Drawing Cutting Edge Manga Fusion: How to Draw American Comics with a Manga Influence

Drawing Cutting Edge Manga Fusion: How to Draw American Comics with a Manga Influence

by Christopher Hart
     
 

American comics once dominated the world. Now the balance of power is changing, as anime (Japanese animation) and manga (Japanese comics) have exploded into the mainstream of American culture. Drawing Cutting Edge Fusion is the first-ever tutorial that shows how to draw American-style comics with a manga influence. With this book, artists learn to assimilate

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Overview

American comics once dominated the world. Now the balance of power is changing, as anime (Japanese animation) and manga (Japanese comics) have exploded into the mainstream of American culture. Drawing Cutting Edge Fusion is the first-ever tutorial that shows how to draw American-style comics with a manga influence. With this book, artists learn to assimilate Japanese aesthetics into new-look comics: how to turn supermuscular bodies leaner and more athletic; how to make facial features more angular and elegant; how to draw hair in up-to-the-minute spiked or long styles. This dynamic fusion of cultures brings together exciting storytelling and sophisticated design. Now artists can capture the best of East and West with Drawing Cutting Edge Fusion.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Manga Mania Bishoujo serves as a fine primer for anyone who does not quite "get" manga. Showing how to draw the pretty manga girls known as bishoujo, the book includes a fine explanation of how line is used to indicate emotion through body language and facial features. A kind of visual literacy is required to understand manga and looking at the format from a creationist perspective allows deconstruction as well, giving the casual reader a deeper understanding of the format and its genres. Although Bishoujo focuses exclusively on the female form, the illustrations are more flirtatiously captivating than provocatively sexy. In Drawing Cutting Edge: Fusion, Hart examines the new breed of American independent and traditional superhero comics that borrow from the manga style to create hybrid characters with the bigger eyes, fluid hair, angular faces, and active poses popularized in Japanese comics. Juxtaposed images demonstrate the subtle changes that improve composition of a scene or define a character or action to further the plot. Both books employ a "just three steps" drawing technique: First a basic and simple blueprint using geometric shapes and proportion; second, lines to connect and smooth; and third, details to finish the drawing. Hart gives general tips that the budding artist can apply to any type of figure drawing, then specifics for the genre. Bishoujo offers color suggestions, whereas Fusion has more full-color pages. Special attention is given to the eyes, mouth, and hair in Bishoujo, while hands and silhouettes are featured in Fusion, which also stresses anatomy and muscle movement, whereas angles and perspective are featured inBishoujo. Comic book archetypes such as the ingTnue (schoolgirl), villain, and seductress are highlighted. Fusion pays attention to aging characters, but neither book covers ethnicity or body types other than physically fit. Each volume concludes with a showcase on fantastic characters and special effects, and a one-page index. These are complementary volumes, sure to be popular with young artists. If a library's budget only allows for the purchase of one, keep in mind that manga accounts for more book sales than traditional comics, and Bishoujo will be the more popular choice in most libraries. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P M J S (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2005, Watson-Guptil, 144p.; Index. Illus., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—Beth Gallaway
Children's Literature
Manga, or Japanese comic book art, has had a tremendous influence on the genre all over the world. Fusion is a combination of the best of manga and the best of mainstream American comic book style. The bold power of American comics is merged with the elegance and grace of Japanese comics. Christopher Hart has many, many drawing books to his credit. As always, his objective in each is to provide the budding artist with a complete drawing course. Comic book figures are introduced with a series of line drawings that build the character from ground zero. Seven steps are required to build the head of a fusion man. An inset includes special instructions for the critical eyes, nose, and mouth. These heads are very intense and exude emotion. Once the head has been mastered, it is on to the whole body. As in most drawing programs, objects are developed with simples geometric shapes that are gradually refined. In the fusion style both men and women are very muscular. The next step after mastering the body is to draw the body from a number of different angles and with a variety of different costumes. In addition to instructions for drawing the characters, there is also instruction on how to design the comic book panels for dramatic impact. 2005, Watson-Guptill Publications, Ages 8 to Adult.
—Kristin Harris

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823001606
Publisher:
Ten Speed Press
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

CHRISTOPHER HART is the world's bestselling author of drawing and cartooning books. His books have sold more than 6 million copies and have been translated into 20 languages. Renowned for up-to-the-minute content and easy-to-follow steps, all of Hart's books have become staples for a new generation of aspiring artists and professionals, and they have been selected by the American Library Association for special notice.

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