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Draw 3-D
     

Draw 3-D

5.0 2
by Doug Dubosque, Doug DuBosque (Illustrator)
 

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Using easy-to-follow, step-by-step sketches, DuBosque introduces readers to the techniques of three-dimensional drawing. Beginning with such elementary concepts as depth, he progresses logically through shading, reflections, and multiple vanishing points.

Overview

Using easy-to-follow, step-by-step sketches, DuBosque introduces readers to the techniques of three-dimensional drawing. Beginning with such elementary concepts as depth, he progresses logically through shading, reflections, and multiple vanishing points.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Jane Van Wiemokly
Hart's How to Draw titles are part of a series that includes his How to Draw Comic Book Heroes and Villains (Watson-Guptill, 1995). They begin with the basics: how to draw heads and bodies. Hart continues in Dogs by showing different types and breeds, anatomy, and variations from reality. Bad Guys is essentially the same corresponding material, except that we get different bad types of men and women rather than dogs, including mutant and otherworld villains. These are not for beginners, but for those who already have some knowledge of drawing and ability. Bad Guys comes across as more sophisticated, geared for older teens, partly attributable to the subject matter. Boldly colored illustrations combined with the line drawings add to the professional look of the books, from which readers can get some ideas for drawing their own villains. Draw 3-D is a gem of a book. While Hart's books are better for eliciting ideas than giving exact how-to instructions, DuBosque takes readers step-by-step to teach perspective drawing. He assumes the reader has no knowledge of how to achieve 3-D drawings, so he uses clear, concise directions that are complemented by his illustrations. Anyone who wants to (forgive the pun) "add depth" to their artwork, but does not know how to accomplish it, would find this an effective source for learning linear perspective. DuBosque has done other books in this series on specific subjects such as Draw Ocean Animals, Draw Insects, Draw Cars, and Learn to Draw Now!, among others. Note: This review was written and published to address Draw 3-D: A Step-by-Step Guide to Perspective Drawing, How to Draw Cartoon Dogs, Puppies & Wolves, and How to Draw Comic Book Bad Guys and Gals. VOYA Codes: 4Q 2P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 1999, Peel Productions, Inc., P.O. Box 546, Columbus, NC
School Library Journal
Gr 4 Up-Using easy-to-follow, step-by-step sketches, DuBosque introduces readers to the techniques of three-dimensional drawing. Beginning with such elementary concepts as depth, he progresses logically through shading, reflections, and multiple vanishing points. The supportive tone encourages novices to keep trying and not become discouraged. The drawings of what can go wrong and how to correct these errors are particularly helpful. Sure to be popular with budding artists of all ages, this is a good choice for any collection.-Michele Snyder, Chappaqua Public Library, NY Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780939217144
Publisher:
Peel Productions
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Series:
Learn to Draw Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
173,265
Product dimensions:
8.45(w) x 10.95(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
11 - 14 Years

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Draw 3-D 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MadameKiki More than 1 year ago
Tis paper back book is the best way of undrtanding what happens to line and form in spcae that I have come across. For beginning artists of any age, or reviewing the principal of space and perspective, it offers some easy lessons and goes way beyond. As a long time art teacher and a practicing artist with grandchildren I have been looking for a book of this size and type. They are hard to come by. I have seen many art enthusists ruin a nice work by messing up simple shapes. You either train your eye to see what is really thereor remain an amateur. CCoit