Drive

Drive

4.9 17
by Alan Jackson
     
 

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Sounding thoroughly modern and thoroughly traditional all at once, the ever-reliable Alan Jackson comes down on the side of introspection and sensitivity on Drive. Which is not to suggest there’s neither wit nor rambunctiousness to be found on the 13 tracks here. George Strait sits in for an old-time drowning-my-sorrows testimonial on "Designated Drinker"; the…  See more details below

Overview

Sounding thoroughly modern and thoroughly traditional all at once, the ever-reliable Alan Jackson comes down on the side of introspection and sensitivity on Drive. Which is not to suggest there’s neither wit nor rambunctiousness to be found on the 13 tracks here. George Strait sits in for an old-time drowning-my-sorrows testimonial on "Designated Drinker"; the celebratory "That’d Be Alright" uses a merry Tex-Mex-flavored arrangement to fuel its utopian sentiments; and "Work in Progress" displays Jackson’s self-effacing humor in a swinging little ditty concerning his wife’s hopeless attempts to bring some sophistication to his lifestyle ("I know you meant well when you gave me those clogs/But my heels sure get hot down by the muffler on my hog"). But Drive belongs to its quieter moments; and in those moments the album becomes more than a collection of good songs. The title song is a beautifully realized homage to the rites of generational bonding. "A Little Bluer than That" tells a tale of epic heartbreak, complete with a moaning fiddle and pedal steel lines, a twangy guitar solo, and an eye-opening, bluer-than-blue vocal turn by co-writer Irene Kelly. Jackson’s own "Once in a Lifetime Love" heads for George Strait territory with its dreamy melody, cushy pedal steel lines, and lyrics centered on leaping fearlessly into real love when it comes along. With strong numbers such as these, Drive's most prominent song, the hit single inspired by the events of 9/11, "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)," takes on real grandeur, the simplicity and equanimity of its lyrics being a bromide to the jingoism, militarism, and hysteria loose in the country. Counseling reliance on "faith, hope and love" in a changed world, Jackson sounds like he knows whereof he speaks. Considering the alternatives, it’s not a bad plan.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Sounding thoroughly modern and thoroughly traditional all at once, the ever-reliable Alan Jackson comes down on the side of introspection and sensitivity on Drive. Which is not to suggest there’s neither wit nor rambunctiousness to be found on the 13 tracks here. George Strait sits in for an old-time drowning-my-sorrows testimonial on "Designated Drinker"; the celebratory "That’d Be Alright" uses a merry Tex-Mex-flavored arrangement to fuel its utopian sentiments; and "Work in Progress" displays Jackson’s self-effacing humor in a swinging little ditty concerning his wife’s hopeless attempts to bring some sophistication to his lifestyle ("I know you meant well when you gave me those clogs/But my heels sure get hot down by the muffler on my hog"). But Drive belongs to its quieter moments; and in those moments the album becomes more than a collection of good songs. The title song is a beautifully realized homage to the rites of generational bonding. "A Little Bluer than That" tells a tale of epic heartbreak, complete with a moaning fiddle and pedal steel lines, a twangy guitar solo, and an eye-opening, bluer-than-blue vocal turn by co-writer Irene Kelly. Jackson’s own "Once in a Lifetime Love" heads for George Strait territory with its dreamy melody, cushy pedal steel lines, and lyrics centered on leaping fearlessly into real love when it comes along. With strong numbers such as these, Drive's most prominent song, the hit single inspired by the events of 9/11, "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)," takes on real grandeur, the simplicity and equanimity of its lyrics being a bromide to the jingoism, militarism, and hysteria loose in the country. Counseling reliance on "faith, hope and love" in a changed world, Jackson sounds like he knows whereof he speaks. Considering the alternatives, it’s not a bad plan.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The odd thing about Drive is that its centerpiece and its emotional fulcrum is a song that was likely one of the last recorded for the record. That song, of course, is "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)," Alan Jackson's attempt to capture the hurt, pain, confusion, and overwhelming sadness caused by the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon on September 11, 2001. The song works because Jackson keeps his sights simple as he conveys the bewilderment and sadness of the average American in the days after the attack, sketching the little things that people did to just get through the hours or how time just stopped cold. Given the enormity of the subject -- it's simply not something that can be summarized in song -- it's a surprisingly effective and moving tune, something that signals that Jackson is indeed in the forefront of the country singers of his time because it plays to his strengths: it's within the tradition of classic country and delivered simply, but with the vernacular and production of the modern day. And that's why even if it was a last-minute addition to the record, it fits so well into a typically strong collection of material from Jackson -- musically, it fits perfectly among these heartache ballads and mid-tempo honky tonkers, but it also gives it significant emotional weight. It, in effect, acts as the anchor for the rest of the album, lending songs that are very good genre pieces -- whether it's outside material like the excellent, poppy "A Little Bluer Than That" or original material -- extra weight. The great thing is that Drive doesn't really need it, since it's filled with top-notch songs, including the great George Strait duet "Designated Drinker" and "Drive," a tribute to his dad that's nearly as affecting in its own way as "Where Were You." This is not a total shock, since Jackson's track record is one of the strongest in '90s country, but nevertheless a record this solidly crafted and emotionally resonant is a welcome event all the same.

