Dreads

( 22 )

Overview

I couldn't imagine those black ropes on their heads were hair...natural hair to which nothing was added, not even a brushing...I wondered what such hair felt like, smelled like. What a person dreamed about at night, with hair like that spreading across the pillow...

—from the introduction by Alice Walker

"Beautiful book, beautiful hair, beautiful people, beautiful exhilarating spirituality. I loved it and love my (our) hair." —Anne Lamott author of Traveling Mercies

"Dreads is ...

See more details below
Paperback
$15.54
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$21.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Sending request ...

Overview

I couldn't imagine those black ropes on their heads were hair...natural hair to which nothing was added, not even a brushing...I wondered what such hair felt like, smelled like. What a person dreamed about at night, with hair like that spreading across the pillow...

—from the introduction by Alice Walker

"Beautiful book, beautiful hair, beautiful people, beautiful exhilarating spirituality. I loved it and love my (our) hair." —Anne Lamott author of Traveling Mercies

"Dreads is an exquisite artistic testament to the individuality of the men and women who make dreads not only a look but a way of life. These cross-cultural images demonstrate that the human visage is the first artistic canvas we have access to."—Farai Chideya author of The Color of Our Future

"There is always the question of whether you grow locks or your locks grow you. This book shows dreadlocks that are funky, elegant, sexy, dramatic, spiritual—and always beautiful. It makes me very happy to be nappy."—Veronica Chambers author of Mama's Girl

Photographed on location in Jamaica, Japan, New Zealand, Kenya, Namibia, Ethiopia, Angola, Senegal, India, and the United States

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
YA-This large, coffee-table type book with black-and-white photographs looks at the wide diversity of people who sport this knotted, ropelike hairdo. Some display it theatrically, while others wear it to stress their individuality. Others have religious or political reasons. The author also looks at dreadlocks in history, including the priests of the Ethiopian Coptic Church who have been locking their hair since the fifth century and the Rastafarian movement, which began religiously in Ethiopia. There is an introduction by Alice Walker as well as a 20-page treatise on "Sacred Rites of the Natural Hair Revolution." The 100 plates of men, women, and children in various cultures and at varying levels of modernity show this amazing hairstyle doing its thing in variety and abundance. The hair itself arouses interest and speculation as to the time involved in achieving it, the intricacies of the hygiene, and simply the wonder of it all.-Frances Reiher, Fairfax County Public Library, VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781579651503
  • Publisher: Artisan
  • Publication date: 11/1/1999
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 261,921
  • Product dimensions: 10.31 (w) x 12.06 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

Francesco Mastalia has spent the last twenty-five years mastering the art of the black-and-white photography. Advertising and corporate assignments dominate his career as a portrait photographer, while his commitment to documentary photography has taken him around the world. A native of Italy, he is now based in New York.

Alfonse Pagano turned to photography as an art form in 1994, after a distinguished career as a painter, during which his mixed media and oil works were exhibited in such venues as the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Laguna Gloria Museum of Art. He is the recipient of New York Foundation for the Arts and Change, Inc., grants. Pagano lives in New York.

Alice Walker is a poet and novelist whose work includes The Temple of My Familiar, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and The Color Purple, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983. A longtime advocate of dreadlocks, she did not comb her hair for more than ten years.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Considering the prevalence of dreadlocks today and their twentieth-century Jamaican roots, it's tempting to view them as just another outgrowth of multiculturalism, a blatant badge of membership in the global village. But the current craze for dreadlocks can be deceptive: In fact, the style dates back to the dawn of civilization. India's sadhus and sadhvis—mendicant ascetics of the Hindu faith—have been locking their hair for pre-Christian centuries, from the time when their ancestral warriors fought for royal rulers. Matted locks, or jatta, are considered a divine directive, symbolic of the the covenant between the sadhus and Shiva, the god of destruction and regeneration. Tresses are roped in emulation of the deities: Skanda, depicted with six matted locks—one for each of his faces; Huniyan, marked with five—or three in his demonic incarnation. Jatta announces that its owner adheres to the strict spiritual and sexual practices, including poverty and celibacy, outlined over two thousand years ago in the Naradaparivrajaka Upanished. The Old Testament recounts the tale of Sampson and Delilah, in which a man's potency is directly related to the "seven locks" upon his head. Jesus of Nazareth would have returned from his forty days in the desert with matted hair.

