Drinking with Men

Drinking with Men

4.4 5
by Rosie Schaap
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Rosie Schaap has always loved bars: the wood and brass and jukeboxes, the knowing bartenders, and especially the sometimes surprising but always comforting company of regulars. Starting with her misspent youth in the bar car of a regional railroad, where at age fifteen she told commuters’ fortunes in exchange for beer, and continuing today as she slings

See more details below

Overview

Rosie Schaap has always loved bars: the wood and brass and jukeboxes, the knowing bartenders, and especially the sometimes surprising but always comforting company of regulars. Starting with her misspent youth in the bar car of a regional railroad, where at age fifteen she told commuters’ fortunes in exchange for beer, and continuing today as she slings cocktails at a neighborhood joint in Brooklyn, Schaap has learned her way around both sides of a bar and come to realize how powerful the fellowship among bar patrons can be.

In Drinking with Men, Schaap shares her unending quest for the perfect local haunt that takes her from a dive outside L.A. to a Dublin pub full of poets, and from small-town New England taverns to a character-filled bar in Tribeca. Drinking alongside artists and expats, ironworkers and soccer fanatics, she finds that these places offer a safe haven, a respite, and a place to feel most like herself. In rich, colorful prose, Schaap brings to life these seedy, warm, and wonderful rooms. Drinking with Men is a love letter to the bars, pubs, and taverns that have been Schaap’s refuge, and a celebration of the uniquely civilizing source of community that is bar culture at its best.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Schaap, a writer who writes the “Drink” column for the New York Times, sought out an early kinship with adult company and alcohol, a lifelong pursuit she fondly chronicles as she recounts the homes and families she’s made in bars around the world. With an absentee father and a complicated relationship with her mother, she gets satisfaction from the interest other adults took in her, utilizing that dynamic when she briefly becomes a tarot card reader as a teen in the bar car of the Metro North commuter train, trading readings for beers. Feeling out of place at home and at school, she drops out at 16 to follow the Grateful Dead full-time, ending up on the West Coast. In college at 19, she goes to Dublin for a summer study abroad and it’s there, at a cozy, smoky bar frequented by writers and storytellers, that Schaap feels the sense of belonging and community she’s been thirsting for. Back in the U.S., she discovers bars near school in Vermont and later in New York that offer a “safe haven, my breathing space... where I figured out how to be myself.” Feeling like a regular matters to her, providing her with an anchor and a code of kindness and decency to live by learned from how patrons and bartenders treats one other. Schaap estimates she’s passed 13,000 hours in bars, and judging by the warmth and camaraderie she evokes, it clearly has been time well spent. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Schaap measures out her life in beer and shot glasses in this beautifully composed look at a woman’s coming to age in a setting more often reserved for men: bars. Each chapter details the allures of one of Schaap’s favorite watering holes and its role in her growth as a person, writer, teacher, minister, and counselor. There is no veneer of vanity in Schaap’s tour of the taverns of her life, which results in a portrait that is detailed and genuine. VERDICT Several chapters in Schaap’s account could stand alone as short stories: readers first meet her as a fortune-telling hippie chick teenager cadging drinks on the Metro North. This book grabbed me, and I think it will grab you.

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
A memoir from This American Life contributor and New York Times Magazine "Drink" columnist Schaap. The author extolls the pleasures of "bar regularhood," focusing on those establishments with distinct atmospheres--sometimes evoking European cafe societies, other times fondly portraying out-of-the-way places with colorful owners--to demonstrate how they can serve as "relief from isolation," a "refuge from the too-deep and too-personal," and a means for broadening one's ability to listen and empathize with others. Schaap briefly acknowledges the negative aspects, especially for women who frequent bars alone, but she paints a mostly romantic portrait of discovering friendship and conviviality that is gradually tempered over time. Each chapter recounts her experiences in a particular bar--often in New York, with excursions to Dublin as well as Montreal--as touchstones that allow her to explore major turning points, from being a teenager who dropped out of high school and became a Deadhead to becoming a student at Bennington College, finding love, working as a chaplain in the aftermath of 9/11, as well as her father's death, separation and bartending in the present. Schaap suggests that early trials served as catalysts for seeking company away from home, though she admits that the need for regularhood lessened with age. The author only briefly touches on alcoholism, one possible explanation for the hundreds of hours spent in bars; what remains is a brisk, lucid account of finding a tenuous peace after a period of escapism. The conclusions reached are familiar, but Schaap's talent for balancing self-revelation with humor, melancholy and wisdom turn an otherwise niche topic into one with greater appeal.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781469236315
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
01/28/2014
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 0.62(d)

