×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Drawing: Mastering the Language of Visual Expression
     

Drawing: Mastering the Language of Visual Expression

by Keith Micklewright
 
Drawing is a language, a necessary skill for anyone who wants to express ideas or feelings in written images. Like all languages, it can be mastered with practice and instruction. Author Keith Micklewright distills a lifetime of hard thinking about drawing, presenting techniques-along with exercises-that help us become fluent at visual communication. The advantage of

Overview

Drawing is a language, a necessary skill for anyone who wants to express ideas or feelings in written images. Like all languages, it can be mastered with practice and instruction. Author Keith Micklewright distills a lifetime of hard thinking about drawing, presenting techniques-along with exercises-that help us become fluent at visual communication. The advantage of his approach is that drawing is seen as a flexible form of expression rather than a set of mechanical skills. There is no right way to draw creatively, anymore than there is one style of writing creatively. To drive this point home, Micklewright illustrates the book with marvelous drawings by great artists, from Old Masters to the present, that range from precise portraiture to ecstatic nature studies. There is no other book on the subject that combines such a deep, lucid text with such a generous collection of inspirational art.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
To Micklewright, drawing is a language that can be learned with much practice. He compares drawing with writing: Both are visual expressions, both can be learned through instruction, and both have certain techniques that can enhance the presentation to convey what is intended. Using examples of master artists such as Ingres and Michelangelo as well as more contemporary work of Cezanne, Hockney, and others, different aspects of drawing are examined. Each chapter ends with "Ideas to Explore," in which the reader is given suggestions for practice. For example, in the chapter discussing the origins of drawing, the suggested exercise is to analyze two or three masters' drawings. For the Light and Tonal Value chapter, ideas to explore recommend making three drawings: One each using the tonal value of color, one of form, and one of light. Proportion, different materials, time, visual relationships, and more are discussed. This book combines theoretical as well as practical instruction. Micklewright advances the skills of which all artists should be aware, even if not consciously used in their work. For complete information about the well-chosen illustrations of art used in the text (date, size, medium, location), the reader must flip to the back. Further reading lists no book after 2002. Some words in the glossary are not in the index-frustrating if one wants to read further. Aside from these minor annoyances, this book is valuable for those learning the theory behind the elements of drawing and for those looking for practical instruction. VOYA CODES: 3Q 2P S A/YA (Readable without serious defects; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12;Adult-marketed book recommended for Young Adults). 2005., Abrams, 168p.; Glossary. Index. Illus. Photos. Further Reading., Trade pb. Ages 15 to Adult.
—Jane Van Wiemokly
Library Journal - Library Journal
Practicing artist Micklewright (former head, foundation studies, Arts Inst., Bournemouth, U.K.) has created a guide on the importance of drawing illustrated with the work of everyone from Vincent Van Gogh to Pablo Picasso to Frank Auerbach (and Micklewright himself). After an overview of the history of drawing and the obligatory contemplations on what constitutes "fine" drawing, he proceeds to lay the groundwork for exploring the craft. Chapters on proportion, light, dimension, visual relationships, materials, movement, and more are concluded with an "Ideas To Explore" page for further pursuit by the reader. Micklewright wisely emphasizes that drawing is a bit like research for the artist; or, as Saul Steinberg said so eloquently, "a way of reasoning on paper." Another analogy he offers is the idea of drawing as a "language." Through language, he muses, humans bring life to their thoughts, and so it is with drawing. The numerous drawings that accompany the text help support his arguments. Recommended as a starter text for high school libraries and libraries specializing in plastic arts.-Nadine Dalton Speidel, Cuyahoga Cty. P.L., Parma, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810992382
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Series:
Abrams Studio Series
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews