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Dream Country [NOOK Book]

Overview

No one understands the heart of a family better than Luanne Rice. Her luminous novels capture the mystery and miracle of love in all its guises. Now, on the heels of her triumphant New York Times bestseller Cloud Nine, Luanne Rice draws us into the sweeping, unforgettable story of a family's search for hope, faith, and love to bridge the years that have held them apart.

Jewelry maker Daisy Tucker's remarkable talent has earned her a devoted, ...
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Dream Country

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Overview

No one understands the heart of a family better than Luanne Rice. Her luminous novels capture the mystery and miracle of love in all its guises. Now, on the heels of her triumphant New York Times bestseller Cloud Nine, Luanne Rice draws us into the sweeping, unforgettable story of a family's search for hope, faith, and love to bridge the years that have held them apart.

Jewelry maker Daisy Tucker's remarkable talent has earned her a devoted, growing clientele. Her necklaces and bracelets are fashioned of polished stone and delicately etched bone, crafted into pieces inspired by family stories, myths, and Native American lore. But it is not just because of its unique beauty that her jewelry is prized -- word has spread that Daisy's creations bring love into the lives of those who wear them.

Once, years ago, Daisy's work had brought love into her own life. Just out of college, she had traveled to the wilderness of Wyoming's Wind River Mountains in search of inspiration for her art. What she found was rancher James Tucker, a man with the wilderness inside him. Their life together was as close to paradise as a family could get -- until the day their three-year-old son, Jake, disappeared without a trace in the wild country they both had loved. Her heart broken, her marriage in tatters, Daisy returned home to Connecticut with Jake's twin sister, Sage. Wyoming had taken everything from her but her livelihood.

Now, thirteen years later, Wyoming wants more. Sixteen-year-old Sage, whose bedroom walls are covered with posters of the West, is on a dangerous pilgrimage across a vast continent to a father she has longed for but lived without for most of her life. Sage's thirst to see the land and father of her dreams, and learn more about her lost twin, is driving her westward on freight trains and farm roads. Daisy, terrified, flies out to where it all began, to where James Tucker now rides the range with a heart turned to stone, still scouring the canyons for Jake.

Still wary of each other, Daisy and James wait and pray for Sage's safe arrival. As Daisy pours her sorrow and hope into new talismans of love's magic and healing, she will need all the strength and wisdom she can find to learn that you cannot close the door on the past, but sometimes, if you step through it, it can lead you home.

Played out against a timeless landscape of transcendent beauty, Dream Country is Luanne Rice's greatest achievement yet. At once a haunting love story, a gripping mystery, and a mesmerizing family saga, it will break your heart and mend it again


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A compelling plot and nuanced character portrayals contribute to the emotional impact of Rice's ninth novel, a transcendent story about the power of hope and family love. Daisy Tucker has built a comfortable life with her 16-year-old daughter, Sage, in Silver Bay, Conn., where she has gained a reputation for designing jewelry that seems to have inspirational powers. Combining artistry with her knowledge of Native American myths and legends, Daisy creates pieces that bring people together, heal wounds and serve as talismans. But no combination of gemstones and carved animal bones can assuage the pain in Daisy's life. Sage's twin brother, Jake, disappeared in the wild country of Wyoming during a cattle roundup 13 years ago, when he was three. Fleeing the scene of tragedy with her daughter, Daisy left her husband, James, behind at his family cattle ranch and moved to New England to be close to her sister, Hathaway. Now Daisy faces another crisis when a pregnant Sage runs away with her boyfriend, Ben, intent on a new life with her father at the ranch. Ben has second thoughts and decides to return home, so Sage heads on alone. Hitchhiking leads to danger, and a mysterious, tattooed teenager rescues Sage and agrees to drive her to Wyoming. Daisy joins James in Wyoming, where another teenager, calling himself "The Guardian," is stalking the ranch. Rice (Cloud Nine) creates believable dramatic tension about Jake's true fate, though the suspense lies mainly in whether the other characters will realize what has become of him. Though she overdoes the sentimentality, her fans always welcome the family values her stories celebrate. Author tour. (Jan. 30) Forecast: Among writers of women's fiction, Rice has a loyal following based on her ability to place realistic characters in atmospheric backgrounds and crisis situations. Cloud Nine became a bestseller in paperback. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
In this engaging family saga, narrator Laural Merlington is outstanding as the voice of three generations of the Tucker clan. It seems that true love magically materializes for those who purchase Daisy Tucker's Native American-inspired jewelry designs. Daisy, however, has not been that lucky in love, and, after nursing a broken heart for years, she seems to be on the brink of another tragedy. Her 16-year-old pregnant daughter, Sage, has taken off on a cross-country pilgrimage to her father's Wyoming cattle ranch. Because Sage's twin brother, Jake, disappeared into the ranch's canyons at age three, Daisy can't bear the thought of Sage returning there. When Daisy arrives at the ranch, she must confront the tragic past, as well as her still powerful feelings for her ex-husband. Vivid descriptions of the Wyoming landscape, quality character development, and just the right amount of suspense combine to make this an excellent choice for all popular fiction collections. Beth Farrell, Portage Cty. Dist. Lib., MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Evocative ... [a] fierce family drama.”—People

