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Drawing the Living Figure [NOOK Book]

Overview


This innovative approach focuses upon the specifics of surface anatomy. 177 of Sheppard's drawings show many different live models in front, back, and side views, and in various standing, sitting, kneeling, crouching, reclining, and twisting poses. Each drawing is accompanied by two diagrams, one for bones, one for muscles.
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Drawing the Living Figure

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Overview


This innovative approach focuses upon the specifics of surface anatomy. 177 of Sheppard's drawings show many different live models in front, back, and side views, and in various standing, sitting, kneeling, crouching, reclining, and twisting poses. Each drawing is accompanied by two diagrams, one for bones, one for muscles.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486129891
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 12/19/2012
  • Series: Dover Anatomy for Artists
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 659,029
  • File size: 41 MB
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DRAWING the LIVING FIGURE


By JOSEPH SHEPPARD

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1984 Watson-Guptill Publications
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-12989-1



CHAPTER 1

REVIEW of ANATOMY


SURFACE ANATOMY

Muscles of skull are thin; bone is close to surface. Skull creates shapes of (A) forehead, (B) cheek, (C) jaw. (D) Eye is egg-shaped, sits in eye socket. (E) Clavicles start at head of (F) sternum, rising upward and back toward outside of shoulder. Note direction of first five ribs attached to sternum: first rib goes upward; second moves straight across; others point downward. (G) End of sternum protrudes. (H) Cavity of rib cage forms arch. (I) Lower ribs slant down from back to front. Pelvis holds stomach like basin. (J) Pelvic crest is prominent. (K) Hipbone is close to skin, clearly seen on male. Note oval shape of (L) kneecap. Silhouette of knee is created by (M) end of femur, (N) head of tibia. (O) Head of fibula creates bump. Ankle is formed by (P) end of tibia, (Q) end of fibula, making hinge joint for foot.


BONES

(1) Skull. (2) Clavicle. (3) Sternum. (4) Rib cage. First seven ribs attach by cartilage to sternum. Each of next three ribs attaches by cartilage to rib above. Eleventh, twelfth ribs do not attach to sternum and are called "floating ribs." (5) Scapula. (6) Humerus. (7) Radius. (8) Ulna. (9) Wrist. Eight bones of wrist are treated here as one unit. (10) Spinal column is treated here as column of simple discs. (11) Pelvis. (12) Femur. (13) Kneecap. (14) Tibia. (15) Fibula attaches to rear of tibia head, intersecting tibia at ankle and descending further, thus making outside of ankle lower than inside. (16) Bones of foot.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Sternomastoid muscles create "V" shape. (B) Trapezius creates shoulder silhouette. (C) Pectoralis and deltoid meet to form cavity between them. (D) Note division of deltoid. (E) Pectoralis inserts into arm under deltoid. (F) Rectus abdominis is divided. (G) Long supinator and (H) wrist extensor both cross over from outside of elbow to thumb side of wrist. (I) External oblique inserts into top of pelvic crest. (J) Tendons of finger extensor are distinct. (K) Tensor fasciae latae angles toward outer contour. (L) See upside-down "V" where (M) sartorius and tensor fasciae latae overlap (N) rectus femoris. When knee is locked, (O) band of Richer pulls muscles in. (P) Gastrocnemius and (Q) soleus are calf muscles that attach in back of leg; they are seen from front. (R) Tendon of big toe extensor is prominent.


MUSCLES

(1) Stermomastoid. (2) Trapezius originates in back, inserts on top outside area of clavicle. (3) Pectoralis. (4) Deltoid. (5) Brachialis. (6) External head of triceps (one of three heads of triceps muscle). (7) Long supinator (turns forearm, palm out). (8, 9, 10) Extensors of wrist. (11) Abductor of thumb (pulls thumb toward back of hand). (12, 13) Extensors of thumb. (14) Extensor of fingers. (15) Biceps. (16) Rectus abdominis. (17) External oblique. (18) Tensor fasciae latae. (19) Sartorius. (20) Abductors. Several muscles are treated here as one unit. (21) Rectus femoris. (22) Vastus. Two parts are treated as one large muscle under rectus femoris. (23) Band of Richer changes shape of thigh when knee is locked. (Many bands that hold muscles in place are omitted). (24) Long peroneus. (25) Long extensor of toes. (26) Tibialis anterior. (27) Extensor of big toe. (28) Gastrocnemius. (29) Soleus. (30) Long flexor of toes. (31) Inside calf muscle mass is lower than outside mass.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Jawbone determines contour of face. (B) Note slant of clavicle. (C) Sternum shows rib attachments. (D) Cavity of ribcage is narrower on female than on male. (E) Lower ribs are evident. (F) Female pelvis is wider than male. (G) Crest of pelvis is partly covered by body fat. (H) Hipbone is close to skin, creating cavity on hip surface of females and fat males. (I) Kneecap and fat below form figure "8". (J) Shape of head of tibia slants inward. (K) Inside of ankle is always higher than outside. (L) End of ulna is prominent on little finger side of wrist. (M) Head of ulna forms elbow.


