Drawing Animals Made Amazingly Easy [NOOK Book]

Overview

Christopher Hart, America’s best-selling author of art instruction books, tosses all that aside to make drawing animals truly amazingly easy, by simplifying animal anatomy so that artists can get the poses they really want. What does that animal look like as it moves, bends, twists, jumps, runs? Simplified skeletons and an innovative new approach show how to look at an animal as a strangely built human with an odd posture--allowing the artist to draw animals by identifying with them. Hart’s step-by-step ...
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Drawing Animals Made Amazingly Easy

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Overview

Christopher Hart, America’s best-selling author of art instruction books, tosses all that aside to make drawing animals truly amazingly easy, by simplifying animal anatomy so that artists can get the poses they really want. What does that animal look like as it moves, bends, twists, jumps, runs? Simplified skeletons and an innovative new approach show how to look at an animal as a strangely built human with an odd posture--allowing the artist to draw animals by identifying with them. Hart’s step-by-step instructions and clear text mean true-to-life results every time, whether the subjects are dogs, cats, horses, deer, lions, tigers, elephants, monkeys, bears, birds, pigs, goats, giraffes, or kangaroos.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Hart, one of the world's best-selling authors of drawing and cartooning books, takes an unusual approach in this title for young students. To become comfortable with animal anatomy, he offers a simple solution: "You look for the similarities…between animal and human skeletons. Think of an animal as a strangely built human." For novices who may not have mastered the depiction of humans, this may not be much comfort. That said, Hart does provide adequate training in making simple drawings of dogs, cats, horses, deer, bears, lions, and elephants. Libraries on the whole, however, will be better served by self-taught artist Kaaren Poole's detailed and vivid How To Sketch Animals.


—Daniel Lombardo
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780770434717
  • Publisher: Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
  • Publication date: 7/24/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 694,788
  • File size: 22 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Christopher Hart
CHRISTOPHER HART is the world's bestselling author of drawing and cartooning books. His books have sold more than 6 million copies and have been translated into 20 languages. Renowned for up-to-the-minute content and easy-to-follow steps, all of Hart's books have become staples for a new generation of aspiring artists and professionals, and they have been selected by the American Library Association for special notice.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Read an Excerpt

Believe it or not, but animals do not walk on the soles of their feet! They only walk on their toes. Let's go in for a close-up of this concept.

When relaxed, a dog's paws are always floppy. That's one of the main distinctions i've noticed between animals and humans: Humans use their hands in a very precise manner, whereas animals use their "hands" in a loose and imprecise way.
The idea of relaxed front and rear paws is especially important when dogs-- or any other animals with similar "hands" and "feet"-- walk. Take a look at the Great Dane to the right. This relaxed-paw quality is something that animators use and know well. It's a principle known as drag, and you can see it if you watch any wildlife special on TV. When animals walk, the paws drag behind in a floppy, relaxed manner. This is very different from the way humans walk. Yes, the joints in human hands are often loose during walking, but they never "drag" behind to quite the extent that you see on animals. 
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Table of Contents


Introduction
Dogs     8
Seeing Animals as Humans     10
The Dog Head     12
Areas of Fur on the Head     18
"Smiles" and Barks     19
Simplified Body Structure     20
Standing     24
Sitting     26
Playful Pose     28
Curling Up     30
Running     31
Other Body Types     32
Hands and Paws     34
Feet and Paws     36
Conveying Volume     38
Overlapping Lines     39
Perspective     40
The Effect of Gravity     41
The Wolf     42
Cats     44
The Head     46
The "Sleeping" Eye     51
Rendering Facial Details     52
Standing     54
Sitting     56
Other Cat Postures     60
Horses     62
The Head     64
Simplified Anatomy     70
Body Contours     71
Neck and Chest Muscles     72
The Legs     74
Walking     76
Galloping     78
Deer     80
The Head     82
The Curve of the Neck     88
Varying the Head Placement     89
Simplified Body Structure     90
Alertness     92
Leaping     93
Running     94
Bears     96
The Head     98
The Body     104
Walking     106
Alternate Body Construction: the Three-Circle Method     108
"Standing"     109
Bear Types     110
Lions     112
The Lioness Head     114
Simplified Anatomy     120
Details of the Walk     122
Running     124
The Mane     125
Elephants     126
African Elephants vs. Asian Elephants     128
The Head in Profile     130
The Body in Profile     132
The Body Head-On     134
The Body in 3/4 View     136
The Baby Elephant     138
Other Animals     140
Chimpanzee     142
Bald Eagle     146
Penguin     150
Pig     152
Goat     154
Kangaroo      156
Giraffe     158
Index     160
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2013

    It is amazing it tells you so much on how to draw

    I love it alot because of all the detail put into the pictures

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2014

    Alright, I'm going to be brutally honest here. This is coming fr

    Alright, I'm going to be brutally honest here.
    This is coming from an artist BTW.
    The author has no clue how anatomy works, and I pity anyone who takes his advice.
    Just looking at the cover I can point out several glaringly obvious mistakes.
    Why are the front legs so thin? Why is one of the hooves backwards? Why is the tail coming out of the horses butthole? And several more.
    I absolutely do not recommend this book if you're trying to draw seriously.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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