Driven

Driven

2.6 5
by James Sallis
     
 

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Driven is the sequel to Drive, now also an award-winning film. As we exit the initial novel, Driver has killed Bernie Rose, “the only one he ever mourned,” ending his campaign against those who double-crossed him. Driven tells how that young man, done with killing, later will become the one who goes down “at 3 a

Overview

 

Driven is the sequel to Drive, now also an award-winning film. As we exit the initial novel, Driver has killed Bernie Rose, “the only one he ever mourned,” ending his campaign against those who double-crossed him. Driven tells how that young man, done with killing, later will become the one who goes down “at 3 a.m. on a clear, cool morning in a Tijuana bar.”   Seven years have passed. Driver has left the old life, become Paul West, and founded a successful business back in Phoenix. Walking down the street one day, he and his fiancee are attacked by two men and, while Driver dispatches both, his fiancee is killed.   Sinking back into anonymity, aided by his friend Felix, an ex-gangbanger and Desert Storm vet, Driver retreats, but finds that his past stalks him and will not stop. He has to turn and face it.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The enigmatic loner known as Driver, introduced in 2005’s Drive, takes to the road again after two thugs assault him and his fiancée on a Phoenix, Ariz., street in this terse, brutal, poetic, perfectly wrought sequel. Maybe Driver is paranoid, but is it really paranoia when one team of hit men after another track you down and try to put you on ice? “Two cars this time, and they’d waited for an isolated stretch of road. Chevy Caprice and a high-end Toyota.” Sallis once again pays homage to the tight behaviorist style of French noir master Jean-Patrick Manchette (“he felt the trachea give way and fold in on itself”) and the bleak existential world of criminals beloved by fans of the films of Charles Bronson and Alain Delon, not to mention the passionate cult following for the 2011 film version of Drive. As is the case for all such episodes in the life of the stoic driver, you can come into this excellent novel cold, strap in, just hit the gas, and go. Author tour. Agent: Vicky Bijur, Vicky Bijur Literary Agency. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Sallis's slim sequel to his acclaimed Drive might at first glance seem like a prose poem or a children's book. With its close attention to telling detail and a vocabulary that rarely ranges beyond two-syllable words, it is a bit of both, mixed with interludes of extreme violence, in an angst-drenched Phoenix. That is to say that this novel is a close to perfectly executed noir. By the second paragraph, Driver sees his lover viciously shot dead at his side, and this causes him to set out to discover who is after him. The language is plain, the action is brutal, and the characters are memorably and briefly etched. Typical is this characterization of a suburban couple: "Sectional couch! Jell-O salad! Mashed potatoes! Lawrence Welk!" Charles Bukowski couldn't have said it better. VERDICT Coming hard on the heels of the 2011 film version of cult favorite Drive, this gritty, gristly tale will rivet Sallis's growing audience.—Bob Lunn, Kansas City, MO
Marilyn Stasio
…[a] lean and lethal noir narrative…
—The New York Times Book Review
From the Publisher

"Lean and lethal...The underworld characters Driver deals with have a tendency to wax philosophical. 'You think about stuff much? Why you’re here, what it all means?' one of the hit men asks him. 'Not really,' Driver answers. And then he kills the guy." —New York Times

"Sallis works vividly throughout Driven, but he has a special gift for drawing cinematic chase scenes, all of which practically reek of burnt rubber and gasoline on the page...In the end, Driven is simply a great ride."—NPR

"The enigmatic loner known as Driver, introduced in 2005’s Drive, takes to the road again after two thugs assault him and his fiancée on a Phoenix street in this terse, brutal, poetic, perfectly wrought sequel." —Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Sallis, perhaps the most genuinely poetic crime writer alive, bleeds tone on every page, crafting sentences that read like a Thomas Hardy lyric." —Booklist, starred review

"Coming hard on the heels of the 2011 film version of cult favorite Drive, this gritty, gristly tale will rivet Sallis's growing audience." —Library Journal

"Imagine the heart of Jim Thompson beating in the poetic chest of James Sallis and you'll have some idea of the beauty, sadness and power of “Drive"...[it] has more thought, feeling and murderous energy than books twice its length."—Chicago Tribune, praise for Drive

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781464200113
Publisher:
Poisoned Pen Press
Publication date:
04/03/2012
Pages:
158
Sales rank:
361,310
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

JAMES SALLIS is the author of the popular Lew Griffin novels and over a dozen other books, including the biography "Chester Himes, "a "New York Times "Notable Book. He has been short-listed for the Anthony, Nebula, Edgar, Shamus, and Gold Dagger awards. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
"An "Entertainment Weekly "Top 10 Book of 2005
A "Washington Post "Best Book of 2005"

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Driven: The sequel to Drive (now a major motion Picture) 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought the first book, Drive, was excellent. I also loved the movie. This second book, in which I hope there's not a third, just plain missed the mark. In the way James Sallis writes, characters just appeared with no introduction, and that made it hard to follow. Sometimes you don't even know who Driver is talking to. I was eager to read as soon as I found there was a sequel, but I soon found myself hurriedly trying to finish it just so I could move on to something else. I was not impressed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dont buy
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
He is called, simply, Driver, because that’s what he is, that’s what he does and, he feels, that’s what he will always do. Once one of the best stunt drivers in film, his life has taken different turns, most of them illegal. But he gave up that life over six years ago, became a successful businessman named Paul West, a man with a ‘normal’ life and a fiancée he dearly loved. Until one day when his old life catches up to him, and he has to kill the two men who have suddenly appeared and attacked him, but not before his fiancée has been killed. So back he must go, to his old life in Phoenix. But soon two other men find and attempt to kill him, and he has no choice but to kill again. As his friend Manny succinctly puts it, “you have to decide what you want, else you just keep spinning around, circling the drain. You want to get away from the guys? Or you want to put them down? Well, there it is, then. We ponder and weigh and debate. While in silence, somewhere back in the darkness behind words, our decisions are made.” Now 32 years old, he goes where life, and his attempts to track down whoever is behind the continuing attempts on his life, take him, theorizing that “you moved faster with the current than against.” The author’s descriptions, in his typical [and typically wonderful] spare prose, conjure up immediate mental images: Of a tattooist, he says “His Rasta hair looked like something pulled down from attic storage, first thing you’d want to do is thwack out the dusts.” Of a young crowd in a mall food court “wagging their iPods and cellphones behind them, fatally connected.” The book is filled with the author’s - - and his protagonists - - philosophizing: “We all struggle to leave markers behind, signs that we were here, that we passed through . . . urban equivalents of cave paintings.” The sequel to the excellent “Drive,” published in 2005, I devoured the book in a single day. This was a short but memorable visit into the world created by Mr. Sallis, and it is highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was hard to follow. It seemed like every chapter was incomplete, and pages were missing. I kept getting lost and decided to quit reading. This book has only 72 pages and i quit at page 52. This will probably be the only time in history that a movie will be better then the book. I cant believe this got published.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading Drive, but I think Driven is much better. Driven is very brief like its counterpart but it was a better read because it was linear. The problem I had with Drive was that it jumped all over the place and some things were hard to follow. Going deeper into Driver's background was interesting to me, and he just beats the crap out of people without breaking a sweat.I will say that I found it very funny that everybody in this book talks like a poet regardless of their background.