BONES

(1) Skull. (2) Clavicle. (3) Scapula. Clavicle and scapula form shoulder socket for humerus—a ball and socket joint. (4) Sternum. (5) Rib cage. (6) Humerus. (7) Radius is always on outside of elbow and thumb side of wrist. Radius head, at elbow, is small. End of radius, at wrist, is large. (8) Ulna is on inside of elbow. Head is large; end is small. (9) Wrist. (10) Bones of the palm. (11) Spinal column. (12) Pelvis. Female pelvis is usually wider than male with crests projecting farther forward. (13) Femur. (14) Kneecap. (15) Tibia. (16) Fibula. Inside of ankle is always higher than outside. (17) Bones of foot.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Deltoid attaches to clavicle. (B) Pectoralis lies beneath (C) breast. (D) Vertical division of rectus abdominis is distinct—except on extremely fat figures. (E) External oblique and female body fat cover most of pelvic crest. (F) Sartorius helps to form (G) upside down "V" shaped cavity. (H) Tendon of thumb extensor makes sharp ridge. (I) Female body fat covers hipbone. (J) Indentation is formed by sartorius. (K) Outside of vastus is prominent when knee is locked. (L) Iliotibial band descends outside of thigh like stripe, attaches to outside of tibia head. (M) Small fat deposit appears under kneecap. (N) Calf muscles attach to heel bone by (O) Achilles tendon. (P) Tibialis anterior tendon makes bridge between ankle and foot. (Q) Tendon of toe extensor is prominent.


MUSCLES

(1) Sternomastoid. (2) Deltoid. (3) Pectoralis attaches along sternum and clavicle. (4) Biceps. (5) Brachialis. (6) Rectus abdominis. (7) External oblique. (8) Group of thumb muscles. Three muscles run obliquely across back of forearm into thumb. (9) Rectus femoris. (10) Vastus (inside part). (11) Tensor fasciae latae. (12) Gluteus. (13) Sartorius descends across front of thigh into inside head of tibia. (14) Vastus (outside part). (15) Iliotibial band. (16) Biceps femoris (biceps of leg). (17) Long extensor of toes. (18) Long peroneus. (19) Gastrocnemius. (20) Soleus. (21) Peroneus tertius. (22) Tibialis anterior. (23) Extensor of big toe.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) First four vertebrae of ribcage are distinct. (B) Note slight "step down" where head of scapula joins end of clavicle. (C) Edge of scapula protrudes. (D) Lower end of scapula swings upward and outward when arm is raised. (E) Knuckles appear where palm bones join finger bones. (F) Wrist forms flat area between hand and forearm. (G) Radius is longer than (H) ulna at wrist. (I) Hook of ulna and (J) head of radius are prominent. (K) Dimples are caused by pelvic crests. (L) Hipbone is close to surface. (M) Head of fibula creates bump. (N) Heel is off-center—toward little-toe side. (O) Inside end of humerus is always prominent.


BONES

(1) Spinal column is made up of twenty-four vertebrae, divided into three groups: seven cervical vertebrae of neck support skull and are most flexible (partly covered here by hand); twelve dorsal vertebrae of rib cage; five lumbar vertebrae of lower back, which are largest. (2) Scapula. (3) Clavicle. (4) Humerus. Head of humerus is round like ball. (5) Ulna. (6) Radius. (7) Wrist. (8) Pelvis. Both sides of pelvis contain sockets to fit heads of femurs. These are ball-and-socket joints that enable femur to rotate freely in all directions. (9) Femur. Upper part of femur protrudes, forms hipbone, always appears next to skin. (10) Tibia. (11) Fibula. (12) Bones of foot. Movements of foot on ankle are more limited than those of hand on wrist. Major foot movement is hingelike.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Trapezius attaches to base of skull, forming (B) line of shoulders. (C) Long head of triceps splits between (D) infraspinatus and (E) teres major. Shoulder blade muscles (D and E) insert into arm. (F) Latissimus dorsi forms back wall of armpit, inserts into the arm with (E) teres major. (G) Edge of trapezius shows thickness of muscle. (H) Long head of triceps inserts between scapula muscles. (I) Long supinator makes outside of forearm higher than inside. (J) Tendon of wrist flexor stands out. (K) Sacrospinalis creates two columns in small of back. (L) Gluteus is shaped like butterfly wings. (M) Biceps femoris tendon, (N) semitendinosus tendon, and (O) crease in back of knee create "H" shape. (P) Gastrocnemius has two heads. (Q) Achilles tendon attaches gastrocnemius to heel.


