Dragons of the Watch: A Novel

( 7 )

Overview

Trapped in a forgotten city, bound by secrets, Ellie and Bealomondore must enlist the dragons of the watch to find freedom.

Ellie knows exactly where she is going. She just wants to experience the pomp and circumstance of a royal wedding, then settle into a simple life with a country husband.

With too many choices, Bealomondore’s future is a tangle of possibilities. He is respected, well-known, and ...

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Dragons of the Watch: A Novel

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Overview

Trapped in a forgotten city, bound by secrets, Ellie and Bealomondore must enlist the dragons of the watch to find freedom.

Ellie knows exactly where she is going. She just wants to experience the pomp and circumstance of a royal wedding, then settle into a simple life with a country husband.

With too many choices, Bealomondore’s future is a tangle of possibilities. He is respected, well-known, and admired among the elite of Chiril, but Wulder demands he narrow his focus and follow his Creator, one step at a time.

Both Ellie and Bealomondore’s plans are thwarted when they find themselves lost in an isolated city. As they discern the needs of a group of wild children and a very old man, clues began to surface and a bigger picture is revealed. With the help of the dragons of the watch, can the two tumanhofers find the way out—and perhaps discover their connection to something greater than themselves?

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Donita K. Paul’s DragonKeeper Chronicles and Chiril Chronicles

“The writing is crisp and the setting imaginative. This series will speak to all ages of Christian readers.”
Publisher’s Weekly

“Donita K. Paul never fails to satisfy the imagination and delight the soul.… This is fantasy that truly illuminates reality.”
—JIM DENNEY, author of the Timebenders Series

“Donita K. Paul’s vivid imagery and startling plot twists will delight fans.”
—KACY BARNETT-GRAMCKOW, author of the Genesis Trilogy

“I wouldn’t expect anything less from Donita K. Paul, as she always gives us a delightful read: intriguing, challenging, and full of blessing.”
—KATHRYNMACKEL, author of Vanished

“Donita K. Paul possesses a unique talent for instilling deep wisdom and spiritual truth in a story that is engrossing and satisfying.… She is one of my favorite authors.”
—HANNAH ALEXANDER, author of Silent Pledge

“Donita K. Paul’s inventiveness never ceases to amaze. Fresh ideas for new races of people and unusual creatures keep flowing from her gifted pen.”
—JILL ELIZABETH NELSON, author of the To Catch a Thief Series

“Shut your eyes, hold your breath, and plunge into the unshackled imagination of Donita K. Paul.”
—LINDA WICHMAN, author of Legend of the Emerald Rose

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781400073412
  • Publisher: The Doubleday Religious Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/4/2011
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 495,246
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Donita K. Paul is the author of The Dragons of Chiril, Dragons of the Valley, and the bestselling DragonKeeper Chronicles with more than a quarter of a million books in print. She enjoys cooking, beading, stamping, knitting, and her grandsons. Not necessarily in that order. Visit her website at DonitaKPaul.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Invitation

      Ellie sat on her favorite boulder and looked Tak right in the eyes, telling him what was on her mind. “Gramps shouldn’t have taught me to read.”
      Tak responded as he usually did when he received Ellie’s confidences. He lowered his head, placing it on her knee for a rub. 
      Ellie obliged her pet, stroking the white hair between his nubby horns with one hand while digging in the pocket of her homespun pinafore with the other. The mountain breeze toyed with the paper she withdrew. With difficulty, she smoothed the small poster out on her other knee. Dirty and wrinkled, it still made her heart beat a little faster.
                  
                              Royal Wedding and Coronation
                                          Princess Tipper
                                                   and
                     Prince Jayrus, Dragonkeeper and Paladin
               
