Dracula's Daughter - An Alternate History for Classic Film Monsters

( 3 )

Overview

"Just when you thought you knew everything about our beloved classic monsters - Philip Riley pulls another bat out of the hat with this new remarkable book series."
- Stan Winston

"Philip J Riley continues to discover lost film lore - last was the amazing reconstruction of Lon Chaney's The Phantom of the Opera and now a treasure trove of scripts that no one knew existed."
- Ray Bradbury

WHAT IF... Boris Karloff portrayed the Wolfman and The Invisible Man and Cagliostro, King of the Dead? What if Lon Chaney ...

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More About This Book

Overview

"Just when you thought you knew everything about our beloved classic monsters - Philip Riley pulls another bat out of the hat with this new remarkable book series."
- Stan Winston

"Philip J Riley continues to discover lost film lore - last was the amazing reconstruction of Lon Chaney's The Phantom of the Opera and now a treasure trove of scripts that no one knew existed."
- Ray Bradbury

WHAT IF... Boris Karloff portrayed the Wolfman and The Invisible Man and Cagliostro, King of the Dead? What if Lon Chaney portrayed Count Dracula, or Lon Chaney Jr. appeared in what was to be the first Technicolor Classic Monster film.

What if Bela Lugosi starred in Frankenstein as the Doctor or the Monster or Wolfman vs. Dracula or in the script included in this first volume of the Alternate History of FilMonsters James Whale's DRACULA'S DAUGHTER?

Now through the discovery of these legendary filmscripts you will have your answers!

Contains the excised chapter from Dracula, entitled Dracula's Guest by Bram Stoker

Plus the memories of Carl Laemmle Junior and R.C. Sherriff

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593934750
  • Publisher: BearManor Media
  • Publication date: 10/31/2009
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,305,779
  • Product dimensions: 8.25 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 28, 2012

    No Over-bite here!

    Philip Riley gives a revealing look at the Dracula series. A well researched and fascinating book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2009

    The original story, before the movie

    "Dracula's Daughter" (1936), directed by Lambert Hillyer, was the long-awaited sequel to the classic movie "Dracula" (1931) starring Bela Lugosi. (However, Bela did not appear in the sequel, since by that time he was also working for other studios besides Universal -- Bela did "Mark of the Vampire" [1935] for MGM -- he was completely written out of the script.) The film begins shortly after the point where the original ended -- with Prof. Van Helsing being charged for the murder of Count Dracula (whom the police assume was an ordinary human). Although James Whale did not direct the movie, he'd added into the script scenes with gay and lesbian overtones. Because of the scenes with Nan Grey posing without a blouse and being exsanguinated by Daughter, and Daughter coming on to Marguerite Churchill, "Dracula's Daughter" is considered an early lesbian film.

    However, the original script was quite different from the filmed version. Originally, James Whale -- who directed "Frankenstein" (1931) and the sequel "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) -- was slated to direct "Dracula's Daughter." Now, for the first time ever, thanks to BearManor books, you can read the original, unused script for this movie -- and see how very different it is from the final movie version.

    Whereas the low budget of the Universal movie "Dracula" (1931) could not delve into the Transylvanian setting as much as the novel by Bram Stoker, James Whale's "Dracula's Daughter" -- scheduled for a higher budget -- has the entire first third of the movie set in Transylvania (with Bela Lugosi slated to reprise his Count Dracula role). It is a Transylvania rife with the undead, monsters, whips & chains, references to "dope fiends," sensuality, and eroticism between vampires and human slaves. (In short, this script would never have passed the censors' review boards of the 1930s!) Writer John L. Balderston specifically wrote in his Treatment of the story: "Why should Cecil B. DeMille have a monopoly of the great box office value of torture and cruelty in pictures of ancient Rome?" (obviously referring to movies about Christian martyrs, like "The Sign of the Cross" [1932]).

    Then we have the discarded 140-page first draft script by R. C. (Robert Cedric) Sherriff. We find out the origin of Count Dracula -- he was cursed by Talifer, a wizard who lived at the time of King Arthur, and is still around in contemporary times. Prof. Van Helsing and company dispatched Dracula in the first movie, but now Van Helsing has to deal with Dracula's Daughter. R. C. Sherriff (contributing writer, uncredited for the movie) seamlessly picks up the original story, and provides fascinating background on the vampire lore. This unused script is a must-read.

    In order to fully appreciate "Dracula's Daughter," you will want this informative BearManor book as a companion-piece to a DVD of the movie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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