MUSCLES

(1) Sternomastoid attaches to base of skull behind ear. (2) Trapezius. (3) Infraspinatus. (4) Teres minor. (5) Deltoid. (6) Teres major. (7) Three heads of triceps. (8) Long supinator. (9) Extensors. (10) Flexor of wrist—little finger side. (11) Flexor of fingers. (12) Flexor of wrist—thumb side. (13) Latissimus dorsi. (14) Sacrospinalis. This group of muscles starts at pelvis, attaches along spinal column. (15) External oblique. (16) Gluteus. (17) Iliotibial band. (18) Vastus. (19) Biceps femoris—two heads. (20) Semitendinosus. (21) Semimembranosus and semitendinosus are treated as one muscle. (22) Gastrocnemius has two heads. Inside head is longer, more prominent. (23) Soleus. (24) Short and long peroneus treated as one muscle.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Edge of scapula is distinct even on soft female figure. (B) Spinal column creates center line. (C) Outside edge of rib cage forms contour of torso. (D) Dimples are created by pelvic crest. Protruding part of (E) left femur (hipbone) forms a cavity. (F) Right femur is pushed out when weight is put on it. When weight is put on either leg, that hip is higher than other. Triangle is formed by (G) outside and (H) inside end of humerus and (I) head of ulna.


BONES

(1) Skull. (2) Spinal column. (3) Scapula. (4) Rib cage. (5) Elbow of straight arm. When forearm is locked in open position, three prominent protuberances of elbow (shown by dots) are in straight line. (6) Elbow of bent arm. When forearm is bent, head of ulna drops. Three prominent protuberances (shown by dots) form triangle. (7) Ulna. (8) Pelvis. (9) Femur. (10) Tibia. (11) Fibula. (12) Bones of foot. Heel is off-center, toward little-toe side.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Sternomastoid contour is evident even in back view. (B) Deltoid is softer on female than male. (C) Latissimus dorsi forms back wall of arm pit. (D) Shoulder muscles attach to scapula, connect to arm. (E) Note division between triceps and biceps. (F) Between sacrospinalis muscles, deep crevice (G) is formed, following spinal column. (H) Dimples appear where crest of pelvis is close to surface. (I) Female body fat is deposited under buttocks. (J) Tendons on back and inside of leg form one mass. (K) Outside of calf is higher than inside. (L) Achilles tendon is thick and rounded. (M) Peroneus muscles create small ridge.


MUSCLES

(1) Deltoid. (2) Triceps. (3) Flexor of wrist—little finger side. (4) Flexor of fingers. (5) Flexor of wrist—thumb side. All three flexors are generally treated as one group. (6) Biceps. (7) Trapezius. (8) Latissimus dorsi. (9) External oblique. (10) Sacrospinalis. (11) Gluteus. (12) Iliotibial band. (13) Gastrocnemius. (14) Peroneus. (15) Biceps femoris. (16) Semitendinosus. (17) Adductor group. (18) Sartorius. (19) Soleus. (20) Flexor of toes.


SURFACE ANATOMY

Skull dictates shape of cheeks, jaw. (A) Two bones of "Adam's apple" are suspended, held in place by muscle. They are more obvious in male than female. (B) Clavicle slants back from (C) sternum, and up toward shoulder. (D) Ribs slant down from rear to front. (E) Rib cage determines shape of upper torso. (F) Head of ulna forms hook over end of humerus. (G) Outside end of humerus is shaped like small ball on which (H) head of radius rotates. (I) Thumb has only two bones. (J) Pelvic crest is obvious on male figure. (K) Head of fibula attaches to back of tibia. (L) Kneecap is oval. (M) Pads on outside of foot make flat form.


BONES

(1) Skull is made up of two distinct pieces: back of head; upper part of face and jaw. (2) Adam's apple—two small bones. (3) Spinal column. (4) Rib cage. Twelve pairs of ribs attach to twelve vertebrae of rib cage in back. They swing obliquely downward to front. (5) Pelvis. Crest of pelvis is next to skin, showing clearly on men, most women. (6) Femur. (7) Kneecap. (8) Tibia. (9) Fibula. (10) Bones of foot. Big toe has one less bone than other toes, is often shorter than second toe.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Infraspinatus and (B) teres major are split by (C) long head of triceps as they insert into arm. (D) Short head of triceps is flexed when arm is held out. (E) Flexors on palm side and (F) extensors for back of hand are divided by (G) ulna. (H) Tendon of wrist flexor creates small ridge when fingers are raised. (I) Latissimus dorsi covers (J) top of serratus muscles. Serratus intersect with (K) external oblique attachments like interlocked fingers. (L) Gastrocnemius head inserts into leg behind (M) group of tendons on inside of leg. (N) Iliotibial band and (O) tendon of biceps femoris form two straps on outside of knee. (P) Long peroneus creates sharp ridge. (Q) Tendons form bridge at ankle between leg and foot. (R) Tendons of toe extensors are evident when toes are extended.