“A moving story of love and reunion ... an absolute joy to read ... I finally put Dream Country down at 2 a.m. and almost called in sick the next day to finish it.”—Denver Post

“Superb ... stunning.”—Houston Chronicle

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553901115
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/28/2004
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 166,642
  • File size: 1,017 KB

Meet the Author

Luanne Rice
Luanne Rice is the author of twenty-five novels, most recently Last Kiss, Light of the Moon, What Matters Most, The Edge of Winter, Sandcastles, Summer of Roses, Summer’s Child, Beach Girls, and her soon-to-be-released new hardcover, The Letters, written with Joseph Monninger. She lives in New York City and Old Lyme, Connecticut.


From the Paperback edition.

Biography

Luanne Rice is the New York Times- bestselling author who has inspired the devotion of readers everywhere with her moving novels of love and family. She has been hailed by critics for her unique gifts, which have been described as "a beautiful blend of love and humor, with a little magic thrown in."

Rice began her writing career in 1985 with her debut novel Angels All Over Town. Since then, she has gone on to pen a string of heartwarming bestsellers. Several of her books have been adapted for television, including Crazy in Love, Blue Moon, Follow the Stars Home, and Beach Girls.

Rice was born in New Britain, Connecticut, where her father sold typewriters and her mother, a writer and artist, taught English. Throughout her childhood, Rice spent winters in New Britain and summers by Long Island Sound in Old Lyme, where her mother would hold writing workshops for local children. Rice's talent emerged at a very young age, and her first short story was published in American Girl Magazinewhen she was 15.

Rice later attended Connecticut College, but dropped out when her father became very ill. At this point, she knew she wanted to be a writer. Instead of returning to college, Rice took on many odd jobs, including working as a cook and maid for an exalted Rhode Island family, as well as fishing on a scallop boat during winter storms. These life experiences not only cultivated the author's love and talent for writing, but shaped the common backdrops in her novels of family and relationships on the Eastern seaboard. A true storyteller with a unique ability to combine realism and romance, Rice continues to enthrall readers with her luminous stories of life's triumphs and challenges.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Luanne:

"I take guitar lessons."

  • "I was queen of the junior prom. Voted in, according to one high school friend I saw recently, as a joke because my date and I were so shy, everyone thought it would be hilarious to see us onstage with crowns on our heads. It was 1972, and the theme of the prom was Color My World. For some reason I told my guitar teacher that story, and he said Yeah, color my world with goat's blood."

  • "I shared a room with both sisters when we were little, and I felt sorry for kids who had their own rooms."

  • "To support myself while writing in the early days, I worked as a maid and cook in one of the mansions in Newport, Rhode Island. I'd learned to love to cook in high school, by taking French cooking from Sister Denise at the convent next door to the school. The family I worked for didn't like French cooking and preferred broiled meat, well done, and frozen vegetables. They were particular about the brand—they liked the kind with the enclosed sauce packet. My grandmother Mim, who'd always lived with us, had taken the ferry from Providence to Newport every weekend during her years working at the hosiery factory, so being in that city made me feel connected to her."

  • "I lived in Paris. The apartment was in the Eighth Arrondissement. Every morning I'd take my dog for a walk to buy the International Herald Tribune and have coffee at a café around the corner. Then I'd go upstairs to the top floor, where I'd converted one of the old servant's rooms into a writing room, and write. For breaks I'd walk along the Seine and study my French lesson. Days of museums, salons du thé, and wandering the city. Living in another country gave me a different perspective on the world. I'm glad I realized there's not just one way to see things.

