Dream Work

( 3 )

Overview


Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver’s American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1983. The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness — so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive — continues in Dream Work. Additionally, she has turned her attention in these poems to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit — to accepting the truth about one’s personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the ...
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Overview


Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver’s American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1983. The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness — so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive — continues in Dream Work. Additionally, she has turned her attention in these poems to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit — to accepting the truth about one’s personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the failures of human relationships.

By the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of American poetry published in 1983.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Her poems are wonderingly perceptive and strongly written, but beyond that they are a spirited, expressive meditation on the impossibili­ties of what we call lives, and on the gratifications of change.” —Hayden Carruth

“Oliver’s poems are thoroughly convincing—as genuine, moving, and implausible as the first caressing breeze of spring.” —The New York Times Book Review

“One of the astonishing aspects of [Oliver’s] work is the consistency of tone over this long period. What changes is an increased focus on nature and an increased precision with language that has made her one of our very best poets. . . . These poems sustain us rather than divert us. Although few poets have fewer human beings in their poems than Mary Oliver, it is ironic that few poets also go so far to help us forward.” —Stephen Dobyns, The New York Times Book Review

Library Journal
In the making of her poems, Oliver wields the most delicate of instruments: precision similes and astonishing metaphors. Though Dream Work , her seventh book, is somewhat less sucessful than Twelve Moons or American Primitive , which won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize, few lyric voices can match hers in paying homage to the natural world. Yet, her ``dream works'' can be palpably tragic. Inured to the absence of her estranged father (``Rage'' and ``A Visitor''), Oliver ``saw what love might have done had we loved in time.'' And ``Members of the Tribe'' is a remarkable address to artists and poets on death and art. There are still too many echoes of James Wright in her workreferences to body, blessing, blossom, and bone. But that is a minor demur against one who is developing into a major poet. J.P. Lewis, Integrative Studies Dept., Otterbein Coll., Westerville, Ohio
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780871130693
  • Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/28/1994
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 90
  • Sales rank: 194,587
  • Product dimensions: 5.54 (w) x 8.24 (h) x 0.29 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I
Dogfish 3
Morning Poem 6
The Chance to Love Everything 8
Trilliums 10
Rage 12
Wild Geese 14
Knife 15
Shadows 17
Dreams 18
The River 20
Consequences 22
Robert Schumann 23
Clamming 24
The Fire 26
Banyan 27
Whispers 29
Driving Through the Wind River Reservation: A Poem of Black Bear 31
Members of the Tribe 32
Starfish 36
The Journey 38
A Visitor 40
The House 42
Stanley Kunitz 44
Part II
Orion 49
One or Two Things 50
Poem 52
Marsh Hawks 54
Bowing to the Empress 55
The Turtle 57
Sunrise 59
Two Kinds of Deliverance 61
The Swimmer 63
Milkweed 65
The Waves 66
Landscape 68
The Shark 69
Storm in Massachusetts, September 1982 71
Acid 73
Black Snakes 75
The Moths 77
At Sea 79
1945-1985: Poem for the Anniversary 81
At Loxahatchie 84
Coming Home 86
The Sunflowers 88
Acknowledgments 90
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 10, 2013

    Highly recommended.

    This is a remarkable collection of poetry containing some of her best known works. If you love nature and its ability to change us as people, you will read this collection from beginning to end. She uses nature as her source and our ability to see our place in it as the theme. I am giving a copy of this book to a friend for Christmas. Her use of language is stunning and always surprising. As a writer, I always wish I'd thought of it first because of its unusual accuracy. Get and give a copy.

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    Posted October 26, 2012

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    Posted November 6, 2008

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