MUSCLES

(1) Sternomastoid. (2) Trapezius. (3) Infraspinatus. (4) Teres major. (5) Latissimus dorsi. (6) Deltoid. (7) Brachialis. (8) Biceps. (9) Long supinator. (10) Extensors of wrist and fingers. (11) Triceps. (12) Flexor of wrist. (13) Flexor of fingers. (14) Serratus attach to first nine ribs, insert into underside of scapula. (15) Rectus abdominis. (16) External oblique. (17) Gluteus. (18) Iliotibial band. (19) Rectus femoris. (20) Vastus. (21) Band of Richer. (22) Biceps femoris. (23) Adductor group. (24) Semitendinosus. (25) Sartorius. (26) Gastrocnemius. (27) Soleus. (28) Long peroneus. (29) Extensor of toes. (30) Tibialis anterior. (31) Flexor of toes.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Clavicle starts at pit of neck. (B) Observe swelling shape of rib cage. (C) Head of ulna forms hook at elbow. (D) Entire length of ulna shows. (E) End of ulna is most prominent bone at wrist. (F) Pelvic crest is covered by flesh, but is slightly visible where it ends— typical on females. (G) Kneecap sits in front of end of femur. (H) Head of fibula attaches to outside and back of tibia head. (I) Inside of foot has high arch. (J) Second toe is often longer than big toe. (K) Note arch on big toe inside of foot.


BONES

(1) Skull. (2) Spinal column. (3) Humerus. (4) Radius. (5) Ulna. When palm is turned inward radius rotates around ulna, crossing obliquely down from outside of elbow to inside (thumb side) of wrist. (6) Wrist bones. (7) Bones of palm—five. (8) Bones of fingers. Each finger has three bones, except thumb, which has two. (9) Pelvis. (10) Femur. (11) Kneecap. (12) Tibia. (13) Fibula. (14) Bones of foot. Two important arches are formed, serving as springs, absorbing much of body weight. One arch (A) from heel to toe, is more evident on inside of the foot. Other arch (B) runs from side to side; big-toe side is highest point of arch.


SURFACE ANATOMY

(A) Sternomastoid drops diagonally down from behind ear to head of sternum. (B) Deltoid form appears in front of clavicle. (C) Pectoralis muscles form front wall of armpit. (D) External oblique is full and round. (E) Long supinator makes top of forearm fuller than underside. (F) Sartorius creates break in outline of thigh. (G) Vastus produces fullness of thigh. (H) Iliotibial band connects to head of tibia. (I) Tendon of toe extensor and (J) tibialis anterior create bridge. (K) Tendons of toe extensor are evident. (L) Body fat covers tendons on inside of leg. (M) Note space between (N) Achilles tendon and (O) flexor of toes.


MUSCLES

(1) Sternomastoid. (2) Deltoid. (3) Brachialis. (4) Triceps. (5) Biceps. (6) Long supinator. (7) Extensors. (8) Pectoralis. (9) Serratus. (10) External oblique. (11) Gluteus. (12) Biceps femoris. (13) Iliotibial band. (14) Sartorius. (15) Vastus. (16) Rectus femoris. (17) Gastrocnemius. (18) Long peroneus. (19) Extensor of toes. (20) Tibialis anterior. (21) Soleus. (22) Peroneus tertius. (23) Rectus abdominis. (24) Adductor group. (25) Semitendinosus. (26) Flexor of toes.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from DRAWING the LIVING FIGURE by JOSEPH SHEPPARD. Copyright © 1984 Watson-Guptill Publications. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER ONE. REVIEW OF ANATOMY
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
CHAPTER TWO. STANDING FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
CHAPTER THREE. SEATED FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
CHAPTER FOUR. KNEELING FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
CHAPTER FIVE. CROUCHING FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
CHAPTER SIX. RECLINING FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, FACE UP"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FACE UP"
"MALE FIGURE, FACE DOWN"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FACE DOWN"
CHAPTER SEVEN. TWISTING FIGURE
"MALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, FRONT VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, BACK VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW"
"MALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
"FEMALE FIGURE, SIDE VIEW"
SUGGESTED READING
INDEX
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