Excerpted from Dreads by Francesco Mastalia. Copyright (c) 1999. Reprinted with permission by Artisan.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Dreads by Alice Walker

Sacred Rites of the Natural Hair Revolution

Portraits

List of Plates

Acknowledgments

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 16, 2013

    This book is....WOW! An eye opener...beautifully done, the photo

    This book is....WOW! An eye opener...beautifully done, the photography is EXCEPTIONAL! I suggest this book to ANYONE/EVERYONE !

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2006

    dreads are for anyone

    This is an excellent book - i love watching people flip through it seeing all the different styles of dreads you can get. Dreads are multi-cultural whether you want to believe it or not - they have been found in cultures the world over for thousands of years - check out egyptian murals, or read the accounts of roman spectators about the 'snake-headed' celts fighting as gladiators, look at pottery of some of the famous germanic gladiators, or chinese paintings of mongol warriors, or many of the indian holy men. some cultures may have forgotten dreads, but most have them in their history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2006

    Very beautiful pictures

    The book gave not just pictures but their reasons for locking. Also locks are very much so a black hairstyle responding to the first comment. Locking is a sacred process, and our hair is meant to lock up naturally with no manipulation. So don't think because you saw a few people in the book who were not black, that locks are not just a 'black' thing, because it is, naturally.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2005

    very pleased

    I was very pleased to see all of the different races and cultures represented in this book. A lot of the time people think of dreads as being a 'black' hairstyle, when actually many different people have them. The pictures are beautiful, and the people are beautiful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2003

    Beautiful and breath taking!

    This book had breautiful pictures in it, and the stories were wonderful. At first I was thinking about getting dreads now I know I want them for sure.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2001

    Breathtaking, But...

    It was great to see and learn of many cultures that dread. I wish it could have went more into other African cultures that dread, like the Dada sect of the Yoruba who make the choice by the natural curl pattern from birth. Dogon holy men in Mali, Gullah people in South Carolina and much more. I guess there wasn't enough room, but there was enough room to have a segment on people who spent hundreds of dollars to have their dreads Chemically curled. As a natural dread that was off the mark. DREAD NO NEED MAHN MADE TINGS!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2000

    Wildflower I. DREAD, Cleve, Oh

    As a 'dread', I found the the book a bit offensive. Sure some of the images are captivating and beautiful but I'm annoyed with white folks imitating and profiting off other cultures.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2000

    On My Coffee Table

    Extremely interesting and magnificently done. Although I was a bit put off, at first, by the show of other races with dreads -- the book did give me a new understanding for why people dread and it taught me a few things. I dread my own hair because I want to -- nothing deep, nothing spiritual. It's the naturalness I'm trying to connect to. The pictures in the book are unusual, interesting and thought provoking. A definite conversation piece -- that's why 'Dreads' has earned the honor of being on my coffee table.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2000

    Phenomenal piece of eye candy, and a welcome plunge into a world many do not understand

    This book is a hommage to the hairstyle that has helped define the beliefs and individuality of thousands of dreadheads around the world. I cannot describe the beauty of locked hair, I myself wear it, and seeing it on others is simply breathtaking!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2000

    It's Deep.

    unity in many words the book is truth on behalf of the times how now in time is a style when in reality is a way of life , hopefully the authors give back to the community they gaving me an eye opening visual of the world nd beliefs is worth buying is deep just like the roots. god bless.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2000

    a visual masterpiece

    a prolific visual experience into the reality we call our's. showing us a world that continues to live on the edge and has no limits or boundaries. breathtaking black and white photography with daringly haunting yet intelligent eye opening views.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2000

    Breathtaking and spiritual!

    This collection of photos and stories is wonderful and enchanting. I've since decided to let my own hair grow into the simple, natural braids. The history of dreads, the philosophy behind them, as well as portrayals of them on all different people from all different backgrounds is moving!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 1999

    Just too many different theories rolled into one book

    To say that I was disappointed is putting it midly. While the authors initially discussed the history of dreads, they eventually included white hippie types and a naked white woman. As a black woman whose locks are apart of her spirituality and self pride, adding these valueless people in the piece was an insult. rendering dreads no more than a cheap fad.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)