Draw!

Draw!

5.0 2
by Raul Colon, Raúl Colón
     
 

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Based on his own childhood, beloved and award-winning artist Raúl Colón’s wordless book is about the limitless nature of creativity and imagination.

A boy alone in his room.
Pencils.
Sketchbook in hand.
What would it be like to on safari?
Imagine.
Draw…

A boy named Leonardo begins to imagine and then draw a world…  See more details below

Overview

Based on his own childhood, beloved and award-winning artist Raúl Colón’s wordless book is about the limitless nature of creativity and imagination.

A boy alone in his room.
Pencils.
Sketchbook in hand.
What would it be like to on safari?
Imagine.
Draw…

A boy named Leonardo begins to imagine and then draw a world afar—first a rhinoceros, and then he meets some monkeys, and he always has a friendly elephant at his side. Soon he finds himself in the jungle and carried away by the sheer power of his imagination, seeing the world throuhg his own eyes and making friends along the way.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
★ 06/01/2014
PreS-Gr 3—Using watercolor and colored pencils, Colón has created a wordless book (based on his childhood) that speaks volumes. A boy, home for the day perhaps because of an illness, sits on his bed reading a book about Africa. He begins to draw. Five identical, intensely colored pictures of the boy with an easel, art supplies, and a pit helmet increase in size as readers begin this richly imagined day on a safari. He draws an elephant as an egret watches, and atop the elephant's back, the boy and bird find a herd of zebras. They pose for him as he sits on a stump. Giraffes thunder by, raising clouds of golden dust. The boy draws them, his body aslant as his eyes follow them. He draws a gorilla, who holds his helmet and shares his sandwich. He draws lions, a water buffalo, and a hippo before sighting a charging rhinoceros. Running with all his might, he barely escapes the rhino. Baboons retrieve his pencils, set up his easel, and draw him. They also eat his sandwiches as the day slides into evening. A spread poignantly captures the parting of boy and elephant. Eyes closed, he lays his head against his friend's side while the elephant's trunk gently caresses the boy's cheek. As six identical paintings decrease in size, the book returns to the boy's pale room, now strewn with drawings. The final scene shows the boy at school, holding the elephant's picture front and center. The pleasure the boy takes in making and sharing his art is palpable. Young artists will love this book, as will all children who know the joy of exploring their own imaginations. A must-have for every library.—Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442494930
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
Publication date:
09/16/2014
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
40
File size:
14 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Raúl Colón has illustrated several highly acclaimed picture books, including Draw!; the New York Times bestselling Angela and the Baby Jesus by Frank McCourt; Susanna Reich’s José! Born to Dance; and Jill Biden’s Don’t Forget, God Bless Our Troops. Mr. Colón lived in Puerto Rico as a young boy and now resides in New City, New York, with his family.

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Draw! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ChemersGallery More than 1 year ago
We absolutely love Raul Colon. Every book gets better and better! This is the first book he has completed from concept to finished work all 100% Raul and it is so very clever. As an art gallery, we focus on his illustrations and were so delighted to see this new work. The story is beautifully and humorously told just through pictures. Without words the storyline rings clear!
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
Nothing to read here just look at the illustrations and the story just comes alive. Imagine going on a safari without ever leaving your room. With paper, pencils and gigantic book of Africa within your grasp you are transported into the jungle to create your own adventure. With a canteen slung over his shoulder and a backpack stuffed full of sandwiches, this boy befriends an elephant who stands patiently as the boy sets off to draw his first African animal still-life. Riding high on the elephant, seeing the landscape spread out before him, he spies zebras, giraffes, lions, gorillas, and rhinos, just some of the animals on his African journey. With his supplies at his side, he’s ready to draw. It’s quite an adventure for such a young lad, hanging from trees, running from wild beasts, and I’m glad he’s brought enough sandwiches as the animals are hungry as they sit while he draws. His journey is almost over and it’s something he’ll always remember. The pictures he drew? He’s got a special place to take them and I think he might even have a story to tell but any words you want to include, go ahead….I don’t think he would mind. There was something about the illustrations, the peacefulness of the animals as they stood to be drawn. The lightening of the African sun and these pictures had a brush stroke feature, a wave line throughout them that was unique; I really enjoyed that on the animals and on the trees. The animals did look life-like and that is a real plus.