Drama of Fallen France: Reading la Comedie sans Tickets [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Drama of Fallen France examines various dramatic works written and/or produced in Paris during the four years of Nazi occupation and explains what they may have meant to their original audiences. Because of widespread financial support from the new French government at Vichy, the former French capital underwent a renaissance of theatre during this period, and both the public playhouses and the private theatres provided an amazing array of new productions and revivals. Some of the plays considered here are ...
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Drama of Fallen France: Reading la Comedie sans Tickets

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Overview

The Drama of Fallen France examines various dramatic works written and/or produced in Paris during the four years of Nazi occupation and explains what they may have meant to their original audiences. Because of widespread financial support from the new French government at Vichy, the former French capital underwent a renaissance of theatre during this period, and both the public playhouses and the private theatres provided an amazing array of new productions and revivals. Some of the plays considered here are well known: Anouilh's Antigone, Sartre's The Flies, Claudel's The Satin Slipper. Others have remained obscure, such as Cocteau's The Typewriter, Giraudoux's The Apollo of Marsac, and Montherlant's Nobody's Son; and two-André Obey's Eight Hundred Meters and Simone Jollivet's The Princess of Ursins-have remained virtually unread since the early 1940s. In examining French culture under the Vichy regime and the Nazis, Kenneth Krauss links the politics of gender and sexuality with the more traditional political concepts of collaboration and resistance. A final chapter on Truffaut's 1980 film, The Last Métro, demonstrates how the present manages to rewrite and revision the complex and seemingly contradictory reality of the past.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780791485798
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press
  • Publication date: 9/18/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 857 KB

Meet the Author

Kenneth Krauss is Associate Professor of Drama at The College of Saint Rose and the author of Private Readings/Public Texts: Playreaders’ Constructs of Theatre Audiences. He is also the coeditor (with Nancy J. Doran Hazelton) of Maxwell Anderson and the New York Stage.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Overture
Ch. 1 A Queer Premiere: Jean Cocteau's The Typewriter 1
Ch. 2 Collabo Beefcake and Resistant Reception: Ambiguity in Andre Obey's Eight Hundred Meters and The Suppliant Women 35
Ch. 3 French Identity: The Intended Audience for Jean Giraudoux's The Apollo of Marsac 61
Ch. 4 The Limits of Opportunism: Simone Jollivet's The Princess of Ursins 81
Ch. 5 The Politics of Intention: Jean Anouilh's Antigone via Oreste 105
Ch. 6 The Politics of Reception: Jean-Paul Sartre's The Flies 129
Ch. 7 A Politics of Sexuality: Henry de Montherlant's Nobody's Son 145
Ch. 8 The Politics of Impersonation: Casting and Recasting Paul Claudel's The Satin Slipper 175
Epilogue: Catching The Last Metro: Francois Truffaut's Portrayal of Occupation Drama and Sexuality 191
Finale 207
Notes 211
Bibliography 235
Name Index and Literary Works 249
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