The Draft Lottery

The Draft Lottery

by Natalie M. Rosinsky
     
 

The draft lottery put into place during the Vietnam War was a source of bitter disagreement. Like the war itself, the draft affected Americans during the conflict and long after the war was over. The draft has been around since 1940, but it was during the Vietnam War that it became a major target of antiwar protesters. The draft lottery, set up in 1969, was supposed…  See more details below

Overview

The draft lottery put into place during the Vietnam War was a source of bitter disagreement. Like the war itself, the draft affected Americans during the conflict and long after the war was over. The draft has been around since 1940, but it was during the Vietnam War that it became a major target of antiwar protesters. The draft lottery, set up in 1969, was supposed to make the draft more fair. But it continued to stir strong emotions and did not end opposition to the war.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Heather N. Kolich
Opening on a detailed scene of a young man publicly burning his draft card, this selection from the "We the People" series spotlights several Vietnam War draft resisters, anti-war protesters, and anti-war demonstrations. In that only draft resisters and anti-war protesters are profiled, the book lacks objectivity. One paragraph explains the conflict between the North Vietnamese and South Vietnamese, but information about why and how U.S. troops came to be involved in the war is absent. After credibly detailing aspects of the original draft system that contributed to unfair selection, the author devotes five paragraphs to the less biased draft lottery. While the number of men who refused to register with the Selective Service, resisted reporting for induction into the Army, and fled to Canada and Switzerland to avoid the draft are reported, the author fails to include when the draft for the Vietnam war began, and how many men actually served as a result of being drafted. The integrity of the research comes further into question with the incorrect statement on page 41 that the U.S. Congress attempted to reinstate the draft in 2003, 2006, and 2007. While one Congressman, Rep. Charles Rangel (D, NY), introduced the Universal National Service Act into the House Armed Services Committee in each of these years and in 2005, only the first bill, H.B. 163, came to the House floor for a vote. It was defeated 402 to 2. The other three bills languished in the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, never coming to the House floor for consideration. A similar Senate bill introduced by Ernest F. Hollings (D, SC) on January 7, 2003, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services from which it neveremerged. The bill died when the 108th Congress ended. Reviewer: Heather N. Kolich

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756538415
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Series:
Bajo las olas / Under the Sea Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
980L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

PWB Biography:
Natalie M. Rosinsky is the award-winning author of more than 90 publications. She writes about history, social studies, economics, popular culture, and science. Natalie earned graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has been a high school teacher and college professor as well as a corporate trainer. She lives and writes in Mankato, Minnesota.
CPB Biography:

Natalie M. Rosinsky is the award-winning author of more than 90 publications, including 10 books about Native American tribes. She writes about science, history, economics, social studies, and popular culture. One of her two cats usually sits near her computer as she works in Mankato, Minnesota. Natalie earned graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin and has been a high school teacher and college professor as well as a corporate trainer.

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