Dr. Seuss Goes to War: World War II Editorial Cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel

Dr. Seuss Goes to War: World War II Editorial Cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel

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by Richard H. Minear, Dr. Seuss, Theodor Seuss Geisel
     
 

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For decades, readers throughout the world have enjoyed the marvelous stories and illustrations of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. But few know the work Geisel did as a political cartoonist during World War II, for the New York daily newspaper PM. In these extraordinarily trenchant cartoons, Geisel presents "a provocative history of wartimeSee more details below

Overview


For decades, readers throughout the world have enjoyed the marvelous stories and illustrations of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. But few know the work Geisel did as a political cartoonist during World War II, for the New York daily newspaper PM. In these extraordinarily trenchant cartoons, Geisel presents "a provocative history of wartime politics" (Entertainment Weekly). Dr. Seuss Goes to War features handsome, large-format reproductions of more than two hundred of Geisel’s cartoons, alongside "insightful" (Booklist) commentary by the historian Richard H. Minear that places them in the context of the national climate they reflect.

Pulitzer Prize–winner Art Spiegelman’s introduction places Seuss firmly in the pantheon of the leading political cartoonists of our time.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Scathing, fascinating stuff. . . . A provocative history of wartime politics. Grade: A."
Entertainment Weekly

"Vigorous, trenchant, and vividly memorable, Geisel’s cartoons, accompanied by Minear’s helpful commentary, are a salutary reminder of an era in which patriotism and liberalism went hand in hand."
The Christian Science Monitor

"Great cartooning. . . . Minear’s text gives solid context to the drawings resurrected in this collection."
Atlantic Monthly

"Succeeds as both a dark-humored history lesson and a glimpse into the artistic development that would carry into Seuss’s best known books."
Mother Jones

Joshua Klein
Great works by great authors generally don't go unpublished. If literature can be likened to archeology, few high-profile excavations evince lost masterpieces; if anything turns up in the files of dead writers, it's often relegated to the realm of unfinished works in progress. What's fascinating about Dr. Seuss Goes To War, an illuminating book of never-before-collected political cartoons, isn't just the quantity but the quality.

Before Seuss became an ingenious children's author, he spent the early years of WWII working for New York's short-lived liberal publication PM. In 1941 and '42, he contributed about 400 sharp capsule cartoons that decried isolationism, anti-Semitism, and, of course, Hitler--fellow cartoonist Art Spiegelman, who wrote the introduction, dubs this series "Horton hears a heil"--all of which prove a bit disconcerting coming from a childhood idol of millions. Cartoons dealing with "the home front" are especially biting, decrying the isolationist policies of the U.S. in a provocative and agitated manner at odds with the relatively conservative tenor of the times. Targets like Hitler and Tojo are pretty obvious (and hilarious), though much of Seuss' ammunition is spent castigating Charles Lindbergh for his questionable politics.

Seuss stopped making these cartoons once America entered the international fray, opting instead to enlist; he worked under director Frank Capra making propaganda films. Historian Richard H. Minear provides several illustrative essays to contextualize Seuss' opinions, but it's the work of the would-be Doctor that makes this coffee-table book the progressive gift of choice this year.
Onion A.V. Club

Studs Terkel
A shocker—this cat is not in the hat!
People
A revelation.
Mother Jones
[B]oth a dark-humored history lesson and a glimpse into the artistic development that would carry into Seuss's best known books.
Atlantic Monthly
Great cartooning....Minear's text gives solid context to the drawings resurrected in this collection.
Entertainment Weekly
Scathing, fascinating stuff....A provocative history of wartime politics. Grade: A.
Christian Science Monitor
Vigorous, trenchant, and vividly memorable...a salutary reminder of an era in which patriotism and liberalism went hand in hand.
New York Times Book Review
A fascinating collection.
Margot Mifflin
This is a scathing, fascinating stuff, and with Minear's commentary, it provides a provocative history of wartime politics.
Entertainment Weekly
Harry Bauld
The 1941-43 editorial cartoons of Dr. Seuss (real name, Theodore Seuss Geisel), newly published with essays by historian Minear and an introduction by Maus author Art Spiegelman, are a revelation.

People Magazine

Michelle Gerise Godwin
I'm grateful that Richard Minear assembled this survey chronicling Dr. Seuss's first editorial stint nearly sixty years after his original cartoon was published.. Dr. Seuss not only helped me learn to read, he helped inspire my politics.
The Progressive Michelle Gerise Godwin

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565847040
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
255,113
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are saying about this

Brian M. Raftery
This is scathing, fascinating stuff, and with Minear's commentary, it provides a provocative history of wartime politics.
—Brian M. RafteryEntertainment Weekly, , 5 November 1999

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