    While living there, I found out my mother had a brain tumor. She came to Paris to stay with me and have chemotherapy at the American Hospital. She'd never been on a plane before that trip. In spite of her illness, she loved seeing Paris. I took her to London for a week, and as a teacher of English and a lover of Dickens, that was her high point.

    After she died, I returned to France and made a pilgrimage to the Camargue, in the South. It is a mystical landscape of marsh grass, wild bulls, and white horses. It is home to one of the largest nature sanctuaries in the world, and I saw countless species of birds. The town of Stes. Maries de la Mer is inspiring beyond words. Different cultures visit the mysterious Saint Sarah, and the presence of the faithful at the edge of the sea made me feel part of something huge and eternal. And all of it inspired my novel Light of the Moon."

  • "I dedicated a book to Bruce Springsteen. It's The Secret Hour, which at first glance isn't a novel you'd connect with him—the novel is about a woman whose sister might or might not have been taken by a serial killer. I wrote it during a time when I felt under siege, and I used those deeply personal feelings for my fiction. Bruce was touring and I was attending his shows with a good friend. The music and band and Bruce and my friend made me feel somehow accompanied and lightened as I went through that time and reached into those dark places.

    During that period I also wrote two linked books—Summer's Childand Summer of Roses. They deal with the harsh reality of domestic violence and follow The Secret Hour and The Perfect Summer When I look back at those books, that time of my life, I see myself as a brave person. Instead of hiding from painful truths, I tried to explore and bring them to the light through my fiction. During that period, I met amazing women and became involved with trying to help families affected by abuse—in particular, a group near my small town in Connecticut, and Deborah Epstein's domestic violence clinic at Georgetown University Law Center. I learned that emotional abuse leaves no overt outward scars, but wounds deeply, in ways that take a long time to heal. A counselor recommended The Verbally Abusive Relationshipby Patricia Evans. It is life-changing, and I have given it to many women over the years."

  • "I became a vegetarian. I decided that, having been affected by brutality, I wanted only gentleness and peace in my life. Having experienced fear, I knew I could never willingly inflict harm or fear on another creature. All is related. A friend reminds me of a great quote in the Zen tradition: "How you do anything is how you do everything."
  • Read More Show Less
      1. Date of Birth:
        September 25, 1955
      2. Place of Birth:
        New Britain, CT

    Read an Excerpt

    At seven a.m., Daisy Tucker paused at the foot of the stairs to smell the laundry she held in her arms. She had gotten up an hour early to wash her daughter's clothes, throwing an extra sheet of fabric softener into the dryer the way Sage liked it.

    Mounting the stairs, Daisy wondered why her heart was pounding. She felt nervous, as if she were applying for a new job instead of waking up her sixteen-year-old with a pile of clean clothes. The house was quiet, flooded with thin morning light. While waiting for the laundry to finish, Daisy had gone to her spare-room jewelry studio to work on a bracelet that she hoped to finish that afternoon. But she had been too upset to concentrate.

    Daisy and Sage lived alone. There had been no witnesses last night to hear Daisy screaming like a banshee, see her pulling her own hair like a caricature of a maniac. There had been no one present to watch Sage sit back in her inflatable chair, messy dark hair falling across her face, observing her frustrated mother with cool detachment in her wide green eyes, no one to watch that composure crumble under Daisy's words.

    Sage had been wearing the clothes Daisy now held in her arms, and they had been mud-stained and sopping wet. She had been out with Ben Davis, her boyfriend, until midnight, even though she had promised to be home by nine. They had gone canoeing and capsized. In late October, Silver Bay, Connecticut was frosty and cold, and all Daisy had been able to think about was how they might have drowned in the dark.

    The phone rang. Still holding the clothes, Daisy walked to her bedroom. Wondering who it could be, ready to be stern to Ben, she picked up.

    "Hello?" she said.

    "How's my wayward niece?"

    "Sleeping," Daisy said, relaxing at the sound of her sister's voice. "But it was touch and go last night. When she walked in all soaked and bedraggled, I wanted to kill her."

    "'Kill'?" Hathaway asked. "That seems like a strong word. Perhaps you mean 'maim.'"

