The Drowned World (50th Anniversary Edition) by J. G. Ballard | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Drowned World (50th Anniversary Edition)

The Drowned World (50th Anniversary Edition)

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by J. G. Ballard
     
 

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A new generation discovers "the most original English writer of the last century." —China Miéville, The Nation

Appearing in hardcover in America for the first time, this neglected Ballardian masterpiece promises to be a touchstone for environmentalists the world over.

First published in 1962, J.G. Ballard’s mesmerizing and

Overview

A new generation discovers "the most original English writer of the last century." —China Miéville, The Nation

Appearing in hardcover in America for the first time, this neglected Ballardian masterpiece promises to be a touchstone for environmentalists the world over.

First published in 1962, J.G. Ballard’s mesmerizing and ferociously imaginative novel not only gained him widespread critical acclaim but also established his reputation as one of the finest writers of a generation. The Drowned World imagines a terrifying world in which global warming has melted the ice caps and primordial jungles have overrun a tropical London. Set during the year 2145, this novel follows biologist Dr. Robert Kearns and his team of scientists as they confront a cityscape in which nature is on the rampage and giant lizards, dragonflies, and insects fiercely compete for domination.  Both an unmatched biological mystery and a brilliant retelling of Heart of Darkness—complete with a mad white hunter and his hordes of native soldiers—this “powerful and beautifully clear” (Brian Aldiss) work becomes a thrilling adventure with “an oppressive power reminiscent of Conrad” (Kingsley Amis).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871403315
Publisher:
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publication date:
07/16/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
196,470
File size:
359 KB

Meet the Author

J.G. Ballard was born in Shanghai in 1930 and lived in England from 1946 until his death in London in 2009. He is the author of nineteen novels, including Empire of the Sun, The Drought, and Crash, with many of them made into major films.
Martin Amis is one of Britain's most prolific post-war writers and a professor of creative writing at the University of Manchester. His stories and essays explore the absurdity of the postmodern condition.

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Drowned World 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A brilliant story about moderns abuducted by tribal spirtuality. There are several protagonists, and Beatrice is a combination of an elegant Gatsby "Daisy" in the beginning of the novel--and in the end, she is like a 2 Pac Shakur "When we Ride" background semi-divine, elegant female chorus voice. Using "Beatrice" to topple Dante's Inferno, Ballard composes the image of a Madonna-like abduction amidst a Shiva-esk tribal creation with moderns coping. This is where the tribal experience of plants and animals looks grand, huge, overwhelming and sometimes sinister, amidst the spitirtuality of drowning water and the sun rays of an abduction. Beatrice's black hair combines with Kerans bleached white hair to form a miracle of a skunk admist giant reptiles--miracles of a creation. I listened to this book with headphones, Mozart and Bach masses also match as does the New World/New Order tunes such as "The Beach." The writing style of The Drowned World is easy going, yet difficult to get into because of the depth, the swamp of it. Ballard writes, "...He longed for this descent through archaeophysic time to reach its conclusion, repressing the knowledge that when it did the external world around him would have become alien and unbearable..." (p. 100). The Madonna-like abuduction experiences are a few mentions, "...But Beatrice stared out over the fires burning in the square, without looking at him and said in a vague voice: 'Listen to the drumming, Robert. How many suns are there, do you think?'" (p.151). I have the 50th Anniversary edition of this book. I started to read it several times before I began to read it with full attention. Then I read it again with headphones from different tunes that reminded me of some of the passages. The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard was written around 1962, before I was born, and I feel that it sometimes captures the miracles of incubation for biodiversity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago