to see if she was guilty or not.
    This book is told by a girl named Dovey Coe. Dovey and the Coe family have been living in Indian Creek North Carolina since the beginning of time. In this book Dovey’s sister Caroline meets this guy and his name is Parnell. Caroline and Parnell become really good friends and like to hang out with each other a lot. After a while in the book Caroline and Parnell get so close to each other that Parnell purposed to Caroline. Everyone was so happy for them.
    One day Caroline went to go see Parnell one day, when she got there she saw Parnell lying on the floor dead. Caroline was so upset and wondered why anyone would do such a thing to him. His death was caused by someone cut his throat with a knife. Some people thought that Dovey did it because she was jealous of Caroline getting married. They took Dovey to court for what they thought that she had done. When they took Dovey to court they realized that a sweet girl like her couldn’t do such a thing. They figured that someone else had killed Parnell then. That’s the main things that happened in this book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2011

    1 of the best books I ever read!

    This is book is AMAZING! It is narrated by Dovey herself and I wouldnt want any other way! I am not good at explaining things so just take my advice and read it. You will NEVER regret it, or think you wasted your time for a minute.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2008

    Will enjoy

    I was worried about the content for my 11 year old, but I have to say that once he started to read it he didn't want to stop. And he doesn't like reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2004

    Dovey of the Brave

    This book is the absolute best book i've ever read. I loved it so much I had to keep reading and reading it. It's definately a book you never want to put down. The first time I read I thought I was going to cry. But I finally grew to know the true meaning

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2004

    WooHoo

    I thought this book was awesome and rocked!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2003

    This Book is awsome!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    When I read this book for a book report, I thought it was the best book I had ever picked up. It was so interesting, that I finished it in 2 days.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2003

    read this book

    this book is a really good book it helps find out that no matter what family always comes throug for you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2003

    AN AWESOME BOOK!

    This was a great book that everyone should read!I loved it. Peace Out!!!:)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2014

    Lily

    Glared at them all her green eyes flashing

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    JOIN CAMP SWIFTA

    AT "swifta" RESULT TWO NAT IS STARTING UP THE CAMP AGAIN AND IT IS FOR PEOPLE WITH ALL KINDS OF TALENTS INCLUDING FIGHTING THERE IS A TRAINING ARENA THERE !!! PLEASE JOIN WE NEED MORE PEOPLE TO ENROLL<p>POSTPOSTPOSTPOST

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2014

    Rowan

    When do the games begin

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2014

    LJ

    (Female from d7) is there actually any games or is this a chatroom? Post postpostpostpost

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    Vivian

    9. Can't take it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    Raynell

    The girl r from district 5 walked in

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2014

    Ellie

    Looks into the distance.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    MADELINE

    THE FATTEST NIGHT AT THE ROUND TABLE WAS NEMED SIR CUMFENCE HE LOVED TO GORGE ON PI

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    Lukas

    Thx

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    Hate it

    Im in 10th grade and we have to read this book its horrible i hate it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews

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