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Dragon Path: The Collected Tales of Kenneth Morris
     

Dragon Path: The Collected Tales of Kenneth Morris

by Kenneth Morris
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
Though he wrote in obscurity, Morris (who died in 1937) was one of the formative influences on modern fantasy: in his novels, The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed (1914) and Book of Three Dragons (1930), he essentially invented the Celtic fantasy subgenre. This volume gathers all of Morris's shorter fiction, much of which was published pseudonymously in such out-of-the-way places as The Theosophical Path. Thus Anderson's collection offers students of fantasy a rare opportunity to rediscover one of the category's founding fathers. Unfortunately, the tales are unlikely to interest the majority of fantasy readers-Morris's prose is dense and antiquated, and his stories often slowed by repetitious description. Taken one or two at a time, the antique tone and languid pacing provide an intriguing change from today's action-packed fantasy, but together they grow rather tedious. Still, if only for the stories' historical and academic importance, this is an illuminating collection from an early master.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Though he wrote in obscurity, Morris (who died in 1937) was one of the formative influences on modern fantasy: in his novels, The Fates of the Princes of Dyfed (1914) and Book of Three Dragons (1930), he essentially invented the Celtic fantasy subgenre. This volume gathers all of Morris's shorter fiction, much of which was published pseudonymously in such out-of-the-way places as The Theosophical Path. Thus Anderson's collection offers students of fantasy a rare opportunity to rediscover one of the category's founding fathers. Unfortunately, the tales are unlikely to interest the majority of fantasy readers-Morris's prose is dense and antiquated, and his stories often slowed by repetitious description. Taken one or two at a time, the antique tone and languid pacing provide an intriguing change from today's action-packed fantasy, but together they grow rather tedious. Still, if only for the stories' historical and academic importance, this is an illuminating collection from an early master. (Mar.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
This collection of short fiction from one of fantasy literature's seminal authors includes a number of pseudonymous works as well as a thoughtful essay on Morris's often-overlooked contributons to the genre.
Roland Green
According to the scholarly introduction to these short stories by the author of "The Chalchiuhite Dragon" (1992), Morris (1879-1937) was one of the founders of fantasy derived from the mythology and folklore of his native Wales. The tales here include a baker's dozen of creditable Celtic stories, stories using Chinese and other cultures' myths and general backgrounds, and stories set in Morris' own time and place, which he exploited for both fantastic and humorous purposes. Morris' style may strike many as a trifle anachronistic in a good many spots, but no book containing stories of the caliber of "The King and the Three Ascetics," "A Mermaid's Tragedy," or "The Last Adventure of Don Quixote"--to mention three outstanding titles--is a mere literary curiosity. Morris' other work, which includes plays, novels, and poetry, is apparently also scheduled for reprinting, so shelve this one beside "Chalchiuhite Dragon" and keep an eye peeled for future Morris volumes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312853099
Publisher:
Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
Publication date:
02/28/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.45(w) x 9.53(h) x 1.38(d)

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