Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post-9/11

Overview


The Star Trek franchise represents one of the most successful emanations of popular media in our culture. The number of books, both popular and scholarly, published on the subject of Star Trek is massive, with more and more titles printed every year. Very few, however, have looked at Star Trek in terms of the dialectics of humanism and the posthuman, the pervasiveness of advanced technology, and the complications of gender identity. In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, author Diana Relke sheds light on how the ...
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Overview


The Star Trek franchise represents one of the most successful emanations of popular media in our culture. The number of books, both popular and scholarly, published on the subject of Star Trek is massive, with more and more titles printed every year. Very few, however, have looked at Star Trek in terms of the dialectics of humanism and the posthuman, the pervasiveness of advanced technology, and the complications of gender identity. In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, author Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes of the U.S., pre- and post-9/11. From her Canadian perspective, Relke focuses on Star Treks uniquely American version of liberal humanism, extends it into a broader analysis of ideological features, and avoids a completely positive or negative critique, choosing instead to honour the contradictions inherent in the complexity of the subject.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552381649
  • Publisher: University of Calgary Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Pages: 168
  • Product dimensions: 6.25 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author


Diana M.A. Relke is founding member and professor in the Department of Womens and Gender Studies at the Univerisity of Saskatchewan. An interdisciplinist, her scholarly work has appeared in numerous collections and journals spanning the disciplines, from English literature through psychology to gender and cultural studies.
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Table of Contents

Alpha babes in the Delta Quad : postfeminism and the gendering of the Borg 1
1 Modernism/postmodernism 3
2 Regendering command 19
3 Phallic mothers 31
4 Techno-maternalism 47
5 Queen bees 61
Drones, clones and starship captains : encounters with the posthuman 73
6 Humanism/transhumanism 75
7 Cyborg emergence 87
8 Extropia of Borg 99
9 Holographic love 115
10 Time, the final frontier 133
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2006

    Drones, Clones And Alpha Babes will prove to be of immense interest to students of popular culture in general

    Diana M.A. Relke is a founding member and professor in the Department of Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Saskatchewan where she teaches courses in feminist theory, science fiction, and popular culture. In Drones, Clones And Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post-9/11, Professor Relke examines the popular Star Trek franchise and its impact upon popular culture media, revealing how the Star Trek narrative stories have influenced cultural values in the United States, including American sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes pre- and post-9/11. A work of articulate and seminal scholarship which is thoroughly accessible to be academia and non-specialist general readers, Drones, Clones And Alpha Babes will prove to be of immense interest to students of popular culture in general, and Star Trek fans in particular.

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