Dressing Renaissance Florence: Families, Fortunes, and Fine Clothing / Edition 1

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Overview

As portraits, private diaries, and estate inventories make clear, elite families of the Italian Renaissance were obsessed with fashion, investing as much as forty percent of their fortunes on clothing. In fact, the most elaborate outfits of the period could cost more than a good-sized farm out in the Mugello. Yet despite its prominence in both daily life and the economy, clothing has been largely overlooked in the rich historiography of Renaissance Italy. In Dressing Renaissance Florence, however, Carole Collier Frick provides the first in-depth study of the Renaissance fashion industry, focusing on Florence, a city founded on cloth, a city of wool manufacturers, finishers, and merchants, of silk dyers, brocade weavers, pearl dealers, and goldsmiths. From the artisans who designed and assembled the outfits to the families who amassed fabulous wardrobes, Frick's wide-ranging and innovative interdisciplinary history explores the social and political implications of clothing in Renaissance Italy's most style-conscious city.

Frick begins with a detailed account of the industry itself—its organization within the guild structure of the city, the specialized work done by male and female workers of differing social status, the materials used and their sources, and the garments and accessories produced. She then shows how the driving force behind the growth of the industry was the elite families of Florence, who, in order to maintain their social standing and family honor, made continuous purchases of clothing—whether for everyday use or special occasions—for their families and households. And she concludes with an analysis of the clothes themselves: what pieces made up an outfit; how outfits differed for men, women, and children; and what colors, fabrics, and design elements were popular. Further, and perhaps more basically, she asks how we know what we know about Renaissance fashion and looks to both Florence's sumptuary laws, which defined what could be worn on the streets, and the depiction of contemporary clothing in Florentine art for the answer.

For Florence's elite, appearance and display were intimately bound up with self-identity. Dressing Renaissance Florence enables us to better understand the social and cultural milieu of Renaissance Italy.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Renaissance Magazine - Alana White
Seldom does one come across such a valuable and entertaining book.
Journal of Social History - John T. Paoletti
An important addition not just to the history of clothing, but to our understanding of social positioning within the visual field of Florentine culture.
Textile History
A useful and timely undertaking.

— Elizabeth Currie

Bibliotheque d'Humanisme et Renaissance
A pioneering book on the sartorial extravagance and fashions in Florence.

— L. R. N. Ashley

Reviews in History
A wonderful book, after reading which we will not be able to visualise Renaissance Florence in the same way again.

— Catherine Kovesi Killerby

Renaissance Quarterly
This lively book should convince any skeptic that fashion was a serious Renaissance business.

— Diane Owen Hughes

American Historical Review
This study nicely opens up a little-studied domain of Renaissance culture and shows the way to linking mundane craft with the dearest social aspirations of the Florentine elite.
Enterprise and Society
The Johns Hopkins University Press is to be congratulated for publishing this imaginative book linking the history of technology and guilds with social history, with the study of costume, and with artistic iconography... This book will be a delight for scholar and general reader alike.

— Daryl M. Hafter

History
The final sections of this valuable study on sumptuary legislation and the representation of clothes in art are perhaps the most effective in drawing out the significance of clothing in understanding social relationships and social power in Renaissance Florence.

— Graeme Murdock

Renaissance Magazine
Seldom does one come across such a valuable and entertaining book.

— Alana White

Journal of Social History
An important addition not just to the history of clothing, but to our understanding of social positioning within the visual field of Florentine culture.

— John T. Paoletti

Bookwatch
A fascinating college-level study, recommended for any collection strong in fashion or Renaissance history.
Textile History - Elizabeth Currie
A useful and timely undertaking.
Bibliotheque d'Humanisme et Renaissance - L. R. N. Ashley
A pioneering book on the sartorial extravagance and fashions in Florence.
Reviews in History - Catherine Kovesi Killerby
A wonderful book, after reading which we will not be able to visualise Renaissance Florence in the same way again.
Renaissance Quarterly - Diane Owen Hughes
This lively book should convince any skeptic that fashion was a serious Renaissance business.
Enterprise and Society - Daryl M. Hafter
The Johns Hopkins University Press is to be congratulated for publishing this imaginative book linking the history of technology and guilds with social history, with the study of costume, and with artistic iconography... This book will be a delight for scholar and general reader alike.
H-Italy, H-Net Reviews - Sandra Sider
Frick's thorough treatment of Renaissance costume has set a new standard of excellence for scholars working on costume of any age.
History - Graeme Murdock
The final sections of this valuable study on sumptuary legislation and the representation of clothes in art are perhaps the most effective in drawing out the significance of clothing in understanding social relationships and social power in Renaissance Florence.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Carole Collier Frick is an associate professor of history at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

Contents:

List of Illustrations and Tables

AcknowledgmentsIntroductionPART I: GUILDS AND LABOR

1. Tailors and the Guild System

2. The Craftspeople

3. Tailors in Fifteenth-Century SocietyPART II: FAMILY HONOR

4. Tailoring Family Honor

5. Family Fortunes in Clothes: The Parenti, Pucci, and Tosa

6. The Making of Wedding Gowns

7. Trousseaux for Marriage and Convent: The Minerbetti SistersPART III: FASHION AND THE COMMUNE

8. The Clothes Themselves

9. Sumptuary Legislation and the "Fashion Police"

10. Visualizing the Republic in Art: An Essay on Painted ClothesConclusionAppendixes

1. Currency and Measures

2. Categories of Clothiers

3. Cloth Required for Selected Garments

4. Two Minerbetti TrousseauxNotes

Glossary

Select Bibliography

Index

Johns Hopkins University Press

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