BN.com Gift Guide

Dreaming in Books: The Making of the Bibliographic Imagination in the Romantic Age [NOOK Book]

Overview

At the turn of the nineteenth century, publishing houses in London, New York, Paris, Stuttgart, and Berlin produced books in ever greater numbers. But it was not just the advent of mass printing that created the era’s “bookish” culture. According to Andrew Piper, romantic writing and romantic writers played a crucial role in adjusting readers to this increasingly international and overflowing literary environment. Learning how to use and to want books occurred through more than the technological, commercial, or ...

See more details below
Dreaming in Books: The Making of the Bibliographic Imagination in the Romantic Age

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$20.00 List Price

Overview

At the turn of the nineteenth century, publishing houses in London, New York, Paris, Stuttgart, and Berlin produced books in ever greater numbers. But it was not just the advent of mass printing that created the era’s “bookish” culture. According to Andrew Piper, romantic writing and romantic writers played a crucial role in adjusting readers to this increasingly international and overflowing literary environment. Learning how to use and to want books occurred through more than the technological, commercial, or legal conditions that made the growing proliferation of books possible; the making of such bibliographic fantasies was importantly a product of the symbolic operations contained within books as well.

            Examining novels, critical editions, gift books, translations, and illustrated books, as well as the communities who made them, Dreaming in Books tells a wide-ranging story of the book’s identity at the turn of the nineteenth century. In so doing, it shows how many of the most pressing modern communicative concerns are not unique to the digital age but emerged with a particular sense of urgency during the bookish upheavals of the romantic era. In revisiting the book’s rise through the prism of romantic literature, Piper aims to revise our assumptions about romanticism, the medium of the printed book, and, ultimately, the future of the book in our so-called digital age.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New Republic

"Andrew Piper has written a book about the nineteenth century’s romance with books, looking at the many ways in which the physical character of a book and its illustrations shaped a reader’s avidity. Piper’s scholarly history is fueled by a bookish ardor—you can feel the love that went into his footnotes. This writer’s thinking comes straight out of the long afternoons he must have spent in the library, pulling book after book off the shelves, experiencing the power not only of words but also of bindings, typefaces, and illustrations."—Jed Perl, The New Republic, "The Best Art Books of 2009"

— Jed Perl

The New Republic - Jed Perl

"Andrew Piper has written a book about the nineteenth century’s romance with books, looking at the many ways in which the physical character of a book and its illustrations shaped a reader’s avidity. Piper’s scholarly history is fueled by a bookish ardor—you can feel the love that went into his footnotes. This writer’s thinking comes straight out of the long afternoons he must have spent in the library, pulling book after book off the shelves, experiencing the power not only of words but also of bindings, typefaces, and illustrations."
ACLA, Harry Levin Prize, 2011 runner-up - Harry Levin Prize Citation ACLA

“Beyond its value as a contribution to the broader history of the book, Piper’s relational study of the book aims to reassess today’s pervasive discourse of anxiety about the end of book culture in the digital age, suggesting instead that the book and the computer (along with other media) have existed and will continue to coexist side by side.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226669748
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 8/22/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Andrew Piper teaches German and European literature at McGill University and is the author of Book Was There: Reading in Electronic Times, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

List of Illustrations

Introduction / Bibliographic Subjects

“Hypothesis: All is Leaf”    

Books: Past, Present, and Future   

Is Literary History Book History?    

Bibliographic Romanticism    

Romanticizing Books  

One / Networking

Fortresses of the Spirit    

Rethinking the Book of Everything   

The Novel as Network: J.W. Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister’s Travels   

The Problem of the Where   

The Ladies’ Pocket-Book and the Excerpt    

The Ausgabe letzter Hand and a Poetics of the Version    

Cartography and the Novel   

The Anatomy of the Book: The Work of Art as Technological Präparat   

Coda: Faust and the Future  

Two / Copying

Making Classics   

The Combinatory Spirit and the Collected Edition   

Producing Corporeal Integrity (Wieland, Byron, Rousseau)   

Reprinting, Reproducibility, and the Novella Collection   

E. T. A. Hoffmann’s The Serapion Brothers and the Crisis of Originality    

“The Uncanny Guest” and the Poetics of the Same   

The Plot of the Returning Husband   

The Magnetic Doppelgänger   

The Whisper, Noise, and the Acoustics of Relocatability   

The Collectivity of the Copy   

Again  

Three / Processing

Printing the Past (Intermediality and the Book I)   

The Editor’s Rise and Fall   

Immaculate Reception: From Erneuung to Critical Edition (Tieck, Hagen, Lachmann)   

Walter Scott, the Ballad, and the Book   

The Borders of Books: Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border    

Narrating Editing: The Historical Novel and Tales of My Landlord   

“By Heart” v. “From the Heart” in The Heart of Mid-Lothian   

Producing Singularity  

Four / Sharing

Assorted Books: The Romantic Miscellany (Almanacs, Taschenbücher, Gift-Books)   

Common Right v. Copyright   

Book-Keeping and the Inscription (Intermediality and the Book II)   

Hollow Texts, Textual Hollows   

The Problem of the “Of”: Washington Irving’s “An Unwritten Drama of Lord Byron”   

Sharing Sharing: Poe, Hawthorne, and Mrs. Chamberlain’s “Jottings from an Old Journal”  

Five / Overhearing

The Problem of Open Source   

“Le commerce intellectuel”   

Women, Translation, Transnation   

Overheard in Translation: Sophie Mereau’s La Princesse de Clèves and the Loose Confession   

María de Zayas’s Novelas Amorosas y Ejemplares and the Betrayal of Writing   

Boccaccio, Privacy, and Partiality: Fiammetta and Decameron 10.3  

Six / Adapting

Romantic Lines: Illustrated Books (Intermediality and the Book III)   

Afterimages: Goethe and the Lily   

Stems, Spirals, and the New Scientific Graphics    

Overwriting: Balzac between Script and Scribble   

Parallels, or Stendhal and the Line of the Self   

Coda: Sebald’s Bibliographic Vanishing Points  

In Place of an Afterword / Next to the Book

Lection/Selection   

Book Was There, It Was There   

Besides: Towards a Translational Humanism   

Beckett’s “Eff”  

Notes

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)