                              All invited to the celebration

      “All invited. But Ellicinderpart Clarenbessipawl and her goat Tak can’t come. No chaperone, no travel. Ma and Da aren’t interested. And Gramps just laughs. ‘You’ll see. You’ll see,’ is all he says. He should take me himself.”
      Her younger brother’s shrill yell came from the knoll rising out of the river to the east. “Ellie! Ellie!”
      He stood on the hill, grinning like a bear with a paw in the honey hive and his face red from running. His stubby tumanhofer body bounced with excitement. He held his fists above his head and whirled them around in circles. Something had set him off.
      She stood and hollered back. “You be calling me by my proper name out in the open ’n’ at the top of your lungs, Gustustharinback. Ma will tan yer hide if she’s finding out you disgrace the family with such shabby care of our dignity.”
      When he saw her, he cupped his hands around his mouth and shouted, “Yer wanted at home. Itta be good news.” 
      That information didn’t impress her. Probably a delivery of the bolt of muslin ordered, which meant she’d be cutting and dyeing lengths for making new clothes. Not exciting news at all.
      “Can it wait?” She gestured behind her to the scattered goat herd. “I’ll have to gather Tak’s clan if I’m to come home now.”
      “I’ll come help you.” Gustus charged down the hill toward the footbridge across the river.
      Ellie stared at him for a moment with her mouth hanging open. The good news had nothing to do with cloth. Her brother would never voluntarily help bring in the goats for something as mundane as new clothes. He scurried down the path, slipping some on the loose rocks. But the precarious descent did not slow him a bit. Even in the narrower patches, where exposed roots of arranndon bushes tripped careless hikers, her sturdy brother skidded downward.
      Folding the royal celebration notice into a small square, Ellie stuffed it back in her pocket. She turned away from watching her brother’s progress and nudged the goat. “Come on, Tak. You find the nannies, and I’ll find the billies.”
      Ellie went one direction and Tak another. In a few minutes, she located the fifteen goats that formed the herd. Mostly young males, these animals preferred the rockier terrain. She suspected it had to do with their perpetual game of I’m-up-highest.
      She clicked her tongue and tapped her staff on a rock. Their heads rose as if all attached to the same string, though they didn’t come right away. Each one chewed what was in his mouth and casually left his place one by one. Taking a serene amble down the hillside, they passed her, heading toward the bridge and home.
      When the last one clomped by, Ellie rested her staff on her shoulder and followed. Tak already had the nannies plodding along the bank toward the footbridge. Gustustharinback trailed the nannies and carried the smallest of the baby goats in his arms.
      He shouted when he caught sight of his sister. “Hurry! Aunt and Uncle Blamenyellomont are at the house. I can’t tell you the surprise, and I’m gonna burst with keeping my tongue from waggin’ and you from knowin’.”
      She tapped her staff on the rock beneath her feet. The billies scampered before her, picking up her impatience and gratefully heading for home. Even after eating all day, they appreciated the handfuls of button grain they got from the farmer’s younger children.
      With the goat hoofs pounding on the wooden bridge, Ellie couldn’t hear or be heard. So she waited until she’d caught up with her brother on the other side.
      “What’s with all the falderal, Gustus?”
      She watched as he forced a glare onto his face, erasing the impudent grin he’d been wearing. “You are to call me by my proper name if I have to call you by yours.”
      “There’s a difference between shouting ‘Ellie’ and speaking ‘Gustus’ quietly.” She grabbed his arm. “Now tell me, or I’ll toss you into the river.”
      He pressed his lips together and gave her his most obstinate glower. The corners of his lips twitched, and she knew he wanted to laugh. She let go. She couldn’t really dunk him while he carried the small kid.
      “Why are our aunt and uncle here?”
      “Can’t tell you that either. But they’s only stopping, not staying. We’d better hurry.”
      Ellie lost Gustustharinback’s help as soon as they came in sight of the pens. He scuttled down the last hill and opened the gate but then ran through the goat barn, across the yard, and into the house.
      The herd followed the leader through the opening and took up different places to observe their world. Ellie and Gustus had put many odd things within the goat pen for the animals to climb on. Old wooden benches, barrels, a huge thick branch they had pulled with the donkey’s help, and crates littered the ground. The goats enjoyed scrambling up, over, and around the obstacles.
      Tak stayed at Ellie’s side as she put water in the trough and fastened the barn door securely open so the animals could come in if they wanted. He followed her out the door on the other side of the barn and waited patiently while she latched it shut.
      Entering the back door so she could wash before meeting their visitors, Ellie noticed that the kitchen showed signs of serving tea. Her mother must have prepared refreshments to carry into the common room. Through the pantry door, she could see empty spots on the shelves, which meant the good china pot and the blue glass dishes were being used.
      Warm water sat in a tub in the sink, and she used that to wash her face and hands. She pulled the scarf off her head, gathered her long, curly black locks into a ponytail and used the scarf to tie it in place. Wisps of hair immediately escaped and framed her tanned face. She washed her face again as if she could rid herself of the look of a farm girl. Hopefully Aunt Tiffenbeth wouldn’t make that tired old comment: “Your blue eyes would be more attractive if you scrubbed away some of that mud you use for face cream.”
      Voices from the family’s conversation drifted through the partially open door. Aunt Tiffenbeth quarreled with Ellie’s father. 
      “Brother, you are wrong in this. Ellicinderpart is your eldest child and way past the age to be in the village looking for a husband.” 
      “If there’s a man good enough for her, he can just come courting here.” Her father’s voice rumbled in the wood-paneled room, and Ellie did not even have to strain to hear him. She stepped closer to the door in order not to miss a single word her aunt spoke.
      “You are the most vexing man. That is not going to happen. It isn’t the way of things, and you know it. You’re selfish and your mind is rootbound.”
      Only his older sister could get away with talking like that to Ellie’s father. She probably ought to go in before the discussion escalated to verbal warfare. She finished wiping her hands and draped the towel over one of the kitchen chairs around the square table.
      “The girl is needed here.”
      “The young woman is your unpaid servant.”

