Dragon Virus

Dragon Virus

4.4 17
by Laura Anne Gilman
     
 
It began soon after the Millennium. Reports of newborns with strange malformations, too weak to live…caused by a single genetic mutation. Or, as the press quickly dubbed it, the Dragon Virus. Scientists predicted that it was an evolutionary dead end; that the mutation would burn itself out quickly; that it was nothing to be worried about.

They were

Overview

It began soon after the Millennium. Reports of newborns with strange malformations, too weak to live…caused by a single genetic mutation. Or, as the press quickly dubbed it, the Dragon Virus. Scientists predicted that it was an evolutionary dead end; that the mutation would burn itself out quickly; that it was nothing to be worried about.

They were wrong.


Every racial type. Almost every continent. No known cause. Human-created, maybe. Or just God, throwing the dice. Infecting us, warping us. Tied into our genetic code, from here on in. No known treatment. No idea where even to begin.

Everything was about to change.

Six connected stories, charting the end – beginning – of everything we know, everything we fear, everything we hope for….

With an Introduction by Walter Jon Williams

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015797510
Publisher:
Book View Cafe
Publication date:
11/27/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
100
Sales rank:
915,911
File size:
486 KB

Meet the Author

Laura Anne Gilman is a former book editor who went to the dark side of full-time writing in 2003. Her novel credits include ten Cosa Nostradamus books (the Retrievers and PSI series), the Nebula-nominated The Vineart War trilogy, and the forthcoming Portals duology, Heart of Briar and Soul of Fire (August/October 2013).
Wearing her editorial hat, she is the author of Practical Meerkat’s 52 Bits of Useful Info for the Young (and Old) Writer, available through the Book View Café Ebookstore.
Laura Anne also writes mysteries under the name L A Kornetsky, and isn’t quite sure how many short stories and novellas she’s had published — more than 30, less than 50 (number subject to increase).
She lives in New York City, where she also runs d.y.m.k. productions, an editorial services company.

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Dragon Virus 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
fireun More than 1 year ago
“They say the end is nigh. I think we’re living in the aftermath already (Dragon Virus, pg. 69).” It looks like such a small book- unassuming, taking up so little shelf space. But it is a trick. As soon as you start to read it will spread through your brain, unavoidable as the spread of the virus the book tracks. It is a cascade in six parts, a staggering move through religion and science before settling firmly into a desperate dig at humanity itself. There have been many looks at mutation, but there has been nothing ever written that hits like this. Ms. Gilman cuts through to the bare bones of what it is to be human, lays it there for all of us to examine and accept or reject as we see fit. No punches are pulled amidst her beautifully stark prose. Dragon Virus is a book that is saying something. But the reader has to decide whether or not they are willing to listen. It starts with the little uncomfortable things- visions of apocalypse, Raptures full of dragon wings. And then the dragons become all too real. It is an unexplained mutation, the Long gene, dragons come down to warp the basic recipe of humanity. Babies die, born with mutations that could not support life. No known cause. No treatment. But then babies start to live, the mutations becoming viable, and the real problems start. Dragon Virus is a stunning book, weaving words into image and emotion that will kick you in the gut and pull you through page after page- desperate to see just what sort of resolution will be reached. It is beautiful- the harsh beauty of everything grand and dangerous in nature. And just as enthralling.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like dragon books, so this caught my eye.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gilman's stories go right to the questions of what it means to be human, and what it means to grow up in a world that is itself, within an inescapable torrent of Change. Her use of young adults as most of her protagonists, a time of life marked by upheaval and change even for normal people, reinforces and deepens the themes that she is trying to evoke in the stories. On those grounds, and in that métier, Gilman is stunningly successful. Her writing is amazingly evocative and wrings out emotion from even the most hard-hearted reader. The tragic ending to one story brought tears to my eyes. I don't think that Gilman's story cycle here is for every reader, and frankly, until I finished it, I wasn't sure it was for me, either. To an extent, I still think I was not quite the right demographic for the book, even though I have previously enjoyed her fantasy fiction. I do generally prefer my science fiction to be more technological and less sociological, more Greg Bear and less Ursula Le Guin. Readers who feel the same as I do might be somewhat let down by Dragon Virus, or find it wasn't quite the perfect reading fit for them. On the other hand, if you are the kind of reader who could care less about the difference between 5-Methylcytosine and Uracil, and want to take a potent ride through a changing future, exploring themes and ideas that resonate as much in the modern day as in her darkly evolving future, Laura Anne Gilman's Dragon Virus is definitely commended to you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Im due tomrorow too!!"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*slips in*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sms says we can raid a clan!!!