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Draping for Fashion Design / Edition 4

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Overview

This workbook provides basic material on design and patternmaking, with an emphasis on instructions for draping. It acknowledges dramatic industry changes with the integration of computers into virtually every step of the apparel manufacturing process, and introduces readers to the functions and skills needed to utilize this highly versatile and efficient tool. Narrative sections and illustrations cover the topics of basic patterns, bodices, skirts, pants, collars, sleeves, and pockets. Additional chapters on sportswear, functional finishes, and draping, supply even more explanation on simplified methods currently employed in the industry. For anyone preparing for a career, or interested in learning the latest techniques, in the fashion industry.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131109377
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/12/2004
  • Series: Pearson Custom Library: Fashion Series
  • Edition description: 4TH
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 8.23 (w) x 10.82 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Read an Excerpt

In preparation for this new edition of Draping for Fashion Design, we consulted with current users of the text and identified areas where revisions or new information would be helpful. As a result, we have made some changes and added new material throughout the book.

The book now has a new introduction to provide some background about the work of fashion designers and the fashion industry. A brief discussion of the Apparel Company and its divisions is followed by a description of the various customers who buy apparel. We introduce the attributes of seasonal collections, suggest sources of inspiration, and describe the process that leads from the designer's idea to the prototype for production.

Draping, as the course is currently taught in various design schools and universities, includes instruction in sewing when students carry draping projects to completion into finished garments. Since the course curriculum integrates sewing with draping, we have added "sewing tips" for many of the draping projects. Clear and simple sewing instructions are now integrated with draping into one textbook for a comprehensive draping course. We wish to emphasize, however, that no attempt has been made to make this a sewing book. The "sewing tips," which have been interspersed throughout, wherever they might be useful, merely address special sewing problems as they arise in a draping class.

We have added a section that gives instructions for draping "The Bias Slip Dress" in "The Shift" chapter, and we have added a section on "Swimsuits" to the "Sportswear and Casual Wear" chapter. Also, in order to enhance clarity, we have revised diagrams and added new illustrations.

Although computers are used as design and communication tools throughout the industry, we believe that designers still need a basic background of draping in fabric. By draping, the design student acquires the sense of proportion, which can only be developed by seeing the design take shape on the human figure. A feel for texture and the drapability of fabric can only be acquired by actually handling the fabric. Computers are, indeed, used to sketch and draft patterns for new designs, but to do this well requires the ability to correctly visualize the proportions of the finished garment. This skill is developed only by experience with full-size three-dimensional models.

We gratefully acknowledge the support and help that we have received from our colleagues at the Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.). The techniques used in this book have been developed over the course of many years of teaching and experimentation by the Fashion Design faculty at F I.T Refinements in precision were developed as various methods were tested at faculty workshops and in the classroom. Both students and teachers contributed to this process and it is impossible for us to mention everyone who participated over the years. There are, however, some people who were particularly instrumental in the development of the draping curriculum at F I.T Most noteworthy are Professor Emeritus Ernestine Kopp, the first chairperson of the Fashion Design Department, and Professor Emeritus Vittorina Rolfo, who for many years was the assistant chairperson and in that capacity was responsible for the development of new teachers in the department. Her expert guidance in the organization and presentation of the material is remembered gratefully by both of us.

We are also deeply indebted to the many faculty members from numerous colleges and universities who, in response to our inquiry, thoughtfully pointed out areas where Draping for Fashion Design might be made more useful. The information they shared was invaluable. We carefully considered all responses and, wherever possible, followed their suggestions. We especially want to thank Professor Sally I. Helvenston of Michigan State University for pointing out the difficulties encountered when beginners attempted to drape the Peter Pan collar. In response, we included a simpler method combining draping with patternmaking. Professor Sharon Bell of the Academy of Art College, San Francisco, and Professor Anne J. Smock of the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science, as well as several others, suggested a larger format and more illustrations for additional clarity.

This would have been an impossible task without the unstintingly generous help from currently working designers and other industry professionals. They gave us the opportunity to observe firsthand today's methods of fashion design and pattern development. They shared with us the benefits of years of professional experience, gave us access to their sample rooms, and finally, reviewed our material after it was completed.

Many thanks go to Mary Ann Ferro, designer for Woolrich Industries and adjunct assistant professor at F I.T., for sharing with us her method of developing the unstructured drop shoulder jacket. Anthony J. Nuzzo, senior director at Victoria's Secret Stores and adjunct assistant professor at FI.T, worked with us on techniques of draping basic patterns in knitted fabrics and the new section on swimsuits. Lisa Donofrio, freelance designer and instructor at RIM, explained to us the particulars of sweater design. Benetta Barnett, director of merchandising, Cenett International/ Arrow Inc., was most helpful regarding the procedures of planning, sourcing, and executing a line. Lisa Goldman, CAD/CAM systems director for Donnkenny Apparel, Inc., Wayne Slossberg of Lectra Systems, and Don Newcomb of F.I.T. worked with us regarding the state-of-the-art use of computers in the apparel industry.

A very special thank you is due to Professor Wallace Sloves of F I.T. for sharing with us the know-how he acquired throughout many years of experience fitting garments on live models and couture customers. His help with the section on fitting was invaluable. We are also deeply indebted to our friend and colleague, the designer George Simonton. He and his sample room staff worked with us in developing the chapter on tailored garment design. But George was more than a technical resource; he also served as an enthusiastic cheerleader along every step of the way as this book took shape.

In getting this edition ready for publication, we received unstintingly generous technical support from Dr. Robert Jaffe and Nirdi Relis. Thank you, thank you!