What People are saying about this

Wendy McClure

There are bar stories and there are coming-of-age stories. And then there is Rosie Schaap's thoughtful and funny chronicle that reminds us of all the drinks, dives, and deep conversations that helped make us who we are. This is a wise, engaging memoir.—Wendy McClure (author of The Wilder Life and I'm Not the New Me)

From the Publisher
"Schaap brings a poet's touch to her memoir, which brims with insight and wisdom."
–Jimmy Breslin

“This book will be a classic. There is so much joy in this book! It’s a great, comforting, wonderful, funny, inspiring, moving memoir about community and belief and the immense redemptive powers of alcohol drunk properly.”
—Kate Christensen, author of In the Drink and The Great Man

"There are bar stories and there are coming-of-age stories. And then there is Rosie Schaap's thoughtful and funny chronicle that reminds us of all the drinks, dives, and deep conversations that helped make us who we are. This is a wise, engaging memoir."
—Wendy McClure, author of The Wilder Life and I’m Not the New Me

“Schaap warmly toasts the urge so many of us share to find a spot where everybody knows your name.”
People

“A witty homage to pubs and bars and the regulars who call them home.”
O Magazine 

“[Schaap] describes the unusual camaraderie among bar ‘regulars’ with poignant specificity. It’s a cozy, intimate pleasure to go belly-to-bar with her.”
Entertainment Weekly

"With focused premise and expansive feeling... [and] very smart assessments of a mode of being that’s not given the credit it deserves. 'Drinking With Men' would pair very well this time of year with a well-aged whiskey and a handful of peanuts."
The Boston Globe

“A wonderfully funny and openhearted book from a generous, charismatic writer… [Schaap is] a born storyteller… There's no substitute for the kind of community you can find in a good tavern. And no American writer can explain it better than Rosie Schaap.”
—NPR.org

“Rosie Schaap’s New York Times column on the pleasures of drinking has always been—like the best bartenders—funny, smart, and slightly bawdy. This memoir is also all those things—and there’s no hangover.”
W Magazine

“Beautifully rendered.
”—The Daily Beast

“Funny, smart-as-hell, moving.”
Salon 

“Witty…a vivid study of both Schaap’s life in bars, often as one of the few women regulars, and a gimlet-eyed exploration of modern bar culture.”
Chicago Tribune

“[Schaap] has a way with words, writing about her experiences in the bars of her life in a heartfelt, honest, and relatable way. I would like to request a drink pairing with each chapter.”
The Atlantic Wire 

“Phenomenal… Schaap is an expert storyteller.”
Food & Wine

“Ms. Schaap has a gift for camaraderie—and excellent taste in booze.”
New York Observer 

“Pour yourself a double and let Schaap’s writing amuse and enchant you.”
BookPage 

“Schaap is a gifted storyteller.”
Time Out Chicago

“Witty, compassionate…a meditation on learning how to drink well, wisely, and with eyes wide open…if you want an elegy to good bars and a stiff drink, Schaap has you covered.”
Full Stop
 

Kate Christensen

This book will be a classic. There is so much joy in this book! It's a great, comforting, wonderful, funny, inspiring, moving memoir about community and belief and the immense redemptive powers of alcohol drunk properly.—Kate Christensen (author of In the Drink and The Great Man)

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >