Dr. Bloodmoney

( 5 )

Overview

"A masterpiece."—Roberto Bolaño

What happens after the bombs drop? This is the troubling question Philip K. Dick addresses with Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb. It is the story of a world reeling from the effects of nuclear annihilation and fallout, a world where mutated humans and animals are the norm, and the scattered survivors take comfort from a disc jockey endlessly circling the globe in a broken-down satellite. And hidden amongst the survivors is Dr. Bloodmoney himself, the man ...

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Dr. Bloodmoney

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Overview

"A masterpiece."—Roberto Bolaño

What happens after the bombs drop? This is the troubling question Philip K. Dick addresses with Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb. It is the story of a world reeling from the effects of nuclear annihilation and fallout, a world where mutated humans and animals are the norm, and the scattered survivors take comfort from a disc jockey endlessly circling the globe in a broken-down satellite. And hidden amongst the survivors is Dr. Bloodmoney himself, the man responsible for it all. This bizarre cast of characters cajole, seduce, and backstab in their attempts to get ahead in what is left of the world, consequences and casualties be damned. A sort of companion to Dr. Strangelove, an unofficial and unhinged sequel, Dick’s novel is just as full of dark comedy and just as chilling.

The story of paranoia and the political domination after a world thermonuclear war.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, these titles follow Dick's familiar theme that things and people are not quite what and who they seem, basically challenging reality. Though dead for 20 years now, Dick still is hugely popular among sf readers and Blade Runner nuts, so pop for these. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547572529
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/23/2012
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 546,973
  • Product dimensions: 5.36 (w) x 7.88 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film; notably: Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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Read an Excerpt

Dr. Bloodmoney is a post-nuclear-holocaust masterpiece filled with a host of Dick’s most memorable characters: Hoppy Harrington, a deformed mutant with telekinetic powers; Walt Dangerfield, a selfless disc jockey stranded in a satellite circling the globe; Dr. Bluthgeld, the megalomaniac physicist largely responsible for the decimated state of the world; and Stuart McConchie and Bonnie Keller, two unremarkable people bent the survival of goodness in a world devastated by evil. Epic and alluring, this brilliant novel is a mesmerizing depiction of Dick’s undying hope in humanity.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2000

    Or how I got by AFTER they dropped the bomb.

    When the Kubrik movie, 'Doctor StrangeLove -- or how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb' came out, many critic's thought that this was one of the most disgusting ideas for a movie. Philip K. Dick (as well as many more of us), felt that the entire idea of the Bomb itself was far more disgusting. Life after the bomb is gray, dismal and far from the utopia that many sci fi writers of the '40's, '50's (and even into the '70's) fore-saw. And yet, as with all of Phil's works, the basic dignity and goodness of people shines through -- and in the end 'you can get used to anything'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2009

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    Posted October 12, 2009

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    Posted July 23, 2009

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