    "Oh, Hath," Daisy said, almost laughing. Talking to her sister could break the tension like nothing else. "She was bad, but I was worse. The mad twin took over. I was standing over her, slavering—truly, foam was dripping from my mouth—"

    "Did you ground her until college?"

    "Yes, and I told her only stupid girls go out canoeing with boys until midnight on school nights," Daisy said, cringing as she remembered her words, her tone of voice. "Stupid, slutty girls."

    "I hope you told her she could never see Ben again," Hathaway said, knowing that, last night notwithstanding, Daisy liked Ben. He was polite, serious about his schoolwork, too mild to ignite any real passion in Sage.

    "Of course I did." Daisy stared miserably at the clothes she held, knowing that the hour of truth was at hand.

    "She did come home late," Hathaway said. "On a school night. Plus, there was ice on my birdbath this morning. Just a thin coating, but still. It was cold out—no wonder you lost it."

    "I hate that I called her slutty."

    "No, you just compared her to slutty girls. That's different."

    "I feel awful." Standing over her sulking teenager, looking into those huge eyes, Daisy had felt as if her heart could break. She was an overprotective mother, and she knew it. Sage's twin brother, Jake, had disappeared when he was three, and that fact informed every decision Daisy had made ever since regarding Sage. All Daisy had ever wanted was to protect her children. With a slim body, full mouth, and wide, knowing eyes, Sage had lost the last vestiges of babyhood. Still. Daisy had looked straight past those features to see the infant she and Sage's father had brought home from the hospital sixteen years ago.

    "I don't want her to get hurt," Daisy said.

    "I know," Hathaway said gently.

    "But I said some awful things. I could see it in her eyes. I have to go wake her up now. I did her laundry, and now I want to sit on the edge of her bed."

    "And tell her you love her."

    "And everyone makes mistakes."

    "But you'll ground her for life if she ever does it again..."

    "Right," Daisy said, laughing.

    Hanging up, she felt a little better. Talking to Hathaway had helped her put the situation into perspective. A single mother raising a smart daughter, Daisy was ultravigilant about keeping Sage's focus on schoolwork, away from boys. Generations of daughters had been staying out too late, falling into lazy rivers. That didn't make them bad children, and it didn't mean they had bad mothers. Many years had passed since Jake's death, time for Daisy to tell herself again and again she wasn't to blame.

    Sunlight streamed through the bedroom windows, into the upstairs hall. The wood floors were waxed and polished. Walking toward Sage's room, Daisy thought about what a nice house they lived in. It was a small saltbox, safe and enclosed, with a sliver of view down the cove. Daisy had bought and paid for it herself, selling the jewelry she made and saving her money. Sage might dream of riding the range, living the ranch life, but Daisy reassured herself that she was doing a good job, making a fine home for herself and her daughter right here on Pumpkin Lane.

    Taking a deep breath, Daisy took hold of the doorknob to Sage's room. She said a prayer, that she could stay calm no matter what, that she wouldn't rise to any bait Sage might float her way—intentionally or not. This only felt like a war, and merely because Daisy loved the girl so much. Forcing herself to smile, she entered her daughter's bedroom.

    The room was empty.

    Sage's bed had not been slept in. It was neatly made, the Indian blanket drawn up over the pillows. Daisy could see the outline of her daughter's body, where she had lain outside the covers. A drawer was partly open, and Daisy saw that clothes were missing.

    Posters of Wyoming hung everywhere. Purple peaks—the Wind River Mountain Range, the Medicine Bows, the Big Horns, and the Snowies—filled the walls, along with blowups of cowboy corrals and galloping mustangs. Her father had sent her a rack of elk antlers, and she had turned them into a shrine: The single picture she had of him hung among turquoise beads, horseshoes, the pelt of a jackrabbit, and her brother's blue booties.

    A note lay on Sage's desk. The second Daisy saw it, a small sound escaped her. She dropped the neatly folded laundry and touched her heart.

    Her hands shaking, she picked up the note.

    Sage had been upset when she'd written it. Daisy could tell by the spidery handwriting, the way the ink had blotched and trailed off, the terrible terseness of the message from a girl who had always loved to talk, more than anything.

    Daisy stared at the words. She looked for "Dear Mom" and "Love, Sage," but there were only four words, and in the time it took to read them, Daisy felt the world cave in around her:

    "I HAVE TO GO."

    From the Hardcover edition.

