Dressing for Dinner in the Naked City: And Other Stories from the Wall Street Journal's

Dressing for Dinner in the Naked City: And Other Stories from the Wall Street Journal's "Middle Column"

by Jane Berentson
     
 

Never mind who's buying and who's selling. The feature that millions of Wall Street Journal readers look for first is the "middle column," a healthy dose of the exotic, intriguing, and entertaining in the midst of the everyday. This first-ever collection brings together the very best of the column's offbeat offerings.See more details below

Overview

Never mind who's buying and who's selling. The feature that millions of Wall Street Journal readers look for first is the "middle column," a healthy dose of the exotic, intriguing, and entertaining in the midst of the everyday. This first-ever collection brings together the very best of the column's offbeat offerings.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Variously called A-heds or the middle column, the WSJ 's front page features are a quirky counterpoint to the financial news. Berentson, the column's editor since 1989, has collected a decade's worth of smart, funny, insightful writing on things most readers didn't think they wanted to know about: a library for unpublished books; Romanian baseball; fat rendering; the sex life of sea slugs; Yugoslav nudists. Most of the pieces are journalistic gimmes--expanded, well-written variations on kids/animals/Brits/lawyers say/do/buy/eat the darndest things. Some take more work like Ron Suskind's 1990 piece in which eight S & L experts examine George Bailey's banking practices in It's a Wonderful Life or Paul Carroll's participatory investigations of pro wrestling and a transatlantic sailing race. Charles McCoy's report on the fight to save the sea otters and Peter Waldman's story of a couple torn apart by the Persian Gulf war are touching but definitely in the minority in a collection that leaves the reader entertained and with a lifetime supply of amusing cocktail chatter. (June)
Library Journal
The Wall Street Journal may have a reputation for serious investigative journalism, but its most popular section is the front-page ``middle column'' or ``Ahed'' (because the headlines look like a capital A). Here readers, weary of grim economic forecasts and stock market scandals, can peruse the latest news on dress-stealing transvestites, pet psychics, Wienermobiles, and other eccentric characters, bizarre events, and quirky trends. Column editor Berentson has collected the best of these stories published since 1984. Arranged into 13 sections (Creatures, Great and Small, Modern Romance, There Will Always Be An England, etc.), they feature the WSJ's legendary punning headlines and witty prose. For popular journalism collections.-Wilda Williams, ``Library Journal''

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786880133
Publisher:
Hyperion
Publication date:
04/25/1994
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 0.75(h) x 10.25(d)

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