Finally, we want to especially thank our students, who gave us essential feedback and with their enthusiasm inspired us to go on from the beginning to the completion of this work.

HILDE JAFFE NURIE RELIS

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Table of Contents

Foreword.
Preface.
1. Introduction.
2. Basic Patterns.
3. Bodices.
4. Skirts.
5. Pants.
6. The Midriff and Yokes.
7. Collars.
8. Sleeves.
9. The Shift.
10. The Princess Dress.
11. Sportswear and Casual Wear.
12. Tailored Garments.
13. Functional Finishes.
14. Pockets.
15. Draping in Fabric and Fitting.
Selected Bibliography.
Index.
Read More Show Less

Preface

In preparation for this new edition of Draping for Fashion Design, we consulted with current users of the text and identified areas where revisions or new information would be helpful. As a result, we have made some changes and added new material throughout the book.

The book now has a new introduction to provide some background about the work of fashion designers and the fashion industry. A brief discussion of the Apparel Company and its divisions is followed by a description of the various customers who buy apparel. We introduce the attributes of seasonal collections, suggest sources of inspiration, and describe the process that leads from the designer's idea to the prototype for production.

Draping, as the course is currently taught in various design schools and universities, includes instruction in sewing when students carry draping projects to completion into finished garments. Since the course curriculum integrates sewing with draping, we have added "sewing tips" for many of the draping projects. Clear and simple sewing instructions are now integrated with draping into one textbook for a comprehensive draping course. We wish to emphasize, however, that no attempt has been made to make this a sewing book. The "sewing tips," which have been interspersed throughout, wherever they might be useful, merely address special sewing problems as they arise in a draping class.

We have added a section that gives instructions for draping "The Bias Slip Dress" in "The Shift" chapter, and we have added a section on "Swimsuits" to the "Sportswear and Casual Wear" chapter. Also, in order to enhance clarity, we have revised diagrams and added new illustrations.

Although computers are used as design and communication tools throughout the industry, we believe that designers still need a basic background of draping in fabric. By draping, the design student acquires the sense of proportion, which can only be developed by seeing the design take shape on the human figure. A feel for texture and the drapability of fabric can only be acquired by actually handling the fabric. Computers are, indeed, used to sketch and draft patterns for new designs, but to do this well requires the ability to correctly visualize the proportions of the finished garment. This skill is developed only by experience with full-size three-dimensional models.

We gratefully acknowledge the support and help that we have received from our colleagues at the Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.). The techniques used in this book have been developed over the course of many years of teaching and experimentation by the Fashion Design faculty at F I.T Refinements in precision were developed as various methods were tested at faculty workshops and in the classroom. Both students and teachers contributed to this process and it is impossible for us to mention everyone who participated over the years. There are, however, some people who were particularly instrumental in the development of the draping curriculum at F I.T Most noteworthy are Professor Emeritus Ernestine Kopp, the first chairperson of the Fashion Design Department, and Professor Emeritus Vittorina Rolfo, who for many years was the assistant chairperson and in that capacity was responsible for the development of new teachers in the department. Her expert guidance in the organization and presentation of the material is remembered gratefully by both of us.

We are also deeply indebted to the many faculty members from numerous colleges and universities who, in response to our inquiry, thoughtfully pointed out areas where Draping for Fashion Design might be made more useful. The information they shared was invaluable. We carefully considered all responses and, wherever possible, followed their suggestions. We especially want to thank Professor Sally I. Helvenston of Michigan State University for pointing out the difficulties encountered when beginners attempted to drape the Peter Pan collar. In response, we included a simpler method combining draping with patternmaking. Professor Sharon Bell of the Academy of Art College, San Francisco, and Professor Anne J. Smock of the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science, as well as several others, suggested a larger format and more illustrations for additional clarity.

This would have been an impossible task without the unstintingly generous help from currently working designers and other industry professionals. They gave us the opportunity to observe firsthand today's methods of fashion design and pattern development. They shared with us the benefits of years of professional experience, gave us access to their sample rooms, and finally, reviewed our material after it was completed.

Many thanks go to Mary Ann Ferro, designer for Woolrich Industries and adjunct assistant professor at F I.T., for sharing with us her method of developing the unstructured drop shoulder jacket. Anthony J. Nuzzo, senior director at Victoria's Secret Stores and adjunct assistant professor at FI.T, worked with us on techniques of draping basic patterns in knitted fabrics and the new section on swimsuits. Lisa Donofrio, freelance designer and instructor at RIM, explained to us the particulars of sweater design. Benetta Barnett, director of merchandising, Cenett International/ Arrow Inc., was most helpful regarding the procedures of planning, sourcing, and executing a line. Lisa Goldman, CAD/CAM systems director for Donnkenny Apparel, Inc., Wayne Slossberg of Lectra Systems, and Don Newcomb of F.I.T. worked with us regarding the state-of-the-art use of computers in the apparel industry.

A very special thank you is due to Professor Wallace Sloves of F I.T. for sharing with us the know-how he acquired throughout many years of experience fitting garments on live models and couture customers. His help with the section on fitting was invaluable. We are also deeply indebted to our friend and colleague, the designer George Simonton. He and his sample room staff worked with us in developing the chapter on tailored garment design. But George was more than a technical resource; he also served as an enthusiastic cheerleader along every step of the way as this book took shape.

In getting this edition ready for publication, we received unstintingly generous technical support from Dr. Robert Jaffe and Nirdi Relis. Thank you, thank you!

Finally, we want to especially thank our students, who gave us essential feedback and with their enthusiasm inspired us to go on from the beginning to the completion of this work.

HILDE JAFFE NURIE RELIS

Read More Show Less

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