Dream and the Nightmare: The Sixties' Legacy to the Underclass

Overview

Myron Magnet's The Dream and the Nightmare argues that the radical transformation of American culture that took place in the 1960s brought today's underclass—overwhelmingly urban, dismayingly minority—into existence. Lifestyle experimentation among the white middle class produced often catastrophic changes in attitudes toward marriage and parenting, the work ethic and dependency in those at the bottom of the social ladder and closed down their exits to the middle class. Texas Governor George W. Bush's ...
See more details below
Paperback (REVISED)
$14.37
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$15.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (38) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $3.98   
  • Used (31) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Myron Magnet's The Dream and the Nightmare argues that the radical transformation of American culture that took place in the 1960s brought today's underclass—overwhelmingly urban, dismayingly minority—into existence. Lifestyle experimentation among the white middle class produced often catastrophic changes in attitudes toward marriage and parenting, the work ethic and dependency in those at the bottom of the social ladder and closed down their exits to the middle class. Texas Governor George W. Bush's presidential campaign recently highlighted the continuing importance of The Dream and the Nightmare when Bush strategist Karl Rove cited this book as a road map to the governor's philosophy of "compassionate conservatism."
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From Publishers Weekly: The legacy of the subtitle, according to Magnet, a Fortune magazine editorial board member and Manhattan Institute for Policy Research analyst, is "a liberal, left-of-central worldview" that, despite the intentions of the 1960s counterculture advocates, divides our society more fully than ever into Haves and Have-Nots. The sexual revolution and the focus on free "expressiveness" had the effect of holding "the poor back from advancement by robbing them of responsibility for their fate and thus further squelching their initiative and energy." The counterculture, as subscribed to by mainstream media, the federal courts and such figures as Ted Kennedy, befuddled the work ethic with idealistic notions of civil rights and fair wages. Finding a poverty of spirit in recent art, such as the fiction of Anne Beattie and Bret Easton Ellis, Magnet urges that we " stop the current welfare system, stop quota-based affirmative action . . . stop letting bums expropriate public spaces . . . stop Afrocentric education in the schools." Magnet offers many examples of societal ills but fails to make a convincing case that the legacy of the counterculture is the culprit. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

“To read Magnet is to realize that the conservative critique of contemporary America is the more-- indeed the only-- radical critique just now.”
– George F. Will

“The book of the decade…the most insightful analysis of what has gone wrong in America during the past thirty years I’ve seen.”
– Mona Charen, syndicated columnist

“It is rare for a single short book to case such penetrating light on the world in which we live that it instantly becomes an indispensable guide to the outstanding question of the day…The Dream and the Nightmare is a work of this extraordinary kind.”
– Hilton Kramer, The New Criterion

“An absorbing tale of how the honorable intentions of liberal do-gooders produced tragic consequences. It is also at heart a profoundly optimistic book…Many writers have addressed this topic in recent years but few have done so with more wisdom or more passion than Mr. Magnet.”
– The Wall Street Journal

“Guaranteed non-PC from beginning to end.”
– Tom Wolfe

“This superbly written and well argued book should stimulate discussions across the breadth of the political spectrum.”
– National Review

“A powerful analysis of the ties between 1960s-era intellectual trends and contemporary urban social breakdown.”
– New York Post

“It is a superb book, thoughtful and impassioned.”
– Irving Kristol

“A masterly overview…that yields extraordinary explanatory power.”
– Carolyn Lochhead, Reason

Wall Street Journal

When asked by the Wall Street Journal to name the book, excepting the Bible, that he has read that has been most important to him, George W. Bush said:

"The Dream and the Nightmare by Myron Magnet crystallized for me the impact the failed culture of the '60s had on our values and society."

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The legacy of the subtitle, according to Magnet, a Fortune magazine editorial board member and Manhattan Institute for Policy Research analyst, is ``a liberal, left-of-central worldview'' that, despite the intentions of the 1960s counterculture advocates, divides our society more fully than ever into Haves and Have-Nots. The sexual revolution and the focus on free ``expressiveness'' had the effect of holding ``the poor back from advancement by robbing them of responsibility for their fate and thus further squelching their initiative and energy.'' The counterculture, as subscribed to by mainstream media, the federal courts and such figures as Ted Kennedy, befuddled the work ethic with idealistic notions of civil rights and fair wages. Finding a poverty of spirit in recent art, such as the fiction of Anne Beattie and Bret Easton Ellis, Magnet urges that we `` stop the current welfare system, stop quota-based affirmative action . . . stop letting bums expropriate public spaces . . . stop Afrocentric education in the schools.'' Magnet offers many examples of societal ills but fails to make a convincing case that the legacy of the counterculture is the culprit. (Mar.)
Booknews
Magnet decries the cultural and political views that absolve individuals of responsibility for their status as members of the underclass. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Internet Bookwatch
History and political science blend in this survey of the 1960s' legacy to modern times. Here Magnet argues that the radical events of the 1960s brought today's underclass and minorities into existence, producing changes in marriage and parenting which often led to dependency and closed doors for the underclass. An eye-opening treatise, The Dream and the Nightmare advocates a return to values honoring work, responsibility and law to help lift the barriers of poverty.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781893554023
  • Publisher: Encounter Books
  • Publication date: 2/28/2000
  • Edition description: REVISED
  • Pages: 238
  • Sales rank: 466,550
  • Lexile: 1420L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 8.47 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author


Myron Magnet is the editor of CITY JOURNAL, the Manhattan Institute's quarterly magazine of urban affairs, and a former member of the board of editors of FORTUNE magazine. His work as a writer has covered a wide range of topics: American society and social policy, economics, corporate management, intellectual history and literature. Married and the father of two teenagers, he lives on Manhattan's Upper West Side.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: What's Gone Wrong? 13
Ch. 1 The Power of Culture 25
Ch. 2 The Underclass 38
Ch. 3 The Hole in the Theory 56
Ch. 4 The Homeless 76
Ch. 5 Homelessness and Liberty 97
Ch. 6 Victimizing the Poor 115
Ch. 7 Race and Reparations 131
Ch. 8 Rebels with a Cause 150
Ch. 9 The Living Constitution 174
Ch. 10 Trashing the Culture 195
Ch. 11 The Poverty of Spirit 220
Notes 229
Index 243
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)