Dragon Strike (Age of Fire Series #4)

Dragon Strike (Age of Fire Series #4)

4.4 46
by E. E. Knight
     
 

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A dark and riveting fantasy of three dragon siblings, from the author of The Vampire Earth novels

The fourth in the Age of Fire series following Dragon Champion, Dragon Avenger, and Dragon Outcast...

Scattered across a continent and scarred by their harsh experiences on the path to adulthood, the three dragon siblings are…  See more details below

Overview

A dark and riveting fantasy of three dragon siblings, from the author of The Vampire Earth novels

The fourth in the Age of Fire series following Dragon Champion, Dragon Avenger, and Dragon Outcast...

Scattered across a continent and scarred by their harsh experiences on the path to adulthood, the three dragon siblings are among the last of a dying breed, the final hope for their species’ survival.

After being separated by dwarf slave traders who found their nest, the three—AuRon, the rare scaleless gray; Wistala, the green female; and Copper, the embittered cripple—are reunited. But their reunion is not a happy one, since the three find themselves at odds over the coming human war. AuRon thinks dragons should have no part in the affairs of humans. Wistala believes dragons and man can peacefully co-exist. And Copper has designs of his own on the world.

And the civilized humans who have turned to Copper for assistance against their savage enemies have just given him the perfect opportunity to fulfill his plans…

 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The entertaining fourth Age of Fire novel (after 2007's Dragon Outcast) reunites three dragon siblings in a land at the threshold of major change. When scaleless AuRon the Gray hears rumors of his long-lost sister, Wistala, he leaves his family on the Isle of Ice to search for her. Their paths cross in Lavadome, where their outcast brother, RuGaard, now rules. Although some blame RuGaard for a recent food blight, the more likely source is Ghioz's masked Red Queen, who wants to make Lavadome part of her empire. Brought together by chance, the siblings must overcome their differences and persuade rival nations to stand together against the Red Queen's forces. Knight turns the familiar features of epic fantasy upside down in this unique world of medieval politics and ancient magic seen through the eyes of dragons. (Dec.)

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From the Publisher
"Knight turns the familiar features of epic fantasy upside down in this unique world of medieval politics and ancient magic seen through the eyes of dragons." —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440643415
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/02/2008
Series:
Age of Fire , #4
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
164,171
File size:
672 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

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From the Publisher
"Knight turns the familiar features of epic fantasy upside down in this unique world of medieval politics and ancient magic seen through the eyes of dragons." —-Publishers Weekly

Meet the Author

E.E. Knight graduated from Northern Illinois University with a double major in history and political science, then made his way through a number of jobs that related to neither. In addition to such recent Age of Fire Novels as Dragon Rule and Dragon Fate, he is the author of the long-running Vampire Earth series chronicling David Valentine's rebellion against the Kurian Order, which includes Way of the Wolf; Choice of the Cat; Tale of the Thunderbolt; Valentine's Rising; Valentine's Exile; Valentine's Resolve; Fall with Honor; Winter Duty; and March in Country. He lives in Chicago.

 

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Dragon Strike (Age of Fire Series #4) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
After being separated by dwarf slave traders who killed their mother and sister, the three dragon siblings (AuRon, Wistala, and Copper) suffer differing experiences on their way to adulthood. AuRon mated and has a family on the Isle of Ice, which is devoid of humanoids (see DRAGON CHAMPION). His sister Wistala has become a scholar librarian in the Hypatia Empire and believes in intermingling of the species (see DRAGON AVENGER)S. Finally Copper has become the Tyn of the Lavadome who places the needs of dragons before his own (see DRAGON OUTCAST).

While Wisteria works in her library, a demon captures her; after days of torture, the Fire Maidens rescue her and take her to Lavadome where she listens to the Tyn while realizing he is her brother just before AuRon arrives as the emissary of the Red Queen of Ghioz who seeks to conquer Hypatia. The Red Queen offers an alliance with the Lavadome that would make the dragons available to her warriors. Tyn decides for dragonkind to survive, they must live above ground instead of in the mouths of volcanoes hiding and praying they will not be found. He sends his sister to her home and his brother to his family as each prepares for the Red Queen. They all know if allied to her she would betray them.

Book four of the Age of Fire brings this glorious fantasy to a rousing finish with the three sibling stars of the previous novels finally coming together. Throughout the saga, dragons are the protagonists while the hominids (man, dwarf, elf and blighters) are their natural enemies constantly encroaching and killing. In DRAGON STRIKE, the dragons conclude that to survive they must fight even if that means going down in flames; pacifism means death for sure. E.E. Knight makes his world of dragons soar as the audience roots for them to succeed.

Harriet Klausner
Shalion More than 1 year ago
I think that Dragons Strike is an excellent extension of all three plotlines started in the first three books. We are definitely moving into a broader scope of Knights world now that all three dragons have grown. It was a little strange reading one of the books without starting with a hatchling right out of the egg, but Knight gets you to the action quickly as always. The book, while perhaps not quite as touching and action filled as the third novel does fabulously in the latter and as always, Knight paints a marvelous world that drips with detail. I definitely recommend this to any fan of the series and to those new to it, go and check out Dragon Champion. That is a fantastic start to a fantastic series. Each of the characters are already deep, each with their own books and weaving them together like this is an accomplisment in literary art.
Anonymous-Alias More than 1 year ago
Knight ended the three dragons, AuRon, Wistala, and the Copper, with unusually happy, neatly tied endings for a fantasy series. Normally writers end a book in a series with a cliff-hanger or a travesty, to make it easier to write a beginning for the next book in the series. Knight, with his writing skills to which I humbly bow to, chose to take on the challenge of writing three books on three dragon siblings all ending with (relatively) happy endings. ***SPOILER FOR FIRST THREE AGE OF FIRE BOOKS*** AuRon and the Copper mated gaining control of their own kingdoms and mates. (Although AuRon seems to have gotten the slightly bitter end of the stick with a bitten off tail and the Isle of Ice compared to the Coppers clamped wing and Lavadome.)And Wistala ends up with Mossbell and avenging her brother. ***END OF SPOILER*** However Knight manages to create an adversary that ties the three siblings together once more. Although I am a little sad about DharSii and Wistala not mating I am looking forward to Knight's next masterpiece. Once again Knight's plots, sentence structure, and originality blows any other fantasy/sci-fi writer I have read so far out of the water. And I am glad to see AuRon (my favourite of the dragons by several by far, closely followed with Wistala and DharSii) again.
Ampris More than 1 year ago
This one was too political for me and I found myself losing focus while reading it. The next two books are a better read since they focus more on the characters and less on the politics. My least favorite of the six in the series.
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Is here.
kelron More than 1 year ago
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