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    Introduction

    A novel filled with tender reunions and poignant turns of fate, Dream Country showcases the storytelling power of bestselling novelist Luanne Rice at her finest. Daisy and James Tucker faced every parent’s worst fear: thirteen years ago when, their little boy vanished, disappearing into the canyons of Wyoming, never to be found. The devastating loss shattered his family. James stayed in the west, hoping that his son might be found again. Daisy settled in Connecticut, raising their remaining child, Sage’s twin sister, Sage. Now, hiding a startling secret, sixteen-year-old Sage has disappeared too, setting off on a dangerous cross-country journey in search of safe harbor with her father and the rugged land he calls home. As she nears her destination, Sage’s pilgrimage becomes a remarkable story of survival and redemption—and the miracles that can make a family whole again.

    The questions and discussion topics that follow are intended to enhance your reading of Luanne Rice’s Dream Country. We hope they will enrich your experience of this mesmerizing novel.
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    Foreword

    1. Discuss the novel’s title. What dreams and hopes do the characters share? What keeps their dreams alive?

    2. What makes Daisy unusual among single moms? How does her relationship with Sage compare to Ben’s relationship with his mother? Does Daisy nurture Sage’s ability to take care of herself?

    3. How do Sage’s feelings about her father change throughout the novel? Is her image of him realistic?

    4. What legacy of young love does Daisy pass on to Sage? What aspects of Daisy’s past does she see in her daughter?

    5. What is Louisa’s role in the characters’ lives? What makes her a unique source of wisdom? How does she compare to the recollections Daisy has of her own parents?

    6. What does Wyoming represent to Daisy and Sage? How does the landscape of Wyoming compare to Connecticut? How do these two settings reflect the characters’ identities?

    7. What is the significance of Daisy’s jewelry, and her belief that in some way she is giving her love away with each piece? What powers do you believe her jewelry possesses? How does her understanding of the spirit world echo David’s?

    8. How are Daisy and James able to heal themselves and each other enough to rekindle their love? How is their relationship affected by years of not knowing Jake’s fate? Who was wounded the most by his disappearance?

    9. In what ways does David rescue Sage, emotionally as well as physically? Why does he understand the suffering induced at the puppy farm? What makes him a good savior?

    10. What does it take to convince David that not all parents are out for themselves? What does it take to convinceJames that vengeance will not quell his pain?

    11. How did your impressions of Paul shift throughout the novel? Ultimately, what were his motivations?

    12. What is the significance of the snow geese’s return in the novel’s closing scene?

    13. Discuss the homecomings that have made a significant impact on your life. Was forgiveness a necessary part of the process?

    14. How does Dream Country enhance themes of family ties and hope in other Luanne Rice novels you have read?

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    Reading Group Guide

    1. Discuss the novel’s title. What dreams and hopes do the characters share? What keeps their dreams alive?

    2. What makes Daisy unusual among single moms? How does her relationship with Sage compare to Ben’s relationship with his mother? Does Daisy nurture Sage’s ability to take care of herself?

    3. How do Sage’s feelings about her father change throughout the novel? Is her image of him realistic?

    4. What legacy of young love does Daisy pass on to Sage? What aspects of Daisy’s past does she see in her daughter?

    5. What is Louisa’s role in the characters’ lives? What makes her a unique source of wisdom? How does she compare to the recollections Daisy has of her own parents?

    6. What does Wyoming represent to Daisy and Sage? How does the landscape of Wyoming compare to Connecticut? How do these two settings reflect the characters’ identities?

    7. What is the significance of Daisy’s jewelry, and her belief that in some way she is giving her love away with each piece? What powers do you believe her jewelry possesses? How does her understanding of the spirit world echo David’s?

    8. How are Daisy and James able to heal themselves and each other enough to rekindle their love? How is their relationship affected by years of not knowing Jake’s fate? Who was wounded the most by his disappearance?

    9. In what ways does David rescue Sage, emotionally as well as physically? Why does he understand the suffering induced at the puppy farm? What makes him a good savior?

    10. What does it take to convince David that not all parents are out for themselves? What does it take to convince James that vengeance will not quell his pain?

    11. How did your impressions of Paul shift throughout the novel? Ultimately, what were his motivations?

    12. What is the significance of the snow geese’s return in the novel’s closing scene?

    13. Discuss the homecomings that have made a significant impact on your life. Was forgiveness a necessary part of the process?

