Draculas, Vampires, and Other Undead Forms: Essays on Gender, Race and Culture [NOOK Book]

Overview

Since the publication of Dracula in 1897, Bram Stoker's original creation has been a source of inspiration for artists, writers, and filmmakers. From Universal's early black-and-white films and Hammer's Technicolor representations that followed, iterations of Dracula have been cemented in mainstream cinema. This anthology investigates and explores the far larger body of work coming from sources beyond mainstream cinema reinventing Dracula. Draculas, Vampires and Other Undead Forms assembles provocative essays ...
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Draculas, Vampires, and Other Undead Forms: Essays on Gender, Race and Culture

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Overview

Since the publication of Dracula in 1897, Bram Stoker's original creation has been a source of inspiration for artists, writers, and filmmakers. From Universal's early black-and-white films and Hammer's Technicolor representations that followed, iterations of Dracula have been cemented in mainstream cinema. This anthology investigates and explores the far larger body of work coming from sources beyond mainstream cinema reinventing Dracula. Draculas, Vampires and Other Undead Forms assembles provocative essays that examine Dracula films and their movement across borders of nationality, sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and genre since the 1920s. The essays analyze the complexity Dracula embodies outside the conventional landscape of films with which the vampire is typically associated. Focusing on Dracula and Dracula-type characters in film, anime, and literature from predominantly non-Anglo markets, this anthology offers unique perspectives that seek to ground depictions and experiences of Dracula within a larger political, historical, and cultural framework.
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Editorial Reviews

Horror Movie Reviews
The variety and richness of the essays collected here certainly offer many intriguing pages for both fans and scholars of the undead creatures.

With such a large scope, minute research, fresh perspectives and well-argued writing, Draculas, Vampires, and Other Undead Forms guarantees more than 300 pages of an interesting and inspiring read which finds a perfect balance between the academic and popular writing. It is accessible, but not light; interesting, but not shallow; clever, but not self-indulgent; serious, but never boring. And most importantly, it may make you think differently about the various vampire texts that you thought you knew well, and will certainly reveal many new ones.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810869233
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/8/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 338
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

John Browning teaches at Louisiana State University. Caroline Joan (Kay) Picart has been a professor of Philosophy, Biology, English, and Film for over 20 years. Since August 2008, she has produced and hosted her own radio show, which boasts over a million monthly listeners.
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Table of Contents

Foreword David J. Skal v

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: Documenting Dracula and Global Identities in Film, Literature, and Anime John Edgar Browning Caroline Joan (Kay) Picart ix

Part I Tackling Race, Gender, and Modes of Narration in America

1 Manly P. Hall, Dracula (1931), and the Complexities of the Classic Horror Film Sequel Gary D. Rhodes 3

2 The Dracula and the Blacula (1972) Cultural Revolution Paul R. Lehman John Edgar Browning 19

3 The Compulsions of Real/Reel Serial Killers and Vampires: Toward a Gothic Criminology Caroline Joan (Kay) Picart Cecil Greek 37

4 Blood, Lust, and the Fe/Male Narrative in Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992) and the Novel (1897) Lisa Nystrom 63

5 The Borg as Vampire in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994) and Start Trek: First Contact (1996): An Uncanny Reflection Justin Everett 77

6 When Women Kill: Undead Imagery in the Cinematic Portrait of Aileen Wuornos Caroline Joan (Kay) Picart Cecil Greek 93

Part II Working through Change and Xenophobia in Europe

7 Return Ticket to Transylvania: Relations between Historical Reality and Vampire Fiction Santiago Lucendo 115

8 Racism and the Vampire: The Anti-Slavic Premise of Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) Jimmie Cain 127

9 The Greateful Un-Dead: Count Dracula and the Transnational Counterculture in Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) Paul Newland 135

10 Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) as a Legacy of Romanticism Martina G. L&uumlet;ke 153

Part III Imperialism, Hybridity, and Cross-Cultural Fertilization in Asia

11 "Death and the Maiden": The Pontianak as Excess in Malay Popular Culture Andrew Hock-Soon Ng 167

12 Becoming-Death: The Lollywood Gothicof Khwaja Sarfraz's Zinda Laash (Dracula in Pakistan [US title], 1967) Sean Moreland Summer Pervez 187

13 Modernity as Crisis: Goeng Si and Vampires in Hong Kong Cinema Dale Hudson 203

14 Enter the Dracula: The Silent Screams and Cultural Crossroads of Japanese and Hong Kong Cinema Wayne Stein 235

15 Identity Crisis: Imperialist Vampires in Japan? Nicholas Schlegel 261

16 The Western Eastern: Decoding Hybridity and CyberZen Goth(ic) in Vampire Hunter D (1985) Wayne Stein John Edgar Browning 279

Index 295

About the Editors and Contributors 311

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