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    a superb tale with a strong cast

    The oldest of eight children, Country bumpkin Ellicinderpart Clarenbessipawl talks to her best friend Tak the goat on how unfair life is. Everyone received an invitation to the royal wedding and coronation of Princess Tipper and Prince Tayrus. Her Aunt Tiffenbeth and Uncle Stemikenjon will escort Ellie to the royal wedding in Ragar.

    However, Tak has other plans as the goat wanders away; she follows Tak to take the goat home before her trek to the weeding of the century, but Ellie gets lost. They end up in a strange city in which giant little kids mistake Tak for a dog and give chase. Famous artist Graddapotmorphit Bealomondore of Greeson rescues them and informs her that they are the only tumanhofers in Rumbard City. He explains the occupants consist of one elderly librarian, a horde of feral very tall six-year-old urohms and seven tiny dragons; he is unaware of the other essence. Considered a hero by the affluent of Chiril, Bealomondtore is on a quest to follow the Creator, but currently he plans to find a way for Ellie, Tak and himself to escape from being bottled up in Rumbard City, after that he will take care of the kids and his heart.

    The latest Donita K. Paul "Dragon" Christian allegorical fantasy (see Dragonlight and Dragons of the Valley) is a superb tale with a strong cast especially the lead duet; while several of the kids have different personalities. Their efforts to escape the mysterious city make for a fast-paced story line loaded with action as the lead couple heeding Wulder's advice to follow the Creator by taking one step at a time to unravel the enigma of Rumbard City.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 25, 2011

    Great Ending

    She has a breathtaking way to end her books. I can't wait for the next seres she wirtes

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 2, 2011

    delightful fairy adventure

    Reviewed by Dr. Karen Hutchins Pirnot for Readers Favorite

    Ellie is a member of the tumanhofer species. She is a goat herder who is educated and eager for adventure. Ellie is delighted when her aunt and uncle take her for a vacation to see the wedding and next coronation of the king and queen of the kingdom. Along the way, Ellie falls into an extended adventure when she goes to rescue her frisky pet goat Tax.

    Ellie finds herself going through a time warp into a city contained within a bottle. The city houses dozens of perpetually young six year old urhomns, a species of gentle and intelligent giants. The children are quarrelsome and unruly until Ellie and her friend Bealomondore, an artistic tumanhofer also trapped in the bottle city, team up to tame the children and find a way to extricate themselves from the unwelcoming bottle city. They solicit the assistance of an Old One who is a librarian and several minor dragons who have various helpful abilities.

    This is a delightful fairy adventure for children in the middle grades. It is filled with visual images which will certainly stimulate the interest of both girls and boys. There is just enough mystery to keep the child reading and just enough of a sense of self-efficacy in the main characters so that the child reader will identify with the character and begin to act out his or her own fantasies. The book has an all-knowing figure to which children of many religions would identify.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 15, 2011

    Cant+wait+for+this+book%21%21%21

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 7, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

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