    14. How does Dream Country enhance themes of family ties and hope in other Luanne Rice novels you have read?

    Read More Show Less

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4.5
    ( 36 )
    Rating Distribution

    5 Star

    (24)

    4 Star

    (6)

    3 Star

    (4)

    2 Star

    (0)

    1 Star

    (2)

    Your Rating:

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
    • Posted March 19, 2009

      Excellent read!

      I started reading, & couldn't put it down. I think that this is one of Luanne Rice's books that touched me the most. This book helps you to understand why all young girls need a strong male role model in their
      lives & why so many of them go looking for love in all the wrong places.

      3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted August 22, 2002

      GREAT READ FOR A COLD WINTERS WEEKEND

      This is the first Luanne Rice book that I have read. I enjoyed it so much. It's a far cry from the murder mysteries that I usually read so I wasn't sure if I would like it. The characters were great and I could really feel emotion for all of them. I would love for Ms. Rice to have a sequal to this book

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 3, 2002

      Spellbinding

      This was my first Luann Rice book, I loved it. I stayed awake 2 nights until very late, I just couldn't put it down. The way she describes the mountains and spiritual connections were soul stirring. I wanted to be riding the mountains with Daisy.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted August 19, 2004

      MY FAVORITE

      This book is my favorite. Tells the hardship of a lost girl in search of her father. It explains many problems modern day teenagers now face. Truely a journey to remember. A page turner thats for sure.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 27, 2003

      Wow

      This book was my first Luanne Rice book, but I intend to not make it my last. This was the most emotionally charged book I have read since i was extremely young and read 'Where the Red Fern Grows'. Wow, this book really brings people alive and shows so many family bonds. But, not only does it show the bonds, it shows the pain and suffering of families that didn't live the 'american dream', for whatever reason that may have been. I will cherish this book on my list of 'best ever read' for a very long time!

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 22, 2014

      Buck

      Pu<_>ssy

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 19, 2014

      Lydia

      Good how ar u bad

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 22, 2014

      Rose to buck

      Uhhhhhhhh......

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 6, 2014

      Ana

      "Maybe... IDK"

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 6, 2014

      A fat lady

      Wanders in, then stops, staring.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 6, 2014

      Chloe

      Have you seen kyle. Vanessa is so lucky. But your right. They are.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 12, 2014

      Sara

      Hey babe

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    • Anonymous

      Posted February 27, 2009

      Dream Country

      I love everything Luanne Rice writes. Lovely story.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted October 31, 2003

      Easy weekend read

      Good,quick read. Perfect for the I-don't-want-to-think-too-hard set. Predictable plot, but still enjoyable!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted November 1, 2003

      dream county

      I have read the book of dream county, it is a wounderful book, I have injoy it very much,it just put me in tears when the little boy jake got lost,but on the ending when jake sister sage,had a good felling jake is her lost brother,it sure was a happy ending, thank you,

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 14, 2003

      great

      I loved this book I've read a lot of Luanne Rice books but this is my absolute favorite so far! If you haven't read it make time to this summer!

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    • Anonymous

      Posted December 11, 2002

      Wonderful rainy day book

      I've never read a Luanne Rice book before, but I was pleasantly surprised at the intense pleasure I found in this book. Her characters are well defined and described. The book has a nice pace and enough mystery to keep you turning the pages.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 5, 2002

      A Touching Story

      This was an awesome book! I loved it! I just got so into it! Luanne Rice inspired me to write a story. I do love to write though. My favorite charactor was Sage. It is amazing how close I felt to her when I was done with the book! Sage is a really pretty name, too.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted March 11, 2002

      Magical

      This was the first Luanne Rice book that I've read, but it will not be my last. 'Dream Country' is a magical book. I fell in love with its characters and the vast Wyoming terrain. This is the most emotionally moving book I have read in years. Although I finished reading it nearly a month ago, I find my mind wandering time and time again to Daisy, Jake, Sage and James - to 'Dream Country'. My praises to Luanne Rice!

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    • Anonymous

      Posted February 9, 2002

      Not a favorite of author Luane Rice

      I wasnt able to put this down but it was a book I didn't love. I had a hard time with the father not seeing his daughter ofr 13 years because he had lost his son. Why lose both of your kids??As a mom it was hard for me to relate. Also found it a little predicatble.

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