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Product Details

Release Date:
01/15/2002
Label:
Arista
UPC:
0078636703923
catalogNumber:
67039

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Alan Jackson   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar
George Strait   Track Performer
John Wesley Ryles   Background Vocals
David Angell   String Machine
Eddie Bayers   Drums
J.T. Corenflos   Electric Guitar
Stuart Duncan   Fiddle,Mandolin
Robbie Flint   Steel Guitar
Paul Franklin   Steel Guitar
Danny Groah   Guitar
Jim Hoke   Harmonica
Irene Kelley   Background Vocals
John Kelton   Bass
Bob Mason   String Machine
Brent Mason   Electric Guitar
Matthew McCauley   Conductor
Mark McClurg   Fiddle
Gordon Mote   Piano,Keyboards
Dave Pomeroy   Bass
Bruce Rutherford   Drums
Tom Rutledge   Acoustic Guitar
Bruce Watkins   Acoustic Guitar,Banjo
Bergen White   Conductor
Roger Willis   Bass
Glenn Worf   Bass
Monty Parkey   Piano
Tony Stephens   Acoustic Guitar
Wes Hightower   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Vince Gill   Introduction
Gary Gray   Engineer
Chad Hailey   Engineer
Alan Jackson   Composer
John Kelton   Engineer
Matthew McCauley   String Arrangements
Elliot Scheiner   Audio Production
Keith Stegall   Producer
Stan Dacus   Engineer
Melanie Shelley   Groomer
Michael R. Herrington   Art Direction
Hank Williams   Mastering

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Customer Reviews

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Drive 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Alan Jackson has delivered another monster Country album that includes great songs about real Americans. Favorite songs include -- of course -- his ''Where Were You When The World Stopped Turning'' about September 11th. But this CD is deeper than even that indicates. ''Work In Progress'' is also worth the price of the CD. The duet with George Strait, ''Designated Drinker'' is good work, too. Overall, if you are a Country Music Fan and you want to know what is happening in today's Country music, this is the CD update.
Guest More than 1 year ago
just brought his new cd and it was great. every song was great. the title song DRIVE was something else. if you havent brought this, go now. i love ot so much that i brought a cassate for the car.
Guest More than 1 year ago
JUST PURCHASED AND LISTENED TO THIS CD. IT IS AN OUTSTANDING CD AS ONLY ALAN CAN DO. IT IS PURE COUNTRY.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Drive, Designated Drinker, Where were you (When the World Stopped Turnin), and The Sounds don't require you to be a country music fan, but just to be a human being with feelings to relate. These songs will be sang 100 years from now and have the same meanings to all of us.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was anxiously awaiting the arrival of this CD. It was pushed up because of the success of Where Were You when the world stopped turning. That song alone makes this a worthwhile investment. But then you hear Drive, for daddy Gene, and it can't help but bring back memories from anyone's childhood. And First Love has you thinking he's talking about his wife, Denise. There is so much true Alan in this album, and there are so many hours of good listening. I can't wait to see him at his next concert.
Guest More than 1 year ago
''Where Were You When The World Stopped Turning'', still gets to me everytime I hear it.I think it deserves to be Song Of The Year at next years' music awards. ''Designated Drinker'',duet with George Strait ,is also a GREAT song. If you haven't bought this CD yet, GO AND GET IT!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although I've been an Alan Jackson fan for years, this is the first CD I've purchased. Every song, is wonderful, especially Drive and Once in a Lifetime Love.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is some great music....the writing and performances are superb! The title song just about brings tears to my eyes reminding me of when my PaPa tought me to drive a standard in his old pickup out in the fields...... Way to go Alan...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been an Alan Jackson fan ever since he came out. I have every one of his Cd's and once again he has made another wonderful one called ''Drive''. Go out and get if you haven't already, listen to it and you'll see what I mean. For those who already have it, you know what I mean. Way to go Alan. Another #1 CD.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of Alan Jacksons best :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Good Cd. My Favorite song was ''Drive''
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jackson's ''Where Were You When (the World Stopped Turning)'', sums up the way most Americans felt and reacted after the 11th. It is an amazing song, and every time I hear it my eyes tear, and I see the pictures of the towers in my mind as clearly as I did that day.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoy singing the songs to this great album. Alan Jackson has demonstrated his craftmanship as a singer and songwriter. He has a beautiful voice to sing great songs. I am happy there is someone like him to bring happiness to my life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I adore Alan Jackson and this CD is my all-time favorite. I love the song with George Strait - I love the whole CD, especially with the bonus track live from the CMA's. Go AJ!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a big fan of Alan Jackson and always will be. This is easliy his best yet. This is a must have for any country fan!
Guest More than 1 year ago
When you listen to the words of Alan Jackson songs, you forget that he is a superstar. His language, rhymes & melodies remind us that he is a good ole' country boy at heart. I was touch by the song dedicated to his dad as it reminded me how excited I became when Daddy let "me" drive. This is one of those CD's you put in the player and hit repeat.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This wistful song of wishful thinking compares to the old Scottish tune WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN said to have been played the day America was born